Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRed Snapper
IN THE NEWS

Red Snapper

FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
May 9, 1985 | ISAAC CRONIN and PAUL JOHNSON, Cronin and Johnson are co-authors of "The California Seafood Cookbook."
In 1972, the California Legislature passed a law prohibiting the use of the designation "red snapper" as a name for local rockfish, but the name of this unrelated Gulf Coast member of the drum family is still applied to California fish. (The red snapper's taste and texture are different from our local rockfish's.) West Coast fish dealers have long sought to stimulate sales by using other inappropriate names as well.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Tests on seafood sold at Los Angeles sushi bars, other restaurants, and grocery stores have revealed that more than half is not labeled correctly, a nonprofit organization is reporting. Red snapper, Dover sole, white tuna and other fish were often different species, the group Oceana found in DNA tests of seafood from 74 retail outlets in Los Angeles. In all, 55% of 119 fish samples from across L.A. were misidentified, Oceana said. Oceana focused on the frequency of mislabeling rather than its origins.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Red snapper is one fish that Southern Californians seem to like. It is plentiful year-round, relatively inexpensive and versatile enough to prepare in any number of dishes. And with the Pacific Ocean lapping at the county's shore, local consumers are only a seafood outlet away from same-day locally caught fish. The only problem is--they aren't eating "Red Snapper." The only true red snapper caught in U.S.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Does your seafood look more succulent than it is? “Overglazing” fish by adding layers of ice and “soaking” scallops to boost bloat are common -- and fraudulent -- tactics that federal seafood officials say they're trying to curb. Economic fraud is endemic is at least 40% of products submitted to the seafood inspection program at the National Marine Fisheries Service, chief quality officer Steven Wilson said at the International Boston Seafood Show this week. In at least 80% of those cases, added weighting that raises seafood prices is at fault, according to the Associated Press . "We've decided we're going to take on the economic fraud concern," Wilson said at the confab.
NEWS
January 25, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three national environmental groups will petition federal officials today to list a type of Pacific red snapper as "threatened" under the Endangered Species Act. Bocaccio, one of several species sold in the grocery store as Pacific red snapper, was formerly the most abundant rockfish off Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three national environmental groups will petition federal officials today to list a type of Pacific red snapper as "threatened" under the Endangered Species Act. Bocaccio, one of several species sold in the grocery store as Pacific red snapper, was formerly the most abundant ground fish off Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Tests on seafood sold at Los Angeles sushi bars, other restaurants, and grocery stores have revealed that more than half is not labeled correctly, a nonprofit organization is reporting. Red snapper, Dover sole, white tuna and other fish were often different species, the group Oceana found in DNA tests of seafood from 74 retail outlets in Los Angeles. In all, 55% of 119 fish samples from across L.A. were misidentified, Oceana said. Oceana focused on the frequency of mislabeling rather than its origins.
FOOD
August 12, 2010 | By C. Thi Nguyen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Front Page Jamaican Grille is one of those places where the guy working behind the counter will tell you, in no uncertain terms, what his favorite dish is. Where the owner will come out and shower love on your dog and then show you pictures of her own sweet pup. Where regulars in hot pink dresses breezing by to pick up their dinners will lean over your table, eye your oxtails and tell you: "Ooh, you got the good stuff!" People having their first bite of Front Page's jerk chicken typically fall silent, in a sort of reverent awe at the char and spice.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
Shrimpers, already outraged by regulations intended to protect endangered sea turtles, got a two-year reprieve from a federal panel charged with preventing overfishing in the Gulf of Mexico. By a 10-7 vote Thursday, the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Management Council lowered the number of red snapper that both commercial and sport fishermen may catch in 1991 but took no immediate steps to regulate shrimpers.
NEWS
January 10, 1991 | JOHN PENNER
Lyndy's Restaurant, 924 S. Beach Blvd. (at Ball Road), Anaheim. Open daily from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. (714) 761-0234. Unlike most other culinary shrines to Marilyn, Elvis and James Dean, Lyndy's offers a menu replete with alternatives to the usual diner fare. Turkey is a specialty, and daily specials might include red snapper, enchiladas or potato pancakes.
