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Redneck Riviera

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2008 | Elina Shatkin
"Hello. My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die." Two decades later, Mandy Patinkin still relishes what is probably the most iconic role of his acting career, the swashbuckler in "The Princess Bride." Classically trained as an actor, Patinkin, 55, has also spent over 20 years as an accomplished singer. He brings his smorgasbord of Broadway classics and Yiddish folk tunes to the Kodak Theatre Saturday at 8 p.m. HOW DID YOU GET INTO YIDDISH MUSIC? Joe Papp [the late founder of New York's Public Theater]
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2008 | Elina Shatkin
"Hello. My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die." Two decades later, Mandy Patinkin still relishes what is probably the most iconic role of his acting career, the swashbuckler in "The Princess Bride." Classically trained as an actor, Patinkin, 55, has also spent over 20 years as an accomplished singer. He brings his smorgasbord of Broadway classics and Yiddish folk tunes to the Kodak Theatre Saturday at 8 p.m. HOW DID YOU GET INTO YIDDISH MUSIC? Joe Papp [the late founder of New York's Public Theater]
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NATIONAL
July 12, 2012 | By David Horsey
I was at a party recently where a young father was getting a lot of attention as he spooned baby food into the mouth of his 6-month-old son. Several men were gathered around, enjoying the antics of the baby boy, who giggled with every bite. Only a few feet away a young mother was breastfeeding her infant. Both parents were doing the same thing - feeding their children - but the woman was getting the job done in a more intimate way. No one appeared to be shocked or disturbed, but neither was there a cluster of people gathering around her as they were with the man and his kid. Everyone was allowing the mother a realm of privacy in a busy room.
SPORTS
November 15, 2000 | MAL FLORENCE
Nick Canepa of the San Diego Union-Tribune, writing on the Chargers, whose record fell to 0-10 Sunday after a loss to the Miami Dolphins: "The only Floridians we know for certain punched all the right buttons in the last week were the Miami Dolphins. "Of course, the Dolphins were playing the Chargers, therefore running unopposed."
BOOKS
July 19, 1992 | Fred Schruers, Schruers is a writer who's been living temporarily in New Orleans for the last couple of years.
The inhabitants of Daniel Woodrell's fiction often have a streak that's not just mean but savage; yet physical violence does not dominate his books. What does dominate is a seasoned fatalism. In "The Ones You Do," someone is robbed of the $47,000 he needs to pay off bad bets, and killings will ensue, but death tends to be faced with ironic quipping. "I'm gonna guess pain is in the forecast for me, huh, Lunch?" says protagonist John X. Shade when his pursuer shows up.
BOOKS
August 24, 2003 | Mark Rozzo
Calpurnia Anne Scott Alfred A. Knopf: 296 pp., $24 Ah, the Main Line. The storied redoubt of Philadelphia's fashion-resistant Old Money, the glorified suburb that prides itself on not being New York or Hollywood, where good hedges always make the best (preferably WASP) neighbors. It's here, amid the boxwoods and wisteria, that Maribel Archibald Davies, aged bohemian blueblood and aloof matriarch, has passed away under semi-mysterious circumstances in the family's belle epoque mansion, Calpurnia.
NEWS
July 12, 1998 | MARGO KAUFMAN, Special to The Times
Anyone wondering--as I was--what Patricia Cornwell does to deserve a million-copy first printing should pick up "Point of Origin," her most engrossing effort in years (G.P. Putnam's Sons, 368 pages, $25.95). Cornwell's heroine, Dr. Kay Scarpetta, chief medical examiner of Virginia in addition to being a lawyer, government consultant and gourmet cook, has a tendency to be insufferably grandiose, but in this outing she is almost sympathetic.
SPORTS
April 4, 2006 | Tim Brown
A few hours before Casey Kotchman's first at-bat Monday afternoon, his father, Tom, was driving in the Florida Panhandle. "The Redneck Riviera," Tom shouted wryly over a ballgame on the radio and the roar of the passing trucks. Besides managing the Angels' short-season rookie team in Orem, Utah, from June to September, the elder Kotchman works Florida as an area scout. And that's a lot of blue highways.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Like a giant wave, the presidential election returns will be rolling in east to west on Tuesday night, starting at 7 p.m. local time when the polls close in Virginia, as well as five other states. It will be hours - maybe even days - before the winners are known. But experts will immediately start poring over the results make educated guesses, based on preliminary returns and past voting patterns. If, for instance, a candidate runs better - or considerably worse - than expected in certain parts of a state, that could give an early sign of which way a state is headed.
NEWS
June 12, 2003 | Samantha Bonar, Times Staff Writer
My mother lives in north Florida, in an area she calls the Redneck Riviera, and she is fond of saying such things as "I never want to live anywhere where I can't wear sequined flip-flops!" and "I just injected 400 bucks into my forehead!" (post-Botox). My sister and I experience a lot of mixed feelings about our mother, a fourth-generation sunny blond California girl.
NEWS
March 27, 1998
A weekly roundup of unusual news stories from around the globe, compiled from Times wire services: Necking With a Giraffe: A Georgia woman is suing a Florida zoo because a giraffe licked her in 1994. Jennifer Jordan, 28, claims she left Zoo World in Panama City Beach, Fla., with neck, back and shoulder injuries because a giraffe got a little too friendly. Smooch-a-thon: Two couples broke the 24-hour mark Thursday trying to set a record for the world's longest kiss.
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