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Redondo Beach Ca Development And Redevelopment

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1989 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Whites, Tom and Josie, had been searching for years when they finally found the spot to build their dream house. A corner lot, it was, with a whispering sea breeze and an old cottage; where their Mediterranean estate would someday rise. Then they moved in, and the sea breeze whispered, and what it whispered was . . . Cock-a-doodle-doo. And that was how the Whites learned that their dream house would be next door to the Chicken Lady of Redondo Beach.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite their community's reputation as a classic Southern California beach town, Redondo Beach residents and city officials have long lamented their lack of a thriving downtown by their pier and harbor. Redondo's King Harbor area, at the city's northern border, has never achieved the success of similar beachfront commercial districts in nearby Hermosa and Manhattan beaches.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1997 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For decades, the rumors floated that the modest bungalow surrounded by a forest of tall trees in Redondo Beach had been the weekend hideaway of Stan Laurel--the skinny half of Laurel and Hardy. Real estate agents whispered to prospective clients viewing homes that this was where Laurel came to get away from it all. Neighbors boasted that the entertainer had rested his head inside the 1935 Colonial Revival bungalow on Curtis Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1998
The City Council has approved a project of apartments and retail shops in the upscale Riviera Village section in an attempt to re-create the downtown area that the city bulldozed decades ago. Under the plan, a developer will build a $3-million, 12-unit apartment building on Avenue I that will include space for several retailers and underground parking. Construction on the 43,000-square-foot project is scheduled to begin in six months with a target completion date of summer 1999, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1998
The City Council has approved a project of apartments and retail shops in the upscale Riviera Village section in an attempt to re-create the downtown area that the city bulldozed decades ago. Under the plan, a developer will build a $3-million, 12-unit apartment building on Avenue I that will include space for several retailers and underground parking. Construction on the 43,000-square-foot project is scheduled to begin in six months with a target completion date of summer 1999, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1997
In an attempt to rid Redondo Beach of billboards, the City Council has passed a law requiring developers to remove existing billboards before constructing new buildings and allowing the Planning Commission to refuse new projects on properties with billboards until the developer agrees to take them down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1991
The Redondo Beach City Council has approved a pier reconstruction plan that would replace the city's storm-damaged pier with a V-shaped structure that resembles a turn-of-the-century sailing ship. The nautical design plan, which still faces state and federal review, was adopted earlier this week after years of wrangling over whether and how to rebuild the ill-fated horseshoe pier ravaged by storms and fire in 1988. The new $7.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1997
The Redondo Beach pier parking structure will get a face-lift that includes a seismic upgrade, improved traffic circulation and a better bike path. The City Council has allotted $2 million to fix the 25-year-old structure, which has been in disrepair. Barry Keilsmeier, Redondo Beach Harbor properties director, said the renovation will help the structure better withstand an earthquake and improve pedestrian and bicycle access. The city plans to pay for the renovation with redevelopment funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1993 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mixed-use developments, which have sprouted up in West Los Angeles and are beginning to appear in the South Bay, may soon make their entrance in Redondo Beach under a project being considered by the Planning Commission tonight. The development combines 203 condominiums--including 40 affordable units for senior citizens--with a health club, restaurants and retail shops. Opponents fear the project would bring too many residential units to an area they consider overbuilt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1989
A federal appeals court on Wednesday overturned the mail fraud conviction of a former Redondo Beach councilman accused of profiting from his role in getting a development proposal approved. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco threw out six mail fraud convictions against Walter L. Mitchell Jr., 41, who was found guilty in 1983 of improperly pushing for City Council approval to convert Redondo Beach's largest apartment complex, Brookside Village, into condominiums.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1997
In an attempt to rid Redondo Beach of billboards, the City Council has passed a law requiring developers to remove existing billboards before constructing new buildings and allowing the Planning Commission to refuse new projects on properties with billboards until the developer agrees to take them down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1997
The Redondo Beach pier parking structure will get a face-lift that includes a seismic upgrade, improved traffic circulation and a better bike path. The City Council has allotted $2 million to fix the 25-year-old structure, which has been in disrepair. Barry Keilsmeier, Redondo Beach Harbor properties director, said the renovation will help the structure better withstand an earthquake and improve pedestrian and bicycle access. The city plans to pay for the renovation with redevelopment funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1997 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For decades, the rumors floated that the modest bungalow surrounded by a forest of tall trees in Redondo Beach had been the weekend hideaway of Stan Laurel--the skinny half of Laurel and Hardy. Real estate agents whispered to prospective clients viewing homes that this was where Laurel came to get away from it all. Neighbors boasted that the entertainer had slept at the 1935 Colonial Revival bungalow on Curtis Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1997 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For decades, the rumors floated that the modest bungalow surrounded by a forest of tall trees in Redondo Beach had been the weekend hideaway of Stan Laurel--the skinny half of Laurel and Hardy. Real estate agents whispered to prospective clients viewing homes that this was where Laurel came to get away from it all. Neighbors boasted that the entertainer had rested his head inside the 1935 Colonial Revival bungalow on Curtis Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1993 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mixed-use developments, which have sprouted up in West Los