FOOD
August 12, 2010 | By C. Thi Nguyen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Front Page Jamaican Grille is one of those places where the guy working behind the counter will tell you, in no uncertain terms, what his favorite dish is. Where the owner will come out and shower love on your dog and then show you pictures of her own sweet pup. Where regulars in hot pink dresses breezing by to pick up their dinners will lean over your table, eye your oxtails and tell you: "Ooh, you got the good stuff!" People having their first bite of Front Page's jerk chicken typically fall silent, in a sort of reverent awe at the char and spice.
NATIONAL
June 9, 2010 | By Jim Tankersley
Early on the morning of June 5, the scientists on this federal research ship saw a ghost. Its faint white silhouette appeared on their computer screens, glimpsed at a depth of 1,100 meters by a sophisticated sonar device. The Thomas Jefferson motored on. Thirty hours later, the ship returned to that spot in the Gulf of Mexico, seven and a half miles west-southwest of the runaway deepwater oil leak. This time, the ghost was gone. It was the most instructive encounter yet between researchers and what some federal officials have dubbed "the Loch Ness Plume" — an apparently large and elusive mass of hydrocarbons roaming the deep sea, with potentially devastating consequences for marine life for months, even years, to come.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2002 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration rejected a petition Thursday to place a severely depleted rockfish on the list of endangered species, saying that new fishing restrictions should protect the fish from extinction "within the foreseeable future." In its 23-page decision, the National Marine Fisheries Service blamed itself and the Pacific Fishery Management Council, which it oversees, for failing to prevent the collapse of the bocaccio rockfish, whose numbers have plunged by 96.
NEWS
January 25, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three national environmental groups will petition federal officials today to list a type of Pacific red snapper as "threatened" under the Endangered Species Act. Bocaccio, one of several species sold in the grocery store as Pacific red snapper, was formerly the most abundant rockfish off Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three national environmental groups will petition federal officials today to list a type of Pacific red snapper as "threatened" under the Endangered Species Act. Bocaccio, one of several species sold in the grocery store as Pacific red snapper, was formerly the most abundant ground fish off Southern California.
FOOD
June 10, 1998 | MAYI BRADY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Chinese-style steamed catfish is moist and perfumed with ginger, cilantro and soy sauce. At the market recently, I saw some great-looking snapper and decided to give it the catfish treatment. I liked what I got. The snapper, mild in flavor, picked up the taste of the ginger, garlic and cilantro aromatics. As with so much Asian cooking, the real work is in the chopping, and with this recipe, it isn't even much work.
NEWS
February 18, 1988 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott is a regular contributor to Orange County Life
Want to know if Nick D'Amato's fish are fresh? Shake hands with him. One solid grip will tell you that he pulled his catch of red snapper and sea trout out of the Catalina Channel maybe three hours before. They are the hands of a fisherman, a man who brought his trade from his native Italy to Newport Beach, who sails on the sea each day in his tiny dory as other Southern Californians negotiate the freeways. Every morning, nearly every day of the year, around 4 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1995 | MAX JACOBSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You might not expect homey Peruvian cooking in a Brand Boulevard roadhouse right near several new- and used-car dealerships. But that's Mamita, a friendly, casual stop where most of the clientele seems to be on a first-name basis with the entire staff. Its name is Spanish for "little mother"; ironically, owner Nena Chinen's first name means "little doll." And in case you're wondering about that last name, Chinen's father is Peruvian of Okinawan extraction.
FOOD
November 5, 1992
Make sure your free-range chickens don't free-range where they might eat velvet weed (it's common in cornfields). Velvet-weed seeds deactivate the enzyme that converts the saturated fats in a hen's eggs to unsaturated fats. As a result, the yolks turn as tough as rubber when they're refrigerated. No kidding--they bounce. Don't Thank Bossie Almond Cheeze, made from almonds and other ingredients such as casein and carrageen, is a boon for dieters and people who can't eat dairy products.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|