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Red Tape

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1993
"California Squeeze: The Red-Tape Mummy" (editorial, May 16) was almost on the mark. Your only mistake was to mischaracterize the extent to which red tape is strangling the California economy. We are not just having trouble breathing, we are suffocating. I have to deal with the laws that SB 1082 and SB 919 are intended to fix, and I know something has to be done about the Byzantine system we've burdened ourselves with. Eliminating the duplicative morass in our current system is a good place to start.
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OPINION
April 16, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
When the city of Los Angeles established its "1% for the Arts" program more than two decades ago, the rationale was that commercial and municipal development takes a toll on the visual landscape of the city. To mitigate that, and to contribute to the artistic vitality of the city, developers were required to pay a fee equal to 1% of the construction value. That money was supposed to pay for art in public places. It was a smart idea to set up the Arts Development Fee Trust Fund. But it's dumb not to spend it. A recent audit by City Controller Ron Galperin found that $7.5 million was languishing in the portion of the fund that is bankrolled by developers and earmarked for public art projects, cultural events and performances.
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OPINION
September 22, 2010
With the economy still sputtering more than a year after the official end of the recession, some economists are questioning not only the size and composition of the $787-billion stimulus package that Congress approved in 2009, but also the economic theory behind it. New reports by two California watchdogs, however, suggest another factor in the measure's limited effectiveness: the bureaucratic quicksand that stops local governments from doing anything...
OPINION
March 16, 2014 | The Times editorial board
City government is not necessarily known for its willingness to try new things or move quickly, or its flexibility in issuing permits. Activists and businesses often complain that attempts to beautify their communities get tied up in red tape. But a program from the Los Angeles Department of Transportation offers hope of a new ethos emerging in City Hall, one that empowers neighborhoods and city agencies to experiment with urban design. The program, called "People St," invites community groups to apply for the right to convert a piece of city street into a plaza, a parklet or bike parking for one year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2011 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
After more than 6,600 people overwhelmed volunteers at a free mobile health clinic in Los Angeles last year, California legislators passed a law making it easier for out-of-state medical personnel to assist with future events. But just over a week before the massive clinic returns, the state has failed to adopt regulations needed for the additional volunteers to participate. As a result, only medical personnel licensed in California will be able to treat patients and some people could be turned away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1990
I read with interest the commentary "A Life Is Lost in Tangle of Red Tape," (Feb. 4). It was very unfortunate that Dr. Lidia Everett lost her patient, but she should not look to blame Medicare but her own profession for her death. Her statement that a 10-day stay in the hospital put her family in such dire financial straights that they could no longer afford to spend any more, is an indictment of her profession. Medical care does not deteriorate when a national health care program is in force, if you have dedicated health care professionals that consider the patient's welfare before their financial gains.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
Warning that "this storm is not yet over," President Obama vowed that his administration would pull out all the stops to get aid to those hit by Hurricane Sandy. There is "no excuse for inaction,"  Obama said after a brief unscheduled visit to Red Cross headquarters in Washington.  "I want you to cut through red tape; I want you to cut through the bureaucracy. There is no excuse for inaction at this point. " Obama has jumped off the campaign trail to monitor federal response to the massive storm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1986 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
In wrapping up its report on the Pentagon, the President's Blue Ribbon Commission on Defense Management asserted that the Pentagon was overaudited, overregulated and overoversighted. The military, Chairman David Packard said, must step over so many watchdogs and through so much red tape that it cannot work efficiently. Congress, he said, must stop trying to "micromanage" the Defense Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1992
In 1985, my wife and I purchased a new home. In 1987, we received a supplemental tax bill for $31 for 1984. I wrote the assessor's office that it was in error as we did not purchase our home until 1985. Over the next years, we received more bills for this assessment and each time pointed out to the assessor that the bill was in error. When our lender threatened to establish an impound account, in October, 1991, I personally went to the assessor's office to demand that the assessment be removed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2007 | Dana Parsons
There's a wryness to John Kerr that flatters him. Good thing, because life has not been particularly generous in recent years, dealing him a package of illnesses with long names and ugly intentions. In such moments, wry works well. "I'm metal all over," he says, referring to various titanium inserts for bones that are dying, including a total shoulder replacement. But even that isn't what he means when he refers to "my catastrophe."
