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March 4, 2008 | Peter Yoon, Times Staff Writer
With the retirement of Cuban leader Fidel Castro comes new hope for the golf industry in Cuba, according to the Wall Street Journal. Cuba was once home to several world-class courses, but the sport went into a steep decline in 1962, after Castro lost a golf match against guerrilla icon Ernesto "Che" Guevara. Almost immediately Castro "had one Havana golf course turned into a military school, another into an art school," the Journal reported. "A journalist who wrote about the defeat of Cuba's Maximum Leader, who was a notoriously bad loser, was fired the next day."
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NATIONAL
October 31, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Boston loves its Red Sox, but after the team's World Series championship win Wednesday night at Fenway Park, many of the Boston faithful paid tribute to an entirely different sporting event, the Boston Marathon. Amid the jubilation outside Fenway, which saw fans running through the streets, jumping on top of cabs -- and in some cases smashing car windows -- others headed to the Boston Marathon finish line on Boylston Street, where a terrorist attack sent the city into shock on April 15. Video from Boylston Street showed fans kneeling and posing for photos at the finish line laid over the street.
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SPORTS
June 15, 1995 | STEVE MARANTZ, THE SPORTING NEWS
It is fashionable to pronounce baseball dead. Pollsters and pundits insist baseball is less popular than basketball, football and Vietnamese noodle soup. Allegedly it is too long for the attention-challenged MTV generation and too conflicted for feel-good Baby Boomers. Senior citizens are too busy cashing Social Security checks to care. Excuse me while I chuckle. Baseball can't die. It's got too many boobs and fools destined for immortality. You can't kill it.
SPORTS
May 10, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Boston Red Sox public address announcer Carl Beane died on Wednesday after suffering a heart attack while driving in Sturbridge, Mass. He was 59. "We are filled with sadness at this tragic news," Red Sox president Larry Lucchino said. "His legion of friends with the Red Sox and the media will miss him enormously, and all of Red Sox Nation will remember his presence, his warmth, and his voice. " Beane died after his car hit a tree and a wall. “No one loved his role with the Red Sox more than Carl did his,” Lucchino said.
SPORTS
May 10, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Boston Red Sox public address announcer Carl Beane died on Wednesday after suffering a heart attack while driving in Sturbridge, Mass. He was 59. "We are filled with sadness at this tragic news," Red Sox president Larry Lucchino said. "His legion of friends with the Red Sox and the media will miss him enormously, and all of Red Sox Nation will remember his presence, his warmth, and his voice. " Beane died after his car hit a tree and a wall. “No one loved his role with the Red Sox more than Carl did his,” Lucchino said.
SPORTS
April 8, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A doughnut shop advertisement behind the outfield bleachers proclaims "Welcome to Fenway" in Japanese, anticipating new Red Sox pitcher Daisuke Matsuzaka and the fans and media expected to arrive with him. But they won't be the only newcomers in the Boston ballpark this season. The Red Sox have added a bleacher section on the roof deck in right field with 200 seats that will be sold for $25 apiece.
SPORTS
March 24, 2008 | Kevin Baxter, Times Staff Writer
FORT MYERS, Fla. -- Mark Prather remembers when Red Sox Nation was a small country, like Luxembourg or Orange County. "Old-school people like me have been loving them forever," said Prather, decked out in an old-school Carl Yastrzemski jersey as he took in an early spring exhibition game here. "Now you have a second group that are like, 'Let's jump on the bandwagon.' There's a transition." "Yeah," added fellow fan Dan Gosslin from inside his Carlton Fisk T-shirt.
SPORTS
October 7, 2005 | Tim Brown, Times Staff Writer
Back to Fenway Park, where, if the local guys are going to go on about their backs being against the wall, at least it's big and green and friendly. The widely held view here is the Boston Red Sox have played themselves into a familiar place; they have lost the first two games of a best-of-five American League division series to the Chicago White Sox, and in their best scenario have a weekend of elimination games ahead. In their worst, they have only one, tonight's.
SPORTS
August 25, 2007 | Peter Yoon, Times Staff Writer
Wheel of Fortune host Pat Sajak and his 16-year-old son had a "Field of Dreams"-type week -- one that demonstrated how baseball brings fathers and sons together. Last Saturday at Dodger Stadium, they watched the Dodgers lose, 7-4, to the Colorado Rockies in a 14-inning game that lasted more than five hours. A cross-country flight later, the father-son tandem arrived in Baltimore in time to witness the 30-run outburst by the Texas Rangers on Wednesday night at Camden Yards.
SPORTS
June 19, 2010 | Dylan Hernandez
In the city where he once effortlessly swayed the fan base from one end of the emotional spectrum to the other, Manny Ramirez discovered Friday night that he had lost the capacity to inspire. Some cheered when Ramirez's name blared over the public-address system at Fenway Park and others booed, but they did so without conviction, the voices of gratitude and disapproval quickly blending with the murmurs of the indifferent. Red Sox Nation had withstood Ramirez's departure. He was now 38 years old and no longer a feared hitter worthy of praise or disdain.
