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Redemption Value

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OPINION
November 1, 2002
Wow, that Oct. 27 letter, "Trashing the Law," ridiculing California's use of the redemption value in its recycling system, really raised my blood pressure. How long will it take us to realize that we cannot be a throwaway society forever? This Earth's resources are finite. People of conscience take recycling seriously and campaign to have more containers added to the redemption program. Jean Holt Koch Los Angeles
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2014 | By Gale Holland
Francisco Morataya drives a vanload of empty bottles and cans to Victar Recycling Center in Echo Park every week or so to supplement his wages as an office janitor. The 61-year-old Eagle Rock resident had been making $200 per load, enough to pay his daughter's cellphone bill. But that was before a new state law tightened the redemption rules, making it harder for people at the economic fringes to scrape by. Now his take is only $50 to $60, Morataya said. "It's really bad," he said this week, flinging plastic bottles into a garbage bin. "I can't help my daughter.
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OPINION
October 27, 2002
The recent arrests of 14 suspects for defrauding the state's recycling redemption system illustrates the absurdity of a program that is a de facto beverage tax (Oct. 23). How many of us actually redeem the 2.5 to 5 cents for our bottles and cans? We don't object to this insidious little number because it's so small, and we don't redeem it because it's not worth our effort. This, presumably, is by design. Is it doing what it purports; i.e., to encourage recycling? Not for the vast majority of Californians.
OPINION
October 11, 2012
Re "Recycling fraud costs state millions," Oct. 7 At my local recycling center, a man said to me that he made roughly $25 every few days from recycling aluminum cans. "Tax free!," he proclaimed. He was not a rich man, nor did it seem likely that he had a job or a home. You get 5 cents for each can. This redemption value is the very reason that my own recycle bin at home, the blue trash can, is scoured every Sunday night. If recycling cans can help those in need and the environment, then why make the process any harder?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1989
Pooh on the petulant lady who writes from Santa Monica that she objects to raising the redemption value on bottles and cans because it will only encourage what she calls the "scavengers" who, she complains, awaken her by noisy rummaging in trash bins for bottles and cans. Wrong on every count. Instead of whining about these poor souls who earn a few pennies from dumpster diving, why doesn't she do something? The city of Santa Monica has an excellent recycling program. Not only are there bins in many locations, but the city will actually pick up recyclables at your home on set schedules.
OPINION
October 11, 2012
Re "Recycling fraud costs state millions," Oct. 7 At my local recycling center, a man said to me that he made roughly $25 every few days from recycling aluminum cans. "Tax free!," he proclaimed. He was not a rich man, nor did it seem likely that he had a job or a home. You get 5 cents for each can. This redemption value is the very reason that my own recycle bin at home, the blue trash can, is scoured every Sunday night. If recycling cans can help those in need and the environment, then why make the process any harder?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1999
According to "Expanded Bottle Deposit Needed" (editorial, Aug. 16), we should start redeeming empty bottles and cans at the check stand. Do you have any idea what John Q. Public actually returns for redemption? Boxes and boxes, bags and bags, full of sticky containers, dirty, with insects and spider webs, not to mention broken glass and tin cans. And you believe they should be returned to the check stand, where meats, fresh fruits and vegetables roll on the conveyor. Can you imagine waiting in line behind someone who can't decide whether to use his or her ATM or credit card, then decides to write a check with no identification and then stops to count returns?
HOME & GARDEN
February 7, 2008 | Janet Eastman
DO your kids enjoy the box more than the toy that came in it? Then they might appreciate the possibilities of a new drink bottle conceived by noted industrial designer Yves Behar. Chubby knobs make it easy for little hands to hold the new Y Water. After the vitamin-infused beverage is consumed (or spilled), the 9-ounce plastic bottles can be refilled, recycled or, better yet, played with.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1997 | Steve Harvey
Californians emigrating to the state of Washington still aren't being welcomed with hugs and kisses, evidently. An ex-Angeleno, living in the Northwest, asked Ross Noll to relay a joke making the rounds up there. A Texan, a Californian and a Seattleite are in a bar. The Texan throws a bottle of tequila into the air and shoots it with a pistol. He explains that Texas has plenty of tequila. The Californian throws a bottle of wine into the air and shoots it with a pistol.
NEWS
May 17, 1988 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
Three recycling companies that operate most of California's 2,400 redemption centers have been forced to close several because the public is not returning enough aluminum cans, glass bottles and plastic containers under the state's new anti-litter law. Industry spokesmen said the problem is simple--the redemption value of 1 cent for each container is not enough to insure profitability or to motivate consumers to turn in the containers.