OPINION
February 4, 2014 | Jonah Goldberg
Welcome to the "year of action. " In last week's State of the Union address, the president vowed to do whatever he has to to help the economy, even if that means working around Congress: "What I offer tonight is a set of concrete, practical proposals to speed up growth, strengthen the middle class and build new ladders of opportunity into the middle class. Some require congressional action, and I'm eager to work with all of you. But America does not stand still, and neither will I. So wherever and whenever I can take steps without legislation to expand opportunity for more American families, that's what I'm going to do. " The White House has touted the fact the president has a "phone and a pen" and he's not afraid to use them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2013 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
LANARE, Calif. - A bright metal drinking fountain is mounted on the wall in the community center of this tiny town west of Fresno. No one pays it any mind: The water is drawn from a well that has been contaminated with arsenic for years. "Can't drink it, can't cook with it ... about all you can do is flush it," said Ethel Myles, 75, who came to the Central Valley from Arkansas half a century ago to pick cotton. Lanare, like scores of other impoverished California communities where the water is unsafe to drink, could be eligible for a share of hundreds of millions of dollars in federal and state funds to improve drinking water tainted by agricultural use and naturally occurring contaminants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2013 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - California may be stymied for years to come in its efforts to resume executions as a result of a new court ruling, bureaucratic requirements and difficulty obtaining lethal injection drugs, advocates on both sides of the death penalty said Friday. Supporters of capital punishment urged Gov. Brown to challenge a state appeals court's unanimous decision against California's lethal injection protocol, even though an appeal could take years. They also called on the governor to introduce a new single-drug execution method for public vetting.
OPINION
April 28, 2013 | DOYLE McMANUS
Here are three things the Obama administration has done that you probably didn't know about: Ever struggle with those accordion-style rubber sleeves on nozzles at the gas station? The sleeve -- technically a "vapor recovery nozzle" -- was required by the Environmental Protection Agency to keep gasoline vapors from leaking into the air. But most cars and trucks now have technology that does the job better, so last year the EPA abolished the nozzle requirement. Because each sleeve-equipped nozzle can cost as much as $300, the change will save gas stations thousands of dollars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2013 | By Seema Mehta and Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
Jockeying to gain an edge in the mayoral runoff, Wendy Greuel and Eric Garcetti are highlighting plans to create jobs, cut red tape to help businesses and spur the city's economy. Garcetti on Friday discussed economic revitalization at a gourmet-sausage and craft-beer restaurant in Atwater Village, where the centerpiece of the neighborhood used to be a casket shop. Now it's a hipster haven, with a Bikram yoga studio and the trendy farm-to-table eatery Canele. And Greuel, in her first stop Wednesday after winning a spot in the runoff, dropped by an architectural design firm in the San Fernando Valley that faced a series of problems when it tried to build an innovative facility with features like a permeable parking lot. "I'm not going to hire a job czar, I'm going to be the jobs czar," she said.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
Ken Rakusin is frustrated. You would be too. Since 2009, the owner of Gordon Brush Manufacturing Co. has been trying to expand his 51,000-square-foot City of Commerce factory by 20,000 square feet. That would mean a larger factory floor, more office space for the engineers who work with customers to design new products, conference rooms, a spacious cafeteria. It would mean room to expand beyond Rakusin's current workforce of 85. More sales. Higher payroll. More property tax, sales tax, income tax. A $1.5-million investment in construction alone.
WORLD
January 9, 2009 | Ken Ellingwood
Here was a contest no Mexican bureaucrat wanted to win. A months-long quest to identify the most nightmarish examples of Mexico's famously nightmarish red tape ended Thursday with a verdict: The nation's social security agency reigns supreme among government bureaucracies that drive Mexicans nuts. President Felipe Calderon bestowed the dubious honor on the agency as part of a contest to find the country's most useless tramite, or bureaucratic process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2013 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - California may be stymied for years to come in its efforts to resume executions as a result of a new court ruling, bureaucratic requirements and difficulty obtaining lethal injection drugs, advocates on both sides of the death penalty said Friday. Supporters of capital punishment urged Gov. Brown to challenge a state appeals court's unanimous decision against California's lethal injection protocol, even though an appeal could take years. They also called on the governor to introduce a new single-drug execution method for public vetting.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
Warning that "this storm is not yet over," President Obama vowed that his administration would pull out all the stops to get aid to those hit by Hurricane Sandy. There is "no excuse for inaction,"  Obama said after a brief unscheduled visit to Red Cross headquarters in Washington.  "I want you to cut through red tape; I want you to cut through the bureaucracy. There is no excuse for inaction at this point. " Obama has jumped off the campaign trail to monitor federal response to the massive storm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2012 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
A reporter at the Mustang Daily — the student newspaper at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo — wanted a copy of an email for a story. He filed a California Public Records Act request with the chancellor's office in Long Beach but he didn't get it. Why? University officials said that although Sean McMinn's request fell under the law, he would have to pay 20 cents — by check — to have the email forwarded to him. McMinn was working on a story about the university system reminding professors that it was inappropriate and, in some cases, illegal to inform students about how politics, specifically Gov. Jerry Brown's Proposition 30 tax measure, would affect the Cal State system.
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