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Red Schoendienst

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SPORTS
March 1, 1989 | Associated Press
Red Schoendienst, a sure-handed second baseman who led the National League in fielding seven times, and former umpire Al Barlick were elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame Tuesday by the veterans committee, but Phil Rizzuto was snubbed once again. Schoendienst, 66, spent 18 years in the major leagues--14 with the St. Louis Cardinals--and batted over .300 seven times. He also managed the Cardinals from 1965-76, winning pennants in 1967 and '68 and a World Series title in '67.
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SPORTS
July 7, 1990 | CURT HOLBREICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The St. Louis Cardinals welcomed back an old hand as their new manager Friday night and the Padres provided the perfect gift. Playing their first game in nearly 10 years under Red Schoendienst, the Cardinals defeated the Padres, 5-3, in front of 16,992 at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium. The victory allowed Schoendienst to join Connie Mack as the only managers to record victories in four different decades.
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SPORTS
October 25, 1987 | JOHN NELSON, Associated Press
For 11 years, Red Schoendienst roomed with Stan Musial on the road as a member of the St. Louis Cardinals. Now, he walks past a statue of Musial outside Busch Stadium every day on his way to work. "It's the only time I've ever seen a pigeon get him," the red-head said, and laughed. A Cardinal for 14 of his 19 years in the major leagues, then a coach, then a manager and now a coach again, Schoendienst has seen time and many of his former teammates and players pass him by.
SPORTS
July 24, 1989 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Baseball, in its most simple form, is a parent-and-child game. Johnny Bench, Red Schoendienst and Carl Yastrzemski, the newest members of baseball's Hall of Fame, reminded us of that again Sunday as they explained why they were enshrined in this 50-year-old pantheon that's only a fungo shot from the lake that James Fenimore Cooper called Glimmerglass.
SPORTS
July 24, 1989 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Baseball, in its most simple form, is a parent-and-child game. Johnny Bench, Red Schoendienst and Carl Yastrzemski, the newest members of baseball's Hall of Fame, reminded us of that again Sunday as they explained why they were enshrined in this 50-year-old pantheon that's only a fungo shot from the lake that James Fenimore Cooper called Glimmerglass.
SPORTS
July 7, 1990 | CURT HOLBREICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The St. Louis Cardinals welcomed back an old hand as their new manager Friday night and the Padres provided the perfect gift. Playing their first game in nearly 10 years under Red Schoendienst, the Cardinals defeated the Padres, 5-3, in front of 16,992 at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium. The victory allowed Schoendienst to join Connie Mack as the only managers to record victories in four different decades.
SPORTS
June 20, 2000
Only major league players with 200 hits in a season while playing for two teams: Randy Velarde 200 hits for the Angels and Oakland Athletics in 1999 Willie Montanez 206 hits for San Francisco Giants and Atlanta Braves in 1976 Lou Brock 200 hits for the Chicago Cubs and St. Louis Cardinals in 1964 Red Schoendienst 200 hits for New York Giants and Milwaukee Braves in 1957 Emil "Irish" Meusel 201 hits for Philadelphia Phillies and New York Giants in 1921 Source: World Features Syndicate
SPORTS
October 2, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
New Cardinals Manager Joe Torre says that only two of six coaches on the staff he inherited will be back next season. Only Red Schoendienst and bullpen coach Dave Ricketts will return, Torre said. Gone will be hitting coach Steve Braun, first-base coach Jim Riggleman, third-base coach Rich Hacker and pitching coach Mike Roarke. Cardinals pitchers were upset about losing Roarke, who had been with the club seven seasons.
SPORTS
July 19, 1990 | From Times wire services
Add Toronto Blue Jays hitting Coach Gene Tenace to the list of candidates for the St. Louis Cardinals managing job. Tenace told the Hamilton Spectator that he has been given permission by Blue Jays Manager Cito Gaston and Vice President Pat Gillick to talk with Cardinals General Manager Dal Maxvill. "They both told me to go for it," Tenace said.
SPORTS
July 22, 1998 | Associated Press
Seattle Mariner catcher Dan Wilson was placed on the 15-day disabled list Tuesday with torn ligaments in his left ankle. Wilson, who was hitting .254 with eight homers and 40 RBIs, was injured Sunday against Kansas City. It is the first time in his seven-year career that he's gone on the DL. * Detroit Tiger leadoff man Brian Hunter made his mark Monday with the most miserable day for a hitter in major league history. How bad?
SPORTS
March 1, 1989 | Associated Press
Red Schoendienst, a sure-handed second baseman who led the National League in fielding seven times, and former umpire Al Barlick were elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame Tuesday by the veterans committee, but Phil Rizzuto was snubbed once again. Schoendienst, 66, spent 18 years in the major leagues--14 with the St. Louis Cardinals--and batted over .300 seven times. He also managed the Cardinals from 1965-76, winning pennants in 1967 and '68 and a World Series title in '67.
SPORTS
October 25, 1987 | JOHN NELSON, Associated Press
For 11 years, Red Schoendienst roomed with Stan Musial on the road as a member of the St. Louis Cardinals. Now, he walks past a statue of Musial outside Busch Stadium every day on his way to work. "It's the only time I've ever seen a pigeon get him," the red-head said, and laughed. A Cardinal for 14 of his 19 years in the major leagues, then a coach, then a manager and now a coach again, Schoendienst has seen time and many of his former teammates and players pass him by.
SPORTS
October 24, 1995 | From Associated Press
Tony La Russa, who led the Oakland Athletics to a World Series championship and three American League pennants in 10 years, on Monday signed a two-year contract worth an estimated $1.5 million per season to manage the St. Louis Cardinals. The Cardinals finished fourth in the National League Central at 62-81 under Joe Torre and Mike Jorgensen.
SPORTS
July 24, 1989 | RICHARD SANDOMIR
Susan Wagner isn't a baseball fan, but each year she sculpts the memorable visages that represent permanence in baseball history: the Hall of Fame plaques. "Sometimes I get a chill thinking about people coming up to Cooperstown to look at them," says Wagner, who has never seen her work displayed in the Hall. Wagner does her work for Pittsburgh-based Matthews International Corp., maker of the plaques since 1984. Each plaque costs the Hall about $1,100.
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