SPORTS
June 19, 2010 | Dylan Hernandez
In the city where he once effortlessly swayed the fan base from one end of the emotional spectrum to the other, Manny Ramirez discovered Friday night that he had lost the capacity to inspire. Some cheered when Ramirez's name blared over the public-address system at Fenway Park and others booed, but they did so without conviction, the voices of gratitude and disapproval quickly blending with the murmurs of the indifferent. Red Sox Nation had withstood Ramirez's departure. He was now 38 years old and no longer a feared hitter worthy of praise or disdain.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2009 | Geraldine Baum
If any other city had a team as talented as this year's Yankees, it would consider them a blessing. In New York, it's just a comeback. Or as one local headline put it Monday morning after the team advanced to the World Series: "Yankees BACK where they belong" Tonight, as pinstriped players walk for the 40th time in almost a century onto a field in the Bronx for the ultimate baseball competition, New York will be bathed in...
SPORTS
October 13, 2008 | Mike DiGiovanna, Times Staff Writer
BOSTON -- Bleary-eyed and beaten after an emotionally and physically draining 9-8 late-night loss to Tampa Bay, the Boston Red Sox returned home to a brilliant autumn Sunday, the weather clear and crisp, the leaves all over New England bursting with color. Inside Fenway Park, the scene was not as soothing, the Red Sox coming out of an 11-inning, 5-hour 27-minute marathon looking far worse for wear, whether they would admit it or not.
SPORTS
March 24, 2008 | Kevin Baxter, Times Staff Writer
FORT MYERS, Fla. -- Mark Prather remembers when Red Sox Nation was a small country, like Luxembourg or Orange County. "Old-school people like me have been loving them forever," said Prather, decked out in an old-school Carl Yastrzemski jersey as he took in an early spring exhibition game here. "Now you have a second group that are like, 'Let's jump on the bandwagon.' There's a transition." "Yeah," added fellow fan Dan Gosslin from inside his Carlton Fisk T-shirt.
SPORTS
March 4, 2008 | Peter Yoon, Times Staff Writer
With the retirement of Cuban leader Fidel Castro comes new hope for the golf industry in Cuba, according to the Wall Street Journal. Cuba was once home to several world-class courses, but the sport went into a steep decline in 1962, after Castro lost a golf match against guerrilla icon Ernesto "Che" Guevara. Almost immediately Castro "had one Havana golf course turned into a military school, another into an art school," the Journal reported. "A journalist who wrote about the defeat of Cuba's Maximum Leader, who was a notoriously bad loser, was fired the next day."
SPORTS
January 29, 2008 | Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writer
Dan Duquette's decision to let Roger Clemens leave the Boston Red Sox after the 1996 season still generates ridicule. The studious general manager inspected Clemens' 40-39 record over four seasons, and concluded the then-34-year-old "Rocket" had only so much life left. Duquette watched Clemens sign with the Toronto Blue Jays, wishing him well in the "twilight of his career." Some twilight.
SPORTS
October 18, 2003
This year's league championship series presented fans with two possible outcomes: 1) The end of the world. 2) The Yankees in another World Series. Dang! I was so rooting for the end of the world. John Thompson Chino Are the Chicago Cubs cursed? No doubt about it. But it's not the curse of the billy goat, it's the curse of the ex-Dodger first basemen -- from Steve Garvey's MVP performance for San Diego against them in 1984 to Eric Karros' LVP (least valuable player)
SPORTS
March 26, 2000 | MAL FLORENCE
Dan Shaughnessy in the Boston Globe: "This week's issue of Sports Illustrated features a nifty cover shot of Pedro Martinez and a headline you thought you'd never see: 'Why the Red Sox will win the World Series.' ". . . It's nice to see the Sox finally getting some respect, but the cover prediction undoubtedly will contribute to the paranoia and collective angst that pains the soul of the Red Sox nation. " 'We got the SI Jinx, we got the Bambino, . . .' said Boston first baseman Mike Stanley."
SPORTS
October 24, 2007 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
BOSTON -- John Henry stood next to the batting cage Tuesday at Fenway Park, telling the story with a smile. He could afford to smile. He owns the Boston Red Sox, the most popular team in the land. But not everywhere in the land. Tom Werner, the Red Sox chairman, ran into the owner of another team not long ago. That owner -- Henry wouldn't identify him -- told Werner the Red Sox had become "the most disliked team in baseball."
SPORTS
October 19, 2007 | Mike DiGiovanna, Times Staff Writer
CLEVELAND -- Josh Beckett's back couldn't have been too sore. If it was, how could the Boston ace have hoisted 24 teammates, a manager, six coaches and the hopes of an entire Red Sox Nation on his shoulders and all but carried them from the shores of Lake Erie to the banks of the Charles River, like he did Thursday night?
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