HOME & GARDEN
February 7, 2008 | Janet Eastman
DO your kids enjoy the box more than the toy that came in it? Then they might appreciate the possibilities of a new drink bottle conceived by noted industrial designer Yves Behar. Chubby knobs make it easy for little hands to hold the new Y Water. After the vitamin-infused beverage is consumed (or spilled), the 9-ounce plastic bottles can be refilled, recycled or, better yet, played with.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2007 | Tami Abdollah, Times Staff Writer
Diane Schoolsky is a recycling pro. She opens up the hatchback trunk of her silver Prius in the Ralphs parking lot near Hancock Park, and quickly sets about relieving it of 11 paper bags and two white garbage bags that overflow onto her back seat. The pickings represent 12 days worth of recyclables, for which she earned about $22. Schoolsky, 60, has done this for decades. "It's a good way to recoup money you're already shelling out," she said.
OPINION
November 1, 2002
Wow, that Oct. 27 letter, "Trashing the Law," ridiculing California's use of the redemption value in its recycling system, really raised my blood pressure. How long will it take us to realize that we cannot be a throwaway society forever? This Earth's resources are finite. People of conscience take recycling seriously and campaign to have more containers added to the redemption program. Jean Holt Koch Los Angeles
OPINION
October 27, 2002
The recent arrests of 14 suspects for defrauding the state's recycling redemption system illustrates the absurdity of a program that is a de facto beverage tax (Oct. 23). How many of us actually redeem the 2.5 to 5 cents for our bottles and cans? We don't object to this insidious little number because it's so small, and we don't redeem it because it's not worth our effort. This, presumably, is by design. Is it doing what it purports; i.e., to encourage recycling? Not for the vast majority of Californians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1999
According to "Expanded Bottle Deposit Needed" (editorial, Aug. 16), we should start redeeming empty bottles and cans at the check stand. Do you have any idea what John Q. Public actually returns for redemption? Boxes and boxes, bags and bags, full of sticky containers, dirty, with insects and spider webs, not to mention broken glass and tin cans. And you believe they should be returned to the check stand, where meats, fresh fruits and vegetables roll on the conveyor. Can you imagine waiting in line behind someone who can't decide whether to use his or her ATM or credit card, then decides to write a check with no identification and then stops to count returns?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1997 | Steve Harvey
Californians emigrating to the state of Washington still aren't being welcomed with hugs and kisses, evidently. An ex-Angeleno, living in the Northwest, asked Ross Noll to relay a joke making the rounds up there. A Texan, a Californian and a Seattleite are in a bar. The Texan throws a bottle of tequila into the air and shoots it with a pistol. He explains that Texas has plenty of tequila. The Californian throws a bottle of wine into the air and shoots it with a pistol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2007 | Tami Abdollah, Times Staff Writer
Diane Schoolsky is a recycling pro. She opens up the hatchback trunk of her silver Prius in the Ralphs parking lot near Hancock Park, and quickly sets about relieving it of 11 paper bags and two white garbage bags that overflow onto her back seat. The pickings represent 12 days worth of recyclables, for which she earned about $22. Schoolsky, 60, has done this for decades. "It's a good way to recoup money you're already shelling out," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2014 | By Gale Holland
Francisco Morataya drives a vanload of empty bottles and cans to Victar Recycling Center in Echo Park every week or so to supplement his wages as an office janitor. The 61-year-old Eagle Rock resident had been making $200 per load, enough to pay his daughter's cellphone bill. But that was before a new state law tightened the redemption rules, making it harder for people at the economic fringes to scrape by. Now his take is only $50 to $60, Morataya said. "It's really bad," he said this week, flinging plastic bottles into a garbage bin. "I can't help my daughter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1989
Pooh on the petulant lady who writes from Santa Monica that she objects to raising the redemption value on bottles and cans because it will only encourage what she calls the "scavengers" who, she complains, awaken her by noisy rummaging in trash bins for bottles and cans. Wrong on every count. Instead of whining about these poor souls who earn a few pennies from dumpster diving, why doesn't she do something? The city of Santa Monica has an excellent recycling program. Not only are there bins in many locations, but the city will actually pick up recyclables at your home on set schedules.
NEWS
May 17, 1988 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
Three recycling companies that operate most of California's 2,400 redemption centers have been forced to close several because the public is not returning enough aluminum cans, glass bottles and plastic containers under the state's new anti-litter law. Industry spokesmen said the problem is simple--the redemption value of 1 cent for each container is not enough to insure profitability or to motivate consumers to turn in the containers.
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