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Red Scare

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1991
Peter Rainer's March 15 review of "Guilty by Suspicion" indicates he made no effort to determine the facts of the period referred to in the movie. That is curious inasmuch as the truth is contained in a series of articles in The Times' morgue. The facts are that there was indeed an organized, funded and executed effort to infiltrate the Screen Actors Guild and the movie industry and to use these for Soviet and communist propaganda. Do you suppose there ever will be a movie detailing what actually happened?
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Writer Budd Schulberg isn't around to see it, but Wednesday, on his 100th birthday, he landed a new Hollywood deal. Schulberg, who died at 95 in 2009, was the son of a Hollywood film producer who first made his mark with the bestselling, iconic Hollywood novel "What Makes Sammy Run?" and went on to win an Oscar for the script of 1954's "On the Waterfront. " Deadline reports that his widow, Betsy Schulberg, has signed with Gersh to represent his estate. According to agency co-head Bob Gersh, “He was an American treasure and a Hollywood legend, and we couldn't be more pleased at Gersh to work with his estate on future projects that will entertain and inform audiences for generations to come.” But Schulberg's legacy isn't quite that simple.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2010 | Dennis McLellan
Charles Muscatine, a world-renowned Chaucer scholar and a longtime advocate for higher education reform who was fired as a young assistant professor of English at UC Berkeley when he refused to sign a loyalty oath during the Red Scare of the 1950s, has died. He was 89. Muscatine died of an infection March 12 at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Oakland, said his daughter, Lissa Muscatine. "Chuck Muscatine was a vital figure in the political leadership of the Berkeley faculty all the way from the loyalty oath controversy through the Free Speech Movement," said David A. Hollinger, a professor of history at UC Berkeley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2011 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Milton Rogovin, a celebrated photographer of the downtrodden who found his calling after he was blacklisted during the Red Scare of the 1950s, died Tuesday at his home in Buffalo, N.Y., his family said. He was 101. "His work is vital and important in the evolution of social documentary photography," Louis Grachos, director of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, told the Buffalo News in 2009. "He's recognized as a national treasure. " His pictures recorded the lives of the poor, the dispossessed, the working class ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2001
Loretta Starvus Stack, 85, one of 15 members of the Communist Party in California arrested during the "Red scare" of the 1950s. Stack's arrest made headlines in 1951 when the political climate was rife with fears of Communist conspiracy. Stack was a party organizational secretary in Northern California who was accused of inciting women to take up arms in support of Socialism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1993 | DAVID H. DORION
They dot Los Angeles like aging sentries, symbols of a threat that no longer exists. One siren is shaped like a rounded birdhouse atop a telephone pole on 3rd Street in Hancock Park, its mustard-yellow paint stained black with soot. Another, near the All-American Burger restaurant on Westwood Boulevard, looks like a wide-brimmed hat as it peeks out from an overgrown tree. "You never hear it, so you forget it's even there," said Brian Ouzounian, 43, whose parents own the burger stand.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1994 | JAN HERMAN
The Commie menace marches on--if not in reality, at least in "Red Scare on Sunset." Kitschmeister Charles Busch spares no effort to parody Hollywood cliches in his 1991 spoof of movieland pinkos during the early '50s. Now on view at the Way Off Broadway Playhouse in Santa Ana, "Red Scare" takes us back before the Reagan revolution to the McCarthy period and shows the Evil Empire spreading its poison propaganda through dread Stanislavski method actors and other nefarious agents.
BOOKS
April 9, 1995 | Samuel G. Freedman, Samuel G. Freedman, the author of "Upon This Rock" and "Small Victories," is writing a book about the transformation of three working-class families from New Deal Democrats to Reagan Republicans.
"You know what blackballing means?" a former security officer for the State Department named Peter Szluk asks the journalist Griffin Fariello during one of the 70 oral histories that make up "Red Scare." "They'd end up on a breadline somewhere, and I didn't give a hoot. Blackballed everywhere--we could do it, yessiree, boy. . . . Get rid of that son of a bitch. Put him on a breadline. And we did."
