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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
"John Carter's" journey into Redbox kiosks may be as complicated as a flight to Mars. Walt Disney Studios has decided to not sell its DVDs to any rental outlets, including Redbox, Netflix and Blockbuster, until 28 days after they go on sale. Disney previously offered its DVDs to Redbox the same day they went on sale at retail stores and online. The policy change began with the studio's release of the Japanese animation movie "The Secret World of Arrietty" on May 22, a studio spokeswoman confirmed, but has gained widespread notice this week as it is applying to the high-profile flop "John Carter.
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BUSINESS
March 13, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the nation's largest retailer, is providing a big boost to Hollywood's effort to persuade consumers to keep buying movies in the digital age. Wal-Mart on Tuesday threw its support behind the industry's UltraViolet program and unveiled an exclusive arrangement with five of Hollywood's top studios to convert people's DVD collections into digital copies. Starting next month, consumers will be able to take their DVDs to about 3,500 Wal-Mart stores and leave with a digital copy stored in the cloud - a storage system offering access from a broad array of Internet-connected devices - for $2 each.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2012 | Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Universal Pictures has decided not to join forces withWarner Bros.in that studio's war with Redbox. Universal, the studio behind "Safe House"and this weekend's animated release "Dr. Seuss' The Lorax,"on Thursday announced an extension of its deal with the DVD rental kiosk company through August 2014 that will maintain the current 28-day wait from when DVDs go on sale until consumers can rent them from Redbox. The news comes two months after rival studio Warner Bros. said it would only sell discs to Redbox if it agreed to double the length of the so-called rental "window" to 56 days.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Redbox is hooking up with Verizon Communications Inc. as part of a major step forward to compete with Netflix Inc. in both the digital and physical worlds. The company famous for its ubiquitous red DVD rentals kiosks announced Monday that it would form a joint venture with telecom giant Verizon to create an online movie subscription service. Redbox also agreed to spend up to $100 million to acquire the Blockbuster-branded DVD kiosks operated by NCR Corp., its largest competitor in that business, adding about 9,000 machines to its existing base of 35,400.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Warner Bros. is about to reignite a battle with Redbox and Blockbuster over how long consumers have to wait to rent DVDs. The Time Warner Inc.-owned studio is instituting a new policy that all DVD rental services must wait 56 days from the time the disc goes on sale at retail stores like Wal-Mart and Best Buy until consumers can rent them, according to people with knowledge of the matter who were not authorized to discuss it publicly. That's double the current 28-day "window. " A spokesman for Warner Bros.' home entertainment division declined to comment.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Warner Bros. and Redbox are about to re-ignite a battle over how long consumers have to wait to rent DVDs. The Time Warner Inc.-owned studio is instituting a new policy that all DVD rental outlets must wait 56 days from the time the disc goes on sale at retail outlets Wal-Mart and Best Buy until consumers can rent them, according to people with knowledge of the matter who were not authorized to discuss it publicly. That's double the current 28-day "window. " A spokesman for Warner Bros.' home entertainment division declined to comment.
BUSINESS
December 29, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Big-budget sequels ruled the box office this year, but it was romantic comedies that topped rentals at red kiosks. The Adam Sandler-Jennifer Aniston comedy "Just Go With It" was the most rented movie at Redbox kiosks in 2011, according to new data released by the $1-per-night DVD company. Right behind was the Ashton Kutcher-Natalie Portman romantic comedy "No Strings Attached. " All of the top five movies were those intended to make audiences laugh, a list that also included the animated comedy "Rango," the romantic comedy "The Dilemma" and the buddy comedy "Due Date.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Say goodbye to $1-per-night DVD rentals. Kiosk rental company Redbox said Thursday it is raising its standard price to $1.20 a day to cope with rising costs. Blu-ray disc rentals will cost $2 a day, up from from $1.50. The company's first price increase since it launched eight years ago comes as Redbox reported strong results for its third quarter ended Sept. 30, possibly fueled by the gaffes of its primary competitor, subscription service Netflix. Redbox revenue during the quarter jumped 28% from a year earlier to $389.8 million, while operating income rose 56% to $83.5 million.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2011 | Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
In five years, buying and watching movies at home will be a very different experience than it is today. Here's what a film fan's living room might look like in 2016: Movies in the 'cloud' — Purchasing "Transformers 5" won't just mean taking home a DVD or downloading a file, but having the right to watch it on any digital device. With virtually every television, tablet and smartphone connected to the Internet, all it will take is a login and password to view a movie you've bought.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2011 | Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Across Hollywood, a quiet revolution is brewing that's about to transform living rooms around the world. After desperate attempts to prop up the industry's once-thriving DVD business, studio executives now believe the only hope of turning around a 40% decline in home entertainment revenue lies in rapidly accelerating the delivery of movies over the Internet. In the next few years, the growing number of consumers with Internet-connected televisions, tablets and smartphones will face a dizzying array of options designed to make digital movie consumption a lot more convenient and to entice users to spend more money.
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