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Red October

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1990 | PAT H. BROESKE
Despite the presence of the heavily hyped "Blue Steel" and the dueling lambada movies, the weekend box office was again dominated by Paramount's "The Hunt for Red October" and--among limited releases--by a pair of nuns on the run. In the No. 1 spot for the third week, "Red October" torpedoed the box office for another $11 million.
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TRAVEL
February 1, 2014 | By Christopher Reynolds
MOSCOW - Once I came to Moscow to cover an urban ballooning expedition. In winter. But when the balloonists came face to frigid, wind-lashed face with the winter here - well, we never got off the ground. And so, as icy gales scoured the city, I strolled near the Moskva River until I faced a vast, low-hovering cloud, lighted from within, scented with chlorine and cigarettes. Occasionally, a near-naked Muscovite would emerge, dripping, and wander off to look for a towel and his pants.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1990 | PETER COPELAND, SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE
In the final scene of the movie "The Hunt for Red October," CIA Agent Jack Ryan turns to Soviet Capt. Marko Ramius and says, "Welcome to the new world, sir." In that brief moment, the Cold War book by Tom Clancy tries to become a post- glasnost movie, and it sounds just like George Bush welcoming Mikhail S. Gorbachev into the family of nations.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
"Giving your book to Hollywood," Tom Clancy once said, "is like turning your daughter over to a pimp. " The prolific novelist who died Tuesday was not always a fan of the film business, even though his collaborations with the industry all found commercial and critical success. "Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit," which will be released this Christmas by Paramount Pictures, marks only the fifth movie based on the author's characters. Like previous movies based on Clancy's novels, the new film will center on the fast-rising CIA officer fending off global threats - so far, he's tackled nuclear weaponry, drug-smuggling conspiracies and other forms of villainy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1990 | PAT H. BROESKE and SOURCE: Exhibitor Relations Co., Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
It was a hot opening weekend for the Cold War thriller, "The Hunt for Red October." Paramount Pictures' adaptation of Tom Clancy's best-seller had ticket sales of $17.1 million--for one of the biggest openings in a year, and one of the highest per-screen averages ($14,010) for a release of its size (1,225 theaters) in box-office history. The spectacular performance put to rest industry speculation that the $35-million-plus film would be imperiled by its pre- glasnost scenario.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1990 | DENNIS HUNT, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
"Pretty Woman," in its second week atop the Billboard rental chart, is already under attack from an able new challenger, "The Hunt for Red October." One of the year's strongest rental titles, "Red October" could climb to at least No. 2 next week--or maybe even splash "Pretty Woman" out of the top spot. And where did "Q&A" get all this rental appeal? It barreled up to No. 4 in just two weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1990 | ELLEN YAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anthony Estrada, 18, was planning on joining the Air Force until, like many an American male for generations before him, he was swayed to a new military career goal by a movie's glamorous images. But the movie had some help. Estrada, emerging from a showing in Tarzana of "The Hunt for Red October," filled with scenes of high-tech daring in an undersea duel between Soviet and American submarines, ran into a Navy recruiter waiting in the lobby with brochures.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
It was a hot opening weekend for the Cold War thriller, "The Hunt for Red October." Paramount Pictures' adaptation of Tom Clancy's best-seller had ticket sales of an estimated $17 million--the biggest non-summer/non-Christmas opening of the past year, with a startling per-screen average of about $14,000. The spectacular performance put to rest industry speculation that the $35-million film would be imperiled by its pre- glasnost scenario.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1990 | ANTHONY PERRY
The wait is over and now, as the ad says, "The Hunt Is On. 3-2-90." The movie "The Hunt for Red October" is set for national release Friday. You can't tell it, but parts of "Red October" were shot at North Island and at the submarine base at Ballast Point. This is the film the Navy hopes will do for the "silent" service what "Top Gun," filmed at Miramar, did for naval aviation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
