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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Jupiter's Great Red Spot is getting redder, following a color change by a 6,200-mile-wide belt of clouds, scientists said as NASA prepares for the Galileo's six-year mission to the planet. "This is a dynamical, neat place to look at. It's changing and doing wild things on a huge scale," said Rita Beebe, an astronomer at New Mexico State University. British astronomer G. M. Hurst on July 16 first noticed that Jupiter's 6,200-mile-wide Southern Equatorial Belt was changing from brown to white.
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NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Laura E. Davis
Scientists may have figured out why Jupiter's Great Red Spot -- the massive storm that's two to three times the size of Earth -- has stuck around for so long, and the finding may give us more insight into similar vortices on Earth and the formation of stars and planets. The Red Spot has been around for centuries, and scientists didn't know why. Their theories led them to believe the vortex should have disappeared after decades, not stuck around for hundreds of years. So Pedram Hassanzadeh, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard, and Philip Marcus, a professor of fluid dynamics at UC Berkeley, decided to try to figure out why the Red Spot had endured.
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NEWS
December 18, 1994 | DONALD J. FREDERICK, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
If any strange weather occurs in the next few months, some people probably will blame Jupiter and the chunks of comet that slammed into it. Wrong, but not as far-fetched as it sounds. By studying the effects of the comet's impacts, scientists may learn more about Earth's atmosphere and weather. Like Earth, Jupiter and some other planets in the solar system come equipped with an atmosphere, clouds, jet streams and storms.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2011 | By Diane K. Fisher
The ancient Romans made up stories about gods and goddesses. These stories are called myths. According to one ancient Roman myth, Jupiter was the top god. He had two brothers and three sisters. The three boys got to divide up the world, with Jupiter getting the sky, Neptune getting the ocean and Pluto getting the underworld. Jupiter was powerful, and he really liked to throw his weight around. He hurled lightning bolts, created booming thunder and cloudbursts of rain, and generally made the other gods nervous.
SCIENCE
May 5, 2006 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
Jupiter's Great Red Spot suddenly has a sibling -- an enormous new spot that some planetary scientists think could be evidence of global climate change sweeping the gaseous planet. The new spot -- dubbed Red Spot Junior -- is roughly half the size of the Great Red Spot. Both are caused by violent storms churning the upper atmosphere of the solar system's largest planet. Amateur and professional astronomers have been observing the new spot for the last few weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1989
One of the city's 12 most-wanted bank robbers was arrested Thursday, one day after the Los Angeles Police Department released a list of the suspected felons. Archie Michael Wolf, 35, also known as "Red Eye" because of a red spot between his left eye and nose, was arrested at 12:15 p.m. at his Sylmar apartment at 14040 Foothill Road, detective Joe Chandler said. Wolf is believed to be responsible for 17 bank robberies in Los Angeles and 10 others in the county, Chandler said.
SPORTS
October 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
University of Michigan officials cannot be accused of being soft on rule enforcement, but rule violations are going soft on them. The school announced plans to add marshmallows to the list of objects banned from Michigan Stadium during Wolverine football games. Already banned are umbrellas, coolers, chair backs, backpacks and alcoholic beverages. "This sounds funny, but it's a real problem," Bruce Madej, Michigan director of sports information, said Tuesday.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
So that mean-looking AK-47 you had your eye on is suddenly hard to get. Try another kind of self-defense weapon, advises the South Pasadena Police Department. It works fast, it disables an assailant without killing or maiming, and it fits neatly into purse or pocket. It's tear gas, the bodyguard in an aerosol can. About 30 people went to the South Pasadena City Council chambers on Wednesday night to learn about the user-friendly crystalline substance, which achieved fame (and some notoriety)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2011 | By Diane K. Fisher
The ancient Romans made up stories about gods and goddesses. These stories are called myths. According to one ancient Roman myth, Jupiter was the top god. He had two brothers and three sisters. The three boys got to divide up the world, with Jupiter getting the sky, Neptune getting the ocean and Pluto getting the underworld. Jupiter was powerful, and he really liked to throw his weight around. He hurled lightning bolts, created booming thunder and cloudbursts of rain, and generally made the other gods nervous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1989 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
So that mean-looking AK-47 you had your eye on is suddenly hard to get. Try another kind of self-defense weapon, advises the South Pasadena Police Department. It works fast, it disables an assailant without killing or maiming and it fits neatly into purse or pocket. What is it? It's tear gas, the bodyguard in an aerosol can. About 30 people went to the South Pasadena City Council chambers one recent night to learn about the user-friendly, crystalline substance, which achieved fame (and some notoriety)
SCIENCE
August 5, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jupiter's Great Red Spot -- a high-pressure storm on the big planet's surface -- has been around for centuries, but on Monday, astronomers released images of a young, smaller Jovian storm they call Red Spot Jr. Using the Keck II telescope on Hawaii's Mauna Kea, scientists from UC Berkeley and the W.M. Keck Observatory captured a high-resolution picture of both spots on July 20. Red Spot Jr. is about as wide as Earth and formed between 1998 and 2000. It turned red in December 2005.
