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WORLD
April 17, 2010 | By Patrick Winn
Thai police bungled the attempted capture Friday of an anti-government "Red Shirt" protest leader who was shown on television escaping from his hotel hide-out using a rope ladder to the cheers of supporters. Authorities had hoped the detention of Arisman Pongruangrong, 46, a pop crooner-turned-political- hard-liner, would blunt the group's momentum. Instead, their failed effort may have further emboldened the Red Shirts, so named for their clothing and paraphernalia. After the botched raid, Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva assigned the chief army commander to take over from a deputy prime minister the job of restoring order as the protesters press to topple the government.
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WORLD
November 28, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI - Thailand's prime minister easily survived a no-confidence vote Thursday, but hundreds of protesters continued to besiege ministries in the capital as her embattled government sought a way out of its political crisis. Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra's ruling Pheu Thai party prevailed in parliament by a vote of 297 to 134. The opposition hoped to unseat the government but members of Yingluck's party held firm in their commanding majority to blunt the challenge. Footage showed her smiling broadly dressed in a dark suit and gold necklace as the vote was announced.
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WORLD
April 15, 2009 | Associated Press
Leaders of demonstrations that plunged the Thai capital into chaos called off their protests Tuesday after rioting that left two dead and more than 120 injured across Bangkok. The swift and unexpected resolution ended with a final crowd of 2,000 die-hard protesters dutifully lining up for waiting government buses to take them home. Thailand Deputy Police Commissioner Watcharapol Prasarnrajkit said four of the protest leaders had surrendered and would be inter- rogated.
NATIONAL
December 19, 2012 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - "Hum!" Jana Ballard bellowed at a group of men old enough to be her father. " HUM!" she said again, a bit more loudly. "Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm," the men replied obediently, their faces flushed from holding the note. It was the fifth time that evening the New York City Labor Chorus had gone through "The Ballad of Joe Hill," a six-verse paean to the ill-fated unionist ("The copper bosses killed you, Joe"), and signs of weariness were showing among the singers. A soprano rolled her eyes.
WORLD
November 28, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI - Thailand's prime minister easily survived a no-confidence vote Thursday, but hundreds of protesters continued to besiege ministries in the capital as her embattled government sought a way out of its political crisis. Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra's ruling Pheu Thai party prevailed in parliament by a vote of 297 to 134. The opposition hoped to unseat the government but members of Yingluck's party held firm in their commanding majority to blunt the challenge. Footage showed her smiling broadly dressed in a dark suit and gold necklace as the vote was announced.
WORLD
October 4, 2012 | By Chris Kraul and Mery Mogollon, Los Angeles Times
CARACAS, Venezuela - In a driving rainstorm before tens of thousands of flag-waving red-shirted supporters gathered in downtown Caracas, a drenched but buoyant President Hugo Chavez insisted that the "life of Venezuela" depended on his victory in Sunday's election. Chavez is seeking a third six-year term, on top of his first two years in office before the constitution was changed to allow longer periods in office. Nearly 19 million Venezuelans are eligible to vote in the election pitting Chavez against Henrique Capriles, the former Miranda state governor.
NATIONAL
December 19, 2012 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - "Hum!" Jana Ballard bellowed at a group of men old enough to be her father. " HUM!" she said again, a bit more loudly. "Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm," the men replied obediently, their faces flushed from holding the note. It was the fifth time that evening the New York City Labor Chorus had gone through "The Ballad of Joe Hill," a six-verse paean to the ill-fated unionist ("The copper bosses killed you, Joe"), and signs of weariness were showing among the singers. A soprano rolled her eyes.
WORLD
May 14, 2010 | By My-Thuan Tran and Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Thai troops on Friday opened fire on anti-government protesters in a bid to clear the streets and end a two-month siege, leaving eight people dead and more than 100 wounded and turning parts of Bangkok's vibrant business district into a virtual war zone. In a country that markets itself to tourists as the "Land of Smiles," the images from the capital were becoming surreal. Thousands of soldiers descended on the city center. Troops in camouflage took cover near five-star hotels in road medians decorated with flowers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1985
A man dressed in a red plaid shirt robbed an Anaheim bank Monday morning, made off with an undetermined amount of money, then robbed a second bank in Garden Grove Monday afternoon without bothering to change his clothes, the FBI reported. FBI spokesman Frank Calley said the man entered the Sumitomo Bank at 2951 W. Ball Road, Anaheim, about 10:20 a.m., handed a note to a teller and indicated that he had a gun, although none was seen.
WORLD
May 14, 2010 | By Mark Magnier and Patrick Winn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A Thai general who broke ranks to lead anti-government protests was shot in the head Thursday, an assault likely to inflame passions and undermine tenuous talks to end the demonstrators' two-month occupation of a prime Bangkok shopping area. No one took immediate responsibility for the apparent sniper attack on Maj. Gen. Khattiya Sawasdipol, who was injured and hospitalized. The government's emergency medical center said one protester was killed in subsequent clashes between demonstrators and security forces.