NEWS
August 2, 1998 | JERRY SCHWARTZ, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Joan, he said, there is something you should know. Their courtship had been swift. They had met in the spring of 1960 at a gathering of the peace group SANE. He told her he was married and his wife was ill. He next called her the day John F. Kennedy was elected president; his wife had died over the summer. Now, three weeks later, Melvin Barnet wanted to ask for her hand. But first, he wanted her to know.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1990
If there is any parallel between the Red Scare and recent events, Burger King might be better compared to those persecuted for taking a stand. Perhaps, while watchdog Rosenberg was looking under the bed, one of the grovelers finally stood up. JASON SKIFSTAD Monrovia
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Jean Benson Wilkinson, who became one of the first Los Angeles public school teachers to be fired for refusing to cooperate with McCarthy-era investigators, died Dec. 28 in Berkeley. She was 96. FOR THE RECORD: Jean Wilkinson: In the Jan. 6 LATExtra section, the obituary of Jean Benson Wilkinson, a Los Angeles teacher who was fired during the Red Scare, cited a 1954 editorial by William Randolph Hearst. The year was correct but not the author; Hearst died in 1951. The editorial was unsigned and ran in the Los Angeles Herald Express, a Hearst newspaper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2010 | Dennis McLellan
Charles Muscatine, a world-renowned Chaucer scholar and a longtime advocate for higher education reform who was fired as a young assistant professor of English at UC Berkeley when he refused to sign a loyalty oath during the Red Scare of the 1950s, has died. He was 89. Muscatine died of an infection March 12 at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Oakland, said his daughter, Lissa Muscatine. "Chuck Muscatine was a vital figure in the political leadership of the Berkeley faculty all the way from the loyalty oath controversy through the Free Speech Movement," said David A. Hollinger, a professor of history at UC Berkeley.
OPINION
June 14, 2007 | Kenneth D. Ackerman, KENNETH D. ACKERMAN is author of "Young J. Edgar: Hoover, the Red Scare, and the Assault on Civil Liberties."
WHAT created J. Edgar Hoover? He reigned with an iron fist as director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation for 48 years, until the day he died in 1972. By then, Hoover had evolved into an untouchable autocrat, a man who kept secret files on millions of Americans over the years and used them to blackmail presidents, senators and movie stars. He ordered burglaries, secret wiretaps or sabotage against anyone he personally considered subversive. His target list included the Rev.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2003 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
In the second year of his confinement, Ignatz Mezei typed a short letter to a federal judge in New York. "Let me go free," he wrote. "I did not kill anybody, I did not steal anybody, I did not make any crime." Indeed, Mezei was not even accused of a crime. It was 1951, and the longtime U.S. resident was being held without charge in an Ellis Island prison because he was suspected of being a communist sympathizer.
NEWS
February 2, 2002 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the faded posters, grainy photographs and yellowed lists of names on display in the gallery of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Beverly Hills is a small booklet affixed with some dirty, 45-year-old laundry. Stapled in 1957 over Article 8, Section 1, Paragraph F of the academy's bylaws, a typewritten revision warns that anyone who admits membership in the Communist Party or who refuses to testify before a "duly constituted Federal legislative committee or body . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Carpenter's Ghosts of Mars" is arguably the horror/sci-fi director's most routine movie. Although Carpenter is sometimes schlocky, sometimes over the top, the maker of "Halloween" and "Escape From New York," among many others, can usually be counted on to generate plenty of thrills and chills in high-energy fashion. But Carpenter's heart doesn't seem to be in this lackluster space adventure set in 2176.
BOOKS
June 12, 1994
In an otherwise informative and commendable review of Murry Kempton's latest book ("Rebellions, Perversities, Main Events," Book Review, April 24), you committed a major error of fact that needs to be corrected. You referred to the accused "atom-spy Alger Hiss." Alger Hiss was never formally accused of atomic espionage or, for that matter, any other kind of espionage. He was charged with and tried for perjury in 1949. The trial ended in a "hung jury" and thus no verdict. Tried a second time in 1950, Hiss was convicted of perjury and sentenced to five years in prison.
OPINION
June 11, 1989
I have just finished reading William Schneider's final lines in your Opinion Section ("Jim Wright's Capitol Punishment," June 4) and that's it! I say let the corrupt politicians all go for each other's throats. Clean out the bunch! Let's get back to our Founding Fathers' idea of public service. I am tired of reading about McCarthyism. It scares me, but not because I believe we are on the eve of another Red Scare. It scares me because cleaning out corruption and greed is being compared to attacking people for their political and philosophical beliefs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2001
Loretta Starvus Stack, 85, one of 15 members of the Communist Party in California arrested during the "Red scare" of the 1950s. Stack's arrest made headlines in 1951 when the political climate was rife with fears of Communist conspiracy. Stack was a party organizational secretary in Northern California who was accused of inciting women to take up arms in support of Socialism.
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | PATT MORRISON
The hits just keep on coming. A scant 8,000 pages released from more than 80 cartons of data and dirt compiled by the state Senate's Un-American Activities Committee over 30 years show a few hits and some big misses: * Witnesses were asked whether they were familiar with "Mankind United," said to be "a race of little men with large metallic heads who dwelled in a subterranean abode somewhere in the interior of the Earth . . . and controlled earthquakes and floods."
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