SCIENCE
May 5, 2006 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
Jupiter's Great Red Spot suddenly has a sibling -- an enormous new spot that some planetary scientists think could be evidence of global climate change sweeping the gaseous planet. The new spot -- dubbed Red Spot Junior -- is roughly half the size of the Great Red Spot. Both are caused by violent storms churning the upper atmosphere of the solar system's largest planet. Amateur and professional astronomers have been observing the new spot for the last few weeks.
NEWS
May 11, 2004 | David Lukas
[BUFO PUNCTATUS] After hibernating for seven to 10 months and living off water stored in an overly large bladder, red-spotted toads must feel indescribably good when at last drinking through a delicate patch of skin on their belly. Otherwise protected from the arid desert environment by thick, dry skin, the 2-inch-long inhabitants of southeastern California sit on damp soil to rehydrate.
NEWS
November 26, 1995 | LAURA GALLOWAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Since opening in February, the Red restaurant has made its niche on Beverly Boulevard as yet another hangout for trendy Angelenos of all ages. Nearly every day a mishmash of patrons gather to nosh at the restaurant's outdoor tables. Drive by and you can't miss the spot where MAC lipstick and those shag haircuts--popularized by the television show "Friends"--reign supreme.
NEWS
December 18, 1994 | DONALD J. FREDERICK, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
If any strange weather occurs in the next few months, some people probably will blame Jupiter and the chunks of comet that slammed into it. Wrong, but not as far-fetched as it sounds. By studying the effects of the comet's impacts, scientists may learn more about Earth's atmosphere and weather. Like Earth, Jupiter and some other planets in the solar system come equipped with an atmosphere, clouds, jet streams and storms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
Jupiter's Great Red Spot may soon lose some of its red coloring because of a weather change on the largest planet in the solar system, NASA astronomers said last week. A 6,200-mile-wide belt of clouds on the planet is starting to change to its typical dark brown smoggy color, 13 1/2 months after it turned white, astronomers said. When this happens, eddies in its winds start feeding ammonia ice crystals into the spot, washing out some of the red color.
NEWS
May 11, 2004 | David Lukas
[BUFO PUNCTATUS] After hibernating for seven to 10 months and living off water stored in an overly large bladder, red-spotted toads must feel indescribably good when at last drinking through a delicate patch of skin on their belly. Otherwise protected from the arid desert environment by thick, dry skin, the 2-inch-long inhabitants of southeastern California sit on damp soil to rehydrate.
SCIENCE
August 5, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jupiter's Great Red Spot -- a high-pressure storm on the big planet's surface -- has been around for centuries, but on Monday, astronomers released images of a young, smaller Jovian storm they call Red Spot Jr. Using the Keck II telescope on Hawaii's Mauna Kea, scientists from UC Berkeley and the W.M. Keck Observatory captured a high-resolution picture of both spots on July 20. Red Spot Jr. is about as wide as Earth and formed between 1998 and 2000. It turned red in December 2005.
SPORTS
May 12, 1990 | DAN HAFNER
Apparently nothing can stop the Cincinnati Reds. They've built the best record in the National League even though Eric Davis has been able to play only 11 games. Friday night at Cincinnati, they had to play without Mariano Duncon, the leading hitter in the majors. Duncan, batting .400, was suspended for one game for putting his hand on umpire Mark Hirschbeck during an arguement Wednesday night in a game at Pittsburgh.
SPORTS
October 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
University of Michigan officials cannot be accused of being soft on rule enforcement, but rule violations are going soft on them. The school announced plans to add marshmallows to the list of objects banned from Michigan Stadium during Wolverine football games. Already banned are umbrellas, coolers, chair backs, backpacks and alcoholic beverages. "This sounds funny, but it's a real problem," Bruce Madej, Michigan director of sports information, said Tuesday.
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