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Redgrave Lynn

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February 10, 1999 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark Urman remembers first setting his sights on an Oscar for Ian McKellen, star of "Gods and Monsters," at last year's Cannes Film Festival. The fact that Urman's newly born company, Lions Gate Films Releasing, hadn't bought the film yet only sharpened his appetite. "The whole architecture of our Oscar campaign was planned out before we acquired the film last June," said Urman, a longtime publicist before he became co-president of Lions Gate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1999 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark Urman remembers first setting his sights on an Oscar for Ian McKellen, star of "Gods and Monsters," at last year's Cannes Film Festival. The fact that Urman's newly born company, Lions Gate Films Releasing, hadn't bought the film yet only sharpened his appetite. "The whole architecture of our Oscar campaign was planned out before we acquired the film last June," said Urman, a longtime publicist before he became co-president of Lions Gate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1991 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Should movie classics be remade at all? Sometimes--if, like the made-for-TV version of Robert Aldrich's 1962 Hollywood Grand Guignol shocker, "What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?"--different spins can be found for the material.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Jane Austen never married, possibly never received so much as a passionate kiss, and formed her closest emotional bonds with her spinster older sister. Yet, in one of the enduring mysteries of genius, few writers have had a more acute sense of romantic psychology, or had more piercing insights into the relationship of people in love. No place in the human heart was unknown to her, which is why her popularity not only endures, but increases. Especially in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND
Standing back-to-back in a publicity photo for the film "Patty Hearst" are two daughters from different sorts of privilege--Patricia Hearst Shaw and the actress who's playing her in a new film, Natasha Richardson. That the pair--who already resemble each other physically--are coiffed and dressed alike reinforces their shared ground, and highlights their differences. One is the scion of one of America's most famous media families, the Hearsts.
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