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Red Tide

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NEWS
January 25, 1987 | Associated Press
Toxic algae, commonly referred to as "red tide," has hit beaches around this island state, officials said Saturday, prompting health officials to ban sailing and swimming.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 2, 2012 | By Elizabeth Tobin
Words matter. Take the term "red tide," which is the popularized way of talking about blooms of harmful marine algae. This common terminology is a misnomer because the blooms are not always red and their movement is largely unrelated to tides. Also, many species of algae that cause red discoloration are not harmful. I am a biological oceanographer, so naturally I focus on my own discipline. But I worry that throughout the sciences we are using inaccurate terminology to describe serious environmental issues.
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NATIONAL
August 25, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The worst red tide in years has shut down shellfish beds in much of Puget Sound and prompted serious public health worries, state officials said Thursday. Expanded beach closures have not reached the heart of Washington state's large farmed shellfish industry, and the state said commercial shellfish on the market have been tested and should be safe to eat. But industry officials worried that more bad news could further damage businesses already reeling from a separate bacterial outbreak.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2011 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
He would be making a list and checking it twice, with the intention of finding out who's been naughty and nice. But first Santa needed a drink. All the Santas did. On Saturday, several hundred St. Nicks gathered in Hollywood for SantaCon 2011, a Twitter-driven all-day-and-into-the-night bar crawl that took place in more than 200 locations worldwide. PHOTOS: SantaCon 2011 People who signed up weren't told until Friday night where the party would begin. "Are we meeting at the North Pole?"
NEWS
October 12, 1986
Hundreds of thousands of fish killed by spreading red tide piled up on Padre Island beaches as a state ban on clam and oyster fishing was extended both ways from Corpus Christi along more than 180 miles of Texas coast. In heavy concentrations, the microorganism imparts a reddish color to seawater, makes clams and oysters poisonous and can kill fish, shrimp and crabs, said Kirk Wiles, who oversees the state Health Department's shellfish program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2000 | GAIL DAVIS
Residents in the Ventura Keys are searching for answers about a red tide, or what scientists call an algae bloom, that is proliferating in the water behind their homes in this marina neighborhood. The thick growth of algae, which can kill marine life, naturally occurs in June and July. This year the amount has been larger than residents and harbor officials have seen in at least 15 years. Many residents say they are concerned the algae are toxic and could harm them or local marine life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2000 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A large red tide is turning the ocean water off Orange County brown by day and luminescent by night. "We've been hearing about it for the last three days," Monica Mazur, an environmental health specialist for the county's Health Care Agency, said Wednesday. The red tide stretches from Santa Barbara to Dana Point, she said, with patches as far south as San Clemente. "We've just had a meeting with people from L.A. and Santa Barbara counties," she said, "and there are reports that it's huge."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
Find a dark spot on the San Diego County coastline after nightfall and you might be treated to a spectacular neon-blue light show. Bioluminescent waves, glowing electric blue as they crash ashore, have been dazzling nighttime beach visitors this week. People have been snapping photos of the otherworldly surf as it has increased in intensity over the last few days. The blue glow is caused by an algae bloom commonly referred to as a red tide. The organisms, phytoplankton called Lingulodinium polyedrum , have bloomed since late August, turning the water brownish-red in the daytime, according to UC San Diego scientists.
NEWS
July 3, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An unusual outbreak of red tide was to blame for the mysterious deaths of a record number of manatees this spring, scientists said. The finding is good news, since it means that the deaths weren't caused by an infectious disease that manatees could spread among themselves or carry to other areas. Red tide is a toxic microorganism that accumulates in shellfish. A similar manatee die-off occurred in 1982.
NEWS
September 26, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A bloom of toxic red tide algae is spreading along the Texas Gulf Coast, shutting down some oyster fishing and killing millions of fish whose rotting remains are fouling beaches. State environmental officials say it's the largest concentration of red tide since 1986, when more than 22 million fish died in four months. . High concentrations of the algae called red tide produce a toxin that kills fish by affecting the central nervous system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
Find a dark spot on the San Diego County coastline after nightfall and you might be treated to a spectacular neon-blue light show. Bioluminescent waves, glowing electric blue as they crash ashore, have been dazzling nighttime beach visitors this week. People have been snapping photos of the otherworldly surf as it has increased in intensity over the last few days. The blue glow is caused by an algae bloom commonly referred to as a red tide. The organisms, phytoplankton called Lingulodinium polyedrum , have bloomed since late August, turning the water brownish-red in the daytime, according to UC San Diego scientists.
NATIONAL
August 25, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The worst red tide in years has shut down shellfish beds in much of Puget Sound and prompted serious public health worries, state officials said Thursday. Expanded beach closures have not reached the heart of Washington state's large farmed shellfish industry, and the state said commercial shellfish on the market have been tested and should be safe to eat. But industry officials worried that more bad news could further damage businesses already reeling from a separate bacterial outbreak.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2006 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
All Susan Leydon has to do is stick her head outside and take a deep breath of sea air. She can tell if her 10-year-old son is about to get sick. If she coughs or feels a tickle in the back of her throat, she lays down the law: No playing on the beach. No, not even in the yard. Come back inside. Now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2005 | Sara Lin, Times Staff Writer
Surfer T.K. Brimer thinks it's a bummer when this summer's persistent red tide turns his favorite Newport Beach surfing spot the color of root beer and leaves his wetsuit reeking. The red tide goes away for a day or two, but it always comes back. From Santa Barbara to San Diego, a dogged red tide has clung for nearly four months to Southern California's coastline like sticky gum on a shoe. Surfers are tired of paddling through sludge, and beachgoers have seen enough murky water.
NATIONAL
July 2, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Shellfishermen headed back to the flats off Chatham and several other towns after a toxic red tide receded and the state reopened shellfish beds for the first time in five weeks. "It'll be nice to make some money after 30 days or so not working," said Jonathan Buck, 24, as he unloaded gear from the back of his family's truck. The openings in seven coastal communities followed the worst red tide to spread through New England waters in 30 years.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2005 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
Every day this time of year, Vicki Cisco and Herbert Moon leave home at dawn and take their 14-foot aluminum skiff to a nearby tidal flat. Starting when the tide is lowest, they squat in the mud for six hours, digging for clams with gloved hands and pitchforks adapted to serve as hoes. In a normal season, the couple bring in $300 to $400 a day, enough to see them through the harsh winter months.
NATIONAL
June 7, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Officials closed two areas off Martha's Vineyard to shellfishing as the largest red tide outbreak in decades continued to spread through New England waters. The toxic algae bloom already has forced officials to shut down shellfish beds from Maine to Cape Cod so that people do not eat tainted clams, mussels and oysters.
NEWS
August 25, 1985 | United Press International
Massachusetts environmental officials closed shellfishing grounds from Manchester to the New Hampshire state line Friday because of contamination from red tide, an algae that can sicken humans who eat shellfish that have fed on it.
NATIONAL
June 10, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Gov. Mitt Romney declared a state of emergency because of the red tide bloom off the coast, a move that allowed the state to seek federal disaster aid for the shellfish industry. Red tide is an algae that contaminates shellfish and can be dangerous to humans who eat the shellfish. It does not pose a risk to people who eat lobsters or finned fish. The governor said in Boston that he was seeking aid from the U.S. Small Business Administration and the Department of Labor.
NATIONAL
June 7, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Officials closed two areas off Martha's Vineyard to shellfishing as the largest red tide outbreak in decades continued to spread through New England waters. The toxic algae bloom already has forced officials to shut down shellfish beds from Maine to Cape Cod so that people do not eat tainted clams, mussels and oysters.
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