For the second weekend in a row, the Cold War proved hot at the box office, as "The Hunt for Red October" racked up another $14 million in ticket sales for the No. 1 spot. In just two weeks, Paramount Pictures' adaptation of Tom Clancy's best-selling thriller has earned nearly $38 million--setting records for the first and second largest winter/spring weekends in box office history.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Tom Clancy, who died Tuesday at age 66, was an author who created imaginary stories from the raw material of a real world in conflict. His audience seemed to grow exponentially as he conquered one media platform after another. In his 1984 debut, "The Hunt for Red October," he proved himself a master of the late Cold War espionage novel, with assorted Russian generals and commissars as his foils. But his fictional creations also took life in movies, television programs and even in a series of video games to which he lent his name.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Tom Clancy died Tuesday in Baltimore at age 66, his publisher, Penguin Group, told the Associated Press. No cause was given. The bestselling author sold 50 million copies of his thrillers, beginning with "The Hunt for Red October" in 1984. Clancy's thrilling pace and high-stakes stories were a perfect fit for the late Cold War era. Many featured wealthy, daring, intelligent CIA agent Jack Ryan, who in later stories became president. A new Jack Ryan book, "Command Authority," is slated to be published Dec. 3. PHOTOS: Tom Clancy: 1947-2013 President Ronald Reagan was said to be a fan. Clancy's bestselling books found a wider audience with the help of Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
Tom Clancy, the military novelist who died Tuesday, was such a prolific author that one would imagine Hollywood was eager to adapt the majority of his many books into films. Particularly because on the few occasions Clancy's novels were turned into movies, both the commercial and critical response was pretty strong. And yet the release of Paramount Pictures' Chris Pine-led "Jack Ryan: Shadow One" this Christmas will mark only the fifth time one of the author's books has gotten the big screen treatment (as well as the fifth time a Ryan movie will come to the screen)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Tom Clancy, the prolific thriller author who died Tuesday at age 66, leaves behind a wide-ranging legacy in entertainment. His wildly successful books -- many of which centered on Jack Ryan, Clancy's fictional CIA agent -- had several spheres of influence in film, television and video games. Here is a round-up of figures that illustrate the breadth of Clancy's clout.    PHOTOS: Tom Clancy: 1947-2013 100 million:  Estimated number of books in print. 17: Total count of No. 1  New York Times bestsellers Four : Theatrical feature films based on Clancy's books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2013 | By Elaine Woo
In 1980, Tom Clancy was making a decent living as an insurance agent. But underwriting fire, casualty and car policies wasn't the stuff of his dreams. In his spare time he began to plot a novel - about an ex-Marine who worked for the CIA and a Soviet submarine commander who wanted to defect. What happened next was the beginning of an American success story that far exceeded his expectations. "I just wanted to be in the Library of Congress catalog," Clancy once said. But his debut novel, "The Hunt for Red October," launched one of the most lucrative publishing franchises in history and turned its author into a household name.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
In a surprising plot twist in Hollywood's largest labor union, Ned Vaughn, a key figure in the campaign to merge Hollywood's actors unions, is resigning as executive vice president of SAG-AFTRA to run as a Republican candidate for the California Assembly. Vaughn said he would seek an Assembly seat in the 66th district, representing L.A. County's South Bay, an unexpected career move for the veteran actor who has been an influential figure in the formation of SAG-AFTRA, which was established a year ago and has about 165,000 members.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1989 | JAY SHARBUTT
Stage 15, Paramount Studios, a typical Hollywood day. Sean Connery of Scotland is being made up to play a Soviet navy officer. Producer Mace Neufeld is praying for bad weather for an important sea shot near San Pedro. Co-star Sam Neill is rehearsing. The set is a 16-ton mock-up of a Soviet sub's control room, mounted on a huge mechanically maneuverable platform 22 feet above Stage 15's concrete floor. "Full left rudder!" Neill barks, and as he does, there is a quake. A real one, 4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1990 | ELLEN YAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anthony Estrada, 18, was planning on joining the Air Force until, like many an American male for generations before him, he was swayed to a new military career goal by a movie's glamorous images. But the movie had some help. Estrada, emerging from a showing in Tarzana of "The Hunt for Red October," filled with scenes of high-tech daring in an undersea duel between Soviet and American submarines, ran into a Navy recruiter waiting in the lobby with brochures.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2010 | By Susan King
Time seems to fly by faster every year. That's why it's so hard to believe that the intense film adaptation of Tom Clancy's Cold War thriller " The Hunt for Red October," starring Sean Connery and Alec Baldwin, is celebrating its 20th anniversary. You can join in the commemoration Thursday as the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Science and Technology Council presents a screening of a new 35-millimeter print at the Linwood Dunn Theater. After the movie, film historian and author Eric Lichtenfeld will talk with crew members.
SPORTS
May 9, 2009
I think it's time Angels fans come to the conclusion (if they haven't already) that management for the team has decided that 2009 is going to be a "learning" season. They will learn if they have any young arms in their system, they will learn if Brian Fuentes was money well spent as a closer, they will learn that a singles-hitting third baseman isn't the answer, they will learn that Maicer Izturis batting third is not the answer and hopefully they will finally learn that little ball doesn't work in the American League.
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