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Red Oak Ii

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December 6, 1992 | JOSH LEMIEUX, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lowell Davis recalls the days when Red Oak was a real town, where scores of men, women and children lived and dreamed. Then the town died, and it seemed destined to be a lonely memory, hidden beyond trees and corn fields as Route 66 drifts west toward the Great Plains. But unlike the quiet deaths of many Midwestern communities, Red Oak survives--if only by force of Davis' imagination.
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NEWS
December 6, 1992 | JOSH LEMIEUX, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lowell Davis recalls the days when Red Oak was a real town, where scores of men, women and children lived and dreamed. Then the town died, and it seemed destined to be a lonely memory, hidden beyond trees and corn fields as Route 66 drifts west toward the Great Plains. But unlike the quiet deaths of many Midwestern communities, Red Oak survives--if only by force of Davis' imagination.
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NEWS
October 9, 1991 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lowell Davis ponders the question: What does he like about modern civilization? He puffs on his corncob pipe for a long moment before deciding, "I can't think of a damned thing." Davis has chosen to live in the past. His past. On a 60-acre plot in southwest Missouri, Davis, an artist-eccentric, has re-created a way of life that he remembers nostalgically from his boyhood on a family farm in Red Oak, now a ghost town 23 miles to the north of what used to be Route 66.
NEWS
October 9, 1991 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lowell Davis ponders the question: What does he like about modern civilization? He puffs on his corncob pipe for a long moment before deciding, "I can't think of a damned thing." Davis has chosen to live in the past. His past. On a 60-acre plot in southwest Missouri, Davis, an artist-eccentric, has re-created a way of life that he remembers nostalgically from his boyhood on a family farm in Red Oak, now a ghost town 23 miles to the north of what used to be Route 66.
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