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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Call it "Long Day's Journey Into Intermission. " Or maybe "Waiting ... and Waiting ... and Waiting for Godot. " It is the marathon play or performance piece, the theatrical equivalent of the Tour de France or the nine-course prix fixe menu at the French Laundry. Done poorly it can seem like an endurance test or a stunt. Done brilliantly it can be transformational for those putting on the show as well as those watching it. Its exemplars are monumental, magisterial works like the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of "Nicholas Nickleby," based on Charles Dickens' 1839 novel, which clocked in at 81/2 hours in two parts (dinner break included)
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By Lewis Segal
A horrific, unforgettable action painting of male energy, intimacy and agony, the collaborative, partly improvisational “Them” comes to the REDCAT at Walt Disney Concert Hall as a reminder of the fierce beauty of contemporary dance - even contemporary dance backdated by more than a quarter-century.  Created in 1986, "Them" has been reconstructed into the award-winning version that opened Thursday for a four-performance run (through Sunday)....
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012
STAGE A restaging of the powerful 1986 piece of dance theater called "Them," which won the Bessie Award last year, is making its West Coast premiere. "Them" explores the harrowing topic of AIDS and its devastating effects on both body and soul. The original dancers are joined by a cast of six new young men. REDCAT, 631 W. 2nd St., L.A. 8:30 p.m. Thu. to Sat. 7 p.m. Sun. Prices vary. http://www.redcat.org.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012
The composer Raymond Scott shaped a generation of young minds with his scores for popular cartoons of the era. But he was also an early electronic-music pioneer, and at this show members of Oingo Boingo re-create some of his best work and unravel the legacy of a musician whose vision helped define early pop. REDCAT, 631 W. 2nd St., L.A. 8:30 p.m. Fri. $20. redcat.org.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
Few cultural aficionados today recognize Raymond Scott's name. But if you've ever watched a Looney Tunes cartoon, or an episode of "The Ren & Stimpy Show," or "The Simpsons," you've likely heard some of his antic, polyrhythmically perverse, one-of-a-kind music. And if you're a musical-techno gear geek, you may use state-of-the-art sound-making and noise-processing equipment that Scott, a prolific inventor, helped pioneer in the days of reel-to-reel tape recorders and UNIVAC computers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Sharon Mizota
Tony Cokes' short videos, currently on view at REDCAT, expose the hypocrisy of consumer culture, the navel-gazing of the art world and the malfeasance of American politics. But they are a hard sell, often composed of little more than screen after screen of text set to music, and if you're lucky, some heavily processed images.  It's as if Cokes hit on a formula in the late 1980s and never looked back, filling his works with lengthy lists of facts, quotes and musings. The REDCAT exhibition includes 45 works from the last decade or so, divided into eight themed groups.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2012
The day the butterflies were set free in Mark Z. Danielewski's West Hollywood apartment, music was playing, sewing machines were running and swaths of fabric with carefully stitched illustrations for the new edition of his novella "The Fifty Year Sword" were strewn around his living room. He'd painted one wall with magnetic chalkboard paint for sketching patterns and thrown out his couch to make room for the friends who joined his literary sewing circle - though at times, he admits, it seemed more like a literary sweatshop.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
The sacrificial piano sat stage right during German band Faust's concert at REDCAT. It was a church basement clunker, a blond-wooded upright with broken-tooth keys and a chipped veneer. Whatever sacred beauty it delivered in better days, the piano was now doomed, sentenced to death by a band that 40 years ago helped transform the direction of experimental rock and noise music with transfixing grooves and an abundance of free-spirited, Dada-inspired non sequiturs. In the first of two Friday-night performances at the Roy and Edna Disney/CalArts Theater in downtown L.A., the four-piece version of a band co-founded in 1970 by, among others, current members Jean-Hervé Péron and percussionist Werner "Zappi" Diermaier, delivered art-damaged (quite literally)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
When groundbreaking art-rock group Faust arrives at REDCAT on Friday night for two performances, it'll be armed with a fascinating arsenal of "instruments," according to an email REDCAT published Wednesday night.  The group rose up in Germany in the early 1970s among other so-called krautrock bands that helped set the path for avant-garde rock and electronic dance music, including Kraftwerk, Can, Neu!, Amon Duul and Tangerine Dream. In the decades since, Faust has continued to explore, as evidenced by the items its members have requested from REDCAT.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Susan King
The 16th annual Hollywood Film Festival (of which the Los Angeles Times is a sponsor) screens Friday through Sunday at the ArcLight Cinemas in Hollywood. It opens with "Garbage," directed by Phil Voken, about two trashmen who find Cuba Gooding Jr.'s Oscar in their collections. Other films in the festival include "Caroline and Jackie," with Marguerite Moreau; "I Will Follow You in the Dark," starring Mischa Barton;  Bernard Rose's "Two  Jacks," with Danny and Jack Huston; "Hello Herman," starring Norman Reedus of "The Walking Dead"; and the documentary "Bound by Flesh," directed by Leslie Zemeckis, the wife of Oscar-winning director Robert Zemeckis.
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