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OPINION
June 28, 2010 | Gregory Rodriguez
Irascible rednecks are nothing new in politics. Once upon a time, they tended to be either marginal firebrands like George Wallace or, more recently, the ne'er-do-well, embarrassing siblings of well-educated Southern pols — think Billy Carter or even Roger Clinton. But nowadays they seem to be the mainstream politicians themselves. In April, Haley Barbour, governor of Mississippi, former national GOP chairman and potential 2012 presidential candidate, referred to himself as "a fat redneck" on CNN's "John King USA."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2014 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
Being a redneck during a zombie apocalypse can be hazardous to your health. Remaining among the living often depends on overcoming the traditional redneck worldview. One challenge is to recognize the urgent need to work, play and kill well with others of different races and ethnicities. Another is remembering that flesh-eating zombies come in all colors, even white. For survivalist Daryl Dixon of AMC's "The Walking Dead," which returns Sunday for the second half of its fourth season, these were life lessons learned the hard way. Dixon's ability to grow beyond the limits of a childhood of neglect and poverty - not to mention his pinpoint accuracy with a crossbow and sex appeal - has made him one of the most popular characters on the most popular scripted show on television.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2014 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
Being a redneck during a zombie apocalypse can be hazardous to your health. Remaining among the living often depends on overcoming the traditional redneck worldview. One challenge is to recognize the urgent need to work, play and kill well with others of different races and ethnicities. Another is remembering that flesh-eating zombies come in all colors, even white. For survivalist Daryl Dixon of AMC's "The Walking Dead," which returns Sunday for the second half of its fourth season, these were life lessons learned the hard way. Dixon's ability to grow beyond the limits of a childhood of neglect and poverty - not to mention his pinpoint accuracy with a crossbow and sex appeal - has made him one of the most popular characters on the most popular scripted show on television.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2013 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
The singing vegetarian wanted nothing to do with the backwoods ducks. When Morrissey was scheduled to appear on Jimmy Kimmel's late-night show last month along with the cast of A&E's "Duck Dynasty," the '80s cult rocker issued an ultimatum: Boot the "animal serial killers," as he described the Southern family that made its fortune selling duck-hunting paraphernalia, from the guest list or he would walk. When showtime came, Kimmel's choice was clear. Rednecks 1, Rocker 0. "They have guns," joked the ABC talk-show host in explaining his rationale for standing by the ducky ones.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | By Robert Abele
Set in an East Texas work prison in 1976, the turgid indie "Cellmates" pairs an incarcerated Klan bigwig (Tom Sizemore) with a happy-go-lucky Mexican fieldworker (Hector Jimenez). The bigot endures the lectures of a potato-farming-obsessed warden (Stacy Keach, full throttle) and falls for a pretty Latina maid (Olga Segura). Really, you can't blame Sizemore for turning the simplest physical movement or line of dialogue into a hoedown of over-gesturing. Co-writer/director Jesse Baget's incessantly talky mix of faux-Coens-style redneck grandiloquence and un-Coens-like visual flatness leaves the fidgety star trapped in garish close-up for most of the film.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1989
I read, with complete distaste, Tom Clancy's column on terrorism ("Cowardly Impotence Reigns," Op-Ed Page, Aug. 2). I must say that his opinion is as reptilian as his redneck novels. His shoot-em-up Teddy Roosevelt mentality totally ignores the reasoning that leads to these atrocities. These terrorists, depending on your viewpoint, reacted to an act of kidnap. Surely the Israelis, super strategists that they are, knew something like this was likely. Clancy implies that our reaction should be similar to the KGB, who mutilated a man to get Soviet citizens returned.
NEWS
July 22, 1987 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
Whenever Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Sweet Home Alabama" comes on the jukebox at Gary Epps' favorite bar here--a redneck hangout on the fringe of downtown--Epps has to fight back the urge to go over and stomp holes into the speakers. Epps, a 29-year-old "Southerner by birth but Georgian by the grace of God," cannot stand Alabama or anything about the state and its people. "They're the most screwed-up people on earth. They ain't nothing like Georgians.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1991 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What with the stupid macho posturing of Andrew Dice Clay and the bombastic assaults of shock-radio's Howard Stern, these days Sam Kinison might seem an afterthought, almost quaint. OK, quaint is probably too soft a word for the loudest of the loud, the original foul-mouth who's offended just about everybody, especially women and homosexuals, along his screaming way. But the competition is heavy for entertainers with attitudes engaging in public one-upsmanship.
