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BUSINESS
July 17, 2004 | From Associated Press
Tenet Healthcare Inc. said Friday it had completed the sale of its troubled Redding Medical Center to North Carolina-based Hospital Partners of America. Tenet said gross proceeds of the sale of the 246-bed hospital, including the property and equipment, came to about $55 million. Net, after-tax proceeds, including leftover working capital, will come to about $57 million, Tenet said. The proceeds will remain with a Tenet subsidiary, Redding Medical Center Inc.
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BUSINESS
November 16, 2005 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
Federal prosecutors said Tuesday that they lacked evidence to bring criminal charges against physicians implicated in an alleged scheme to perform hundreds of unnecessary open-heart surgeries at a Redding hospital formerly operated by troubled Tenet Healthcare Corp. Instead, they agreed to settle civil claims, including allegations of improper billing, in exchange for $1.4 million each from cardiologist Chae Hyun Moon and surgeon Fidel Realyvasquez, and $250,000 from another surgeon.
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BUSINESS
August 23, 2003 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
Tenet Healthcare Corp. said Friday that its Redding Medical Center would resume treating heart patients, and named a new director for the facility's troubled cardiac program. The Santa Barbara-based company also appointed a new chief executive for the center in Redding, which had been one of Tenet's most profitable hospitals because of an unusually high volume of heart procedures performed there.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2004 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
Tenet Healthcare Corp. said Tuesday that it would pay $395 million to settle lawsuits alleging that doctors at its former hospital in Redding performed unnecessary cardiac procedures on more than 750 patients. The settlement, finalized late Monday, requires Tenet to set up a fund by Dec. 31 to compensate patients treated at Redding Medical Center. In the last two years, the Tenet hospital chain has been rocked with legal problems, including an October 2002 FBI raid of the Redding hospital.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2004 | Debora Vrana, Times Staff Writer
The two whistle-blowers who reported that alleged unnecessary heart surgeries were performed at Redding Medical Center in Northern California will receive $8.1 million, the federal government announced Wednesday. The award will be paid to Father John Corapi, 56, a Catholic priest who lives in Montana, and Joseph Zerga, 61, a Las Vegas accountant. The payout comes from a $54-million settlement reached in August with the hospital's owner, Santa Barbara-based Tenet Healthcare Corp.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2003 | Ronald D. White
The California Medical Board has accused a doctor, suspected of performing unnecessary surgeries, of insurance fraud, gross negligence, dishonest or corrupt acts and incompetence, a board official said Thursday. Dr. Chae Hyun Moon, former head of the cardiology department at Tenet Healthcare Corp.'s Redding Medical Center in Redding, Calif., faces a hearing before an administrative law judge, the medical board said. Moon's office and that of heart surgeon Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2001 | From Times Staff, Wire Reports
River otters attacked a 17-year-old houseboat vacationer in Redding, biting and puncturing her skin more than 30 times. The severity of Monday's assault was unprecedented, wildlife officials said, though three major incidents involving otters have been reported at Shasta Lake in the last month. Erin Vanduzer was taken to Redding Medical Center, where she received more than 40 stitches, a U.S. Forest Service spokesman said. She is also receiving rabies treatments.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal authorities are investigating whether two doctors at a Tenet Healthcare Corp. hospital in Northern California performed numerous unneeded heart procedures on Medicare patients since late 1998. In an affidavit, FBI agent Michael Skeen said the two doctors who practice at Redding Medical Center did unusually heavy volume of heart catheterization and other coronary procedures, of which as many as half may have been unnecessary, based on other doctor estimates.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2003 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Senate Finance Committee has asked Tenet Healthcare Corp. for documents relating to alleged unnecessary medical procedures and other practices, the Santa Barbara hospital operator said Friday. Tenet said it received a letter from Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa), the committee chairman, saying the panel was examining Tenet's "corporate governance practices with respect to federal health-care programs."
