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Red States And Blue States

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2004 | Dana Parsons
As the Frontier Airlines jet taxied toward the terminal at John Wayne Airport last week, I could finally breathe easily. After two weeks in a Red State, I was back home in a Blue State. America is engaged in a pitched battle, a divisive culture war that's increasingly hostile and unforgiving -- and where the battleground is defined by Red States and Blue States. Or so we're told. I'd been warned about venturing into a Red State alone, but took my chances.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2004 | Dana Parsons
As the Frontier Airlines jet taxied toward the terminal at John Wayne Airport last week, I could finally breathe easily. After two weeks in a Red State, I was back home in a Blue State. America is engaged in a pitched battle, a divisive culture war that's increasingly hostile and unforgiving -- and where the battleground is defined by Red States and Blue States. Or so we're told. I'd been warned about venturing into a Red State alone, but took my chances.
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NEWS
October 28, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Now Fox political pundit Bill O’Reilly will have a new factor to consider in vetting his guests. Researchers say they have found a "liberal gene" that ties political ideology to something other than social factors. The study published Thursday in the Journal of Politics comes from UC San Diego and Harvard University researchers who overlaid the presence of a dopamine receptor gene called DRD4 with the social networks of 2,000 people to examine the potential link. Here's how a UC San Diego statement explains the study: "[Researchers]
NATIONAL
January 6, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Excerpts from Sen. Barack Obama's victory speech to his supporters in Des Moines after the Iowa caucuses: You know, they said this day would never come. They said our sights were set too high. They said this country was too divided, too disillusioned to ever come together around a common purpose. But on this January night, at this defining moment in history, you have done what the cynics said we couldn't do. . . .
NATIONAL
July 28, 2004 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
The networks that give us "Fear Factor," "Big Brother" and "The Bachelor" didn't see good business in showing us the Democratic National Convention on Tuesday night. It's true enough that, as a reality show, the convention doesn't offer people eating worms or pledging their undying love to a hard body they met a few hours ago. Is this a violation of public trust or a strategic, if jaded, view of the lack of drama at today's political conventions?
OPINION
November 1, 2008
Re "An American president," editorial, Oct. 26 In recalling times when America was divided into the "patriotic" and the "un-American," you neglected to include the one that started with the invasion of Iraq and has not ended yet. Those who were against the war were accused of being unpatriotic and of not supporting the troops. Flag symbols on autos and lapels no longer represented pure patriotism but signaled support for the war. That is when I removed my lapel pin and the small flag emblem from my car. Those today who assign the "unpatriotic" label or divide us into pro-American and anti-American -- "with us or against us"-- are finding fertile ground first tilled at the start of the Iraq war. Bette Balliet Mission Viejo -- I hope the message of your editorial reaches beyond Southern California and is emulated in the editorial pages of newspapers throughout the country.
OPINION
February 1, 2005 | Mike Berland and Doug Schoen, Mike Berland and Doug Schoen are partners at the research firm Penn, Schoen & Berland in New York.
This week, Americans will celebrate this country's 11th national holiday -- Super Bowl Sunday. In a nation of highly polarized red states and blue states, what else do we all join together to celebrate? Only the Super Bowl can truly claim to be a uniter, not a divider.
OPINION
October 21, 2011 | By Lisa P. Jackson
Americans must once again stand up for their right to clean air and clean water. Since the beginning of this year, Republicans in the House have averaged roughly a vote every day the chamber has been in session to undermine the Environmental Protection Agency and our nation's environmental laws. They have picked up the pace recently — just last week they voted to stop the EPA's efforts to limit mercury and other hazardous pollutants from cement plants, boilers and incinerators — and it appears their campaign will continue for the foreseeable future.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2004 | TIM RUTTEN
It's probably no accident that the ancient Greeks invented both democracy and drama. Both, in some elemental way, affirm the value of a people's communal life. The Athenians, for example, regarded a willingness to participate in the civic conversation as one of the irreducible duties of citizenship. "Debate and social groups dedicated to inquiry and discussion are the enemies of tyranny," wrote Aristotle, "since they encourage intelligent thought and trust among citizens." Yeah ...
NATIONAL
July 6, 2009 | Janet Hook
When Congress decides how to pay for President Obama's signature healthcare initiative, some of his strongest political bastions may be footing a heavy bill. And in a political irony, states that went for Obama's Republican rival, Sen. John McCain of Arizona, in 2008 are among those likely to benefit most from Democratic healthcare policies.
NATIONAL
April 11, 2013 | By Seema Mehta and Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
Republican leaders on Thursday focused on one of the most pressing challenges the party faces as it strives to retake the White House in 2016 - its deep and persistent unpopularity among crucial voting groups, such as Latinos and single women. Speaker after speaker told members of the Republican National Committee, meeting in Hollywood, that the party and its candidates needed to be part of those communities not just when elections near, that they needed to highlight areas of shared interest and that they must promote minority and women candidates among their ranks.
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