NEWS
May 8, 1989 | CAROLYN SEE
Tangled Up in Blue by Larry Duplechan (St. Martin's Press: $16.95; 288 pages) "Tangled Up in Blue" is so tangled up in a web of blurb-misrepresentation that it will be a wonder if it ever finds its real audience. On the other hand, this book is so primitively written, so cliche-ridden, that that might not be a total misfortune. That, in turn, brings up another question: Must sexual and sociological matters always be dealt with in the loftiest prose? Must ill-educated human beings be denied literature that speaks their own language?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1985 | TERRY ATKINSON
Thanks to his show on cable television's Nashville Network, Bobby Bare is becoming known more as an interviewer of country singers than as a singer himself. But he still performs too, thank goodness. The Ohio-born veteran's "outlaw" vocal style isn't outstanding, but he's one heck of an entertainer in his own sly way, as the first of two shows Friday night at the Palomino testified.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2013 | By Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week of Jan. 27 - Feb. 2, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SERIES The Graham Norton Show:   Denzel Washington, Nicholas Hoult and Bill Bailey appear on the comedy variety series (7:15 and 10:15 p.m. BBC America). Saturday Night Live:   Adam Levine hosts with musical guest Kendrick Lamar (11:29 p.m. NBC). SPECIALS Maz Jobrani : I Come in Peace: This new special features the Iranian-American comic's spot-on observations about race relations, Islamophobia and more (8:30 p.m. Showtime)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2012 | By August Brown, Los Angeles Times
On election night,, Kid Rock did something unusual, even for him. The Southern rock-rapper, a famed party monster whose annual Chillin' the Most cruise concert is an Olympian feat of seaborne drinking, conked out early. Kid Rock, born Robert Ritchie, had performed at rallies for Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, and his anthem for individual liberty, "Born Free," became the campaign's theme song. Perhaps the 41-year-old hoped to sleep through any bad news on the most nerve-wracking night in American politics.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | By Robert Abele
Set in an East Texas work prison in 1976, the turgid indie "Cellmates" pairs an incarcerated Klan bigwig (Tom Sizemore) with a happy-go-lucky Mexican fieldworker (Hector Jimenez). The bigot endures the lectures of a potato-farming-obsessed warden (Stacy Keach, full throttle) and falls for a pretty Latina maid (Olga Segura). Really, you can't blame Sizemore for turning the simplest physical movement or line of dialogue into a hoedown of over-gesturing. Co-writer/director Jesse Baget's incessantly talky mix of faux-Coens-style redneck grandiloquence and un-Coens-like visual flatness leaves the fidgety star trapped in garish close-up for most of the film.
SPORTS
April 9, 2011 | By Mark Heisler
Parting is such sweet sorrow, even in cow towns. Talk about eras ending. Wednesday's Lakers game in Sacramento may be the NBA's last there … and Phil Jackson's last in a regular season anywhere. Unfortunately, Jackson won't get to say goodbye to the fans he called semi-civilized redneck barbarians, prompting them to go home and get their cowbells. Jackson has since called a move to Anaheim "ridiculous" and said he'll miss the rowdy atmosphere, so even if owners Joe and Gavin Maloof offered him their coaching job in 2005, they're skipping a farewell ceremony.
OPINION
June 28, 2010 | Gregory Rodriguez
Irascible rednecks are nothing new in politics. Once upon a time, they tended to be either marginal firebrands like George Wallace or, more recently, the ne'er-do-well, embarrassing siblings of well-educated Southern pols — think Billy Carter or even Roger Clinton. But nowadays they seem to be the mainstream politicians themselves. In April, Haley Barbour, governor of Mississippi, former national GOP chairman and potential 2012 presidential candidate, referred to himself as "a fat redneck" on CNN's "John King USA."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2009 | Associated Press
"Redneck Woman" Gretchen Wilson and her longtime record label, Sony Music Nashville, have parted. Sony announced the split Tuesday, describing it as a mutual decision. Wilson shot to fame with her 2004 smash "Redneck Woman." Her debut album, "Here for the Party," sold 5 million copies. Her next two albums for Sony -- 2005's "All Jacked Up" and 2007's "One of the Boys" -- reached No. 1 but didn't sell nearly as well as her debut and produced only one Top 10 single between them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1989
Almost every city in the Deep South has a main thoroughfare named for the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. People down there say his name with respect and reverence. Having come to Southern California from Oxford, Miss., I was dismayed to find that San Diego is sometimes a more redneck town than the one I left, especially on this issue. Here in San Diego, we stripped King's name from the street signs downtown. We waffled like crazy over affixing his name to the new Convention Center.
NEWS
July 1, 1996 | PAMM HIGGINS
Jeff Foxworthy's a comedian. He has a prime-time sitcom. So, like Jerry, Paul, Tim and Ellen before him, Foxworthy got on the publishing laugh track. And if it weren't for that little pipsqueak Dennis Rodman (arguably a funny guy), "No Shirt, No Shoes. . . . No Problem!" (Hyperion) would probably be No. 1 on the bestseller list. After all, Foxworthy's redneck humor is only one small part of the total man.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2008 | Jon Caramanica, Special to The Times
On last month's debut episode of CMT's celeb-reality competition "Gone Country," (8 p.m. Fridays), mentor John Rich of the country duo Big & Rich sat his pupils around a dinner table to prepare them for the challenges to come. His charges are stars who have seen better days (Bobby Brown, Dee Snider of Twisted Sister) or who have yet to break through (Diana DeGarmo of "American Idol," Julio Iglesias Jr.) -- all of them are on a quest to become country singers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2007 | SCOTT COLLINS, The Channel Island column runs every Monday in Calendar. Contact Scott Collins at channelisland@latimes.com.
HERE'S how quickly a career can change in television: Until a month ago, comic Jeff Foxworthy thought he was pretty much done with the networks. Last week, though, the man who launched a million redneck jokes helped deliver some record-breaking ratings for Fox. New entry on the Foxworthy resume? Only prime-time game-show host in America with his own line of beef jerky products.
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