BUSINESS
November 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
U.S. Sen. Chuck E. Grassley, chairman of the Committee on Finance, has requested an investigation into charges that physicians at a hospital owned by Tenet Healthcare Corp. performed unnecessary surgeries and the facility billed the federal government for them. Grassley (R-Iowa) made the request Friday to the Office of the Inspector General at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2004 | From Associated Press
Tenet Healthcare Inc. said Friday it had completed the sale of its troubled Redding Medical Center to North Carolina-based Hospital Partners of America. Tenet said gross proceeds of the sale of the 246-bed hospital, including the property and equipment, came to about $55 million. Net, after-tax proceeds, including leftover working capital, will come to about $57 million, Tenet said. The proceeds will remain with a Tenet subsidiary, Redding Medical Center Inc.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2004 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
Tenet Healthcare Corp. said Friday that it had agreed to sell the Redding Medical Center to a private company whose partners include a group of local doctors. The Santa Barbara-based company put the Redding hospital up for sale last year after doctors were accused of performing hundreds of allegedly unnecessary heart surgeries at the facility. Hospital Partners of America Inc., a privately held Charlotte, N.C.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2004 | Debora Vrana, Times Staff Writer
The two whistle-blowers who reported that alleged unnecessary heart surgeries were performed at Redding Medical Center in Northern California will receive $8.1 million, the federal government announced Wednesday. The award will be paid to Father John Corapi, 56, a Catholic priest who lives in Montana, and Joseph Zerga, 61, a Las Vegas accountant. The payout comes from a $54-million settlement reached in August with the hospital's owner, Santa Barbara-based Tenet Healthcare Corp.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
U.S. Sen. Chuck E. Grassley, chairman of the Committee on Finance, has requested an investigation into charges that physicians at a hospital owned by Tenet Healthcare Corp. performed unnecessary surgeries and the facility billed the federal government for them. Grassley (R-Iowa) made the request Friday to the Office of the Inspector General at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2003 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Senate Finance Committee has asked Tenet Healthcare Corp. for documents relating to alleged unnecessary medical procedures and other practices, the Santa Barbara hospital operator said Friday. Tenet said it received a letter from Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa), the committee chairman, saying the panel was examining Tenet's "corporate governance practices with respect to federal health-care programs."
BUSINESS
September 5, 2003 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
Tenet Healthcare Corp. said Thursday that its Redding Medical Center faced an exclusion from Medicare and other federal health programs, which would result in the loss of nearly half of the hospital's net patient revenue. Redding Medical, where two doctors have been accused of performing unnecessary heart surgeries, could become the first hospital not convicted of a crime to be barred from the Medicare and Medicaid programs.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Police have arrested a 78-year-old woman for investigation of attempted murder in what they say was the mercy killing of her elderly husband. Audrey L. Kielpinski was arrested Sunday immediately after her husband, Kash Kielpinski, 83, was shot with a .22-caliber pistol in his room at Redding Medical Center. He was recovering from a stroke and brain surgery when his wife walked into his room shortly after 6 p.m. and shot him, said Redding Police Lt. Chuck Byard. He died at 1:10 a.m.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2003 | Debora Vrana and Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writers
Tenet Healthcare Corp., California's largest hospital chain, agreed Wednesday to pay $54 million to settle government allegations that two doctors at its hospital in Northern California performed numerous unnecessary heart surgeries. As part of its settlement with the U.S. Justice Department, Santa Barbara-based Tenet said it would put in place new procedures for doctors and staff who work at Redding Medical Center.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2003 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
Tenet Healthcare Corp. said Friday that its Redding Medical Center would resume treating heart patients, and named a new director for the facility's troubled cardiac program. The Santa Barbara-based company also appointed a new chief executive for the center in Redding, which had been one of Tenet's most profitable hospitals because of an unusually high volume of heart procedures performed there.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2003
Fed Leaves Rate at 45-Year Low The Federal Reserve sent a stronger message that it wouldn't be raising short-term interest rates anytime soon, hoping to give the economy a chance to build up a substantial head of steam. That was more bad news for Americans who rely on income from bank accounts and money market funds, though it could help owners of stocks and bonds.
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