WORLD
October 4, 2012 | By Chris Kraul and Mery Mogollon, Los Angeles Times
CARACAS, Venezuela - In a driving rainstorm before tens of thousands of flag-waving red-shirted supporters gathered in downtown Caracas, a drenched but buoyant President Hugo Chavez insisted that the "life of Venezuela" depended on his victory in Sunday's election. Chavez is seeking a third six-year term, on top of his first two years in office before the constitution was changed to allow longer periods in office. Nearly 19 million Venezuelans are eligible to vote in the election pitting Chavez against Henrique Capriles, the former Miranda state governor.
WORLD
May 20, 2010 | My-Thuan Tran and Mark Magnier
As Thailand's army retook Bangkok's premier shopping district Wednesday from thousands of anti-government protesters in a bloody offensive, many Thais looked for the government to address the corruption, poverty and social inequities that sparked the unrest. The government of Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva should call for national elections, create policies that directly benefit the underprivileged and avoid overly harsh punishment for the leaders of the so-called Red Shirt movement, they said.
WORLD
May 18, 2010 | By My-Thuan Tran and Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Bangkok awoke to an uneasy calm Tuesday as political moderates scrambled to find a way to avert the bloodshed many believe is likely if Thailand's army moves to disperse thousands of people from an anti-government protest camp. A deadline passed Monday for anti-government protesters to leave their encampment in a posh Bangkok shopping district. Pitched street battles have claimed at least 37 lives, and many schools and businesses remained shuttered. The United Nations urged a negotiated solution, while the government said late Monday that it would accept a cease-fire offer from one protest leader if demonstrators who spilled into the streets halted their fighting and returned to their base.
WORLD
May 14, 2010 | By My-Thuan Tran and Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Thai troops on Friday opened fire on anti-government protesters in a bid to clear the streets and end a two-month siege, leaving eight people dead and more than 100 wounded and turning parts of Bangkok's vibrant business district into a virtual war zone. In a country that markets itself to tourists as the "Land of Smiles," the images from the capital were becoming surreal. Thousands of soldiers descended on the city center. Troops in camouflage took cover near five-star hotels in road medians decorated with flowers.
WORLD
May 14, 2010 | By Mark Magnier and Patrick Winn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A Thai general who broke ranks to lead anti-government protests was shot in the head Thursday, an assault likely to inflame passions and undermine tenuous talks to end the demonstrators' two-month occupation of a prime Bangkok shopping area. No one took immediate responsibility for the apparent sniper attack on Maj. Gen. Khattiya Sawasdipol, who was injured and hospitalized. The government's emergency medical center said one protester was killed in subsequent clashes between demonstrators and security forces.
WORLD
April 29, 2010 | Mark Magnier and Patrick Winn
Thai security forces fired into a crowd of anti-government protesters on the outskirts of Bangkok on Wednesday in a bid to keep demonstrators contained in the capital. A soldier was killed and at least 18 protesters injured in the melee, the government's Erawan emergency center reported. It was not immediately clear whether the troops were using live ammunition, rubber bullets or both, and there was some speculation that the soldier was accidentally shot by security forces. The showdown, the third time protests have turned deadly in the last three weeks, occurred along a major street connecting the capital with its northern suburbs as the Bangkok demonstrators, known as "Red Shirts," tried to take their protest on the road in a convoy of vehicles.
WORLD
May 20, 2010 | My-Thuan Tran and Mark Magnier
As Thailand's army retook Bangkok's premier shopping district Wednesday from thousands of anti-government protesters in a bloody offensive, many Thais looked for the government to address the corruption, poverty and social inequities that sparked the unrest. The government of Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva should call for national elections, create policies that directly benefit the underprivileged and avoid overly harsh punishment for the leaders of the so-called Red Shirt movement, they said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1998 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking a cue from rabid fans elsewhere around the world, members of Sam's Army will do just about anything to call attention to the exploits of the U.S. soccer team. The CONCACAF Gold Cup final between Mexico and the United States hadn't even started Sunday at the Coliseum when the Sammers--as they call themselves--first raised Old Glory. Dressed in their signature red shirts, they rang cowbells. They banged drums. They wore blue wigs.
WORLD
April 22, 2010 | By Mark Magnier
The political standoff in Thailand's capital turned deadly for the second time in two weeks Thursday when five grenade blasts in the business district killed at least one person and wounded 75. Deputy Prime Minister Suthep Thaugsuban told a nationwide television audience that the M-79 grenades, one of which was detonated near a hotel, another near a bank on Silom Road, originated in a Bangkok park occupied by protesters. But in the confusion it was not immediately clear who was responsible.
WORLD
April 17, 2010 | By Patrick Winn
Thai police bungled the attempted capture Friday of an anti-government "Red Shirt" protest leader who was shown on television escaping from his hotel hide-out using a rope ladder to the cheers of supporters. Authorities had hoped the detention of Arisman Pongruangrong, 46, a pop crooner-turned-political- hard-liner, would blunt the group's momentum. Instead, their failed effort may have further emboldened the Red Shirts, so named for their clothing and paraphernalia. After the botched raid, Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva assigned the chief army commander to take over from a deputy prime minister the job of restoring order as the protesters press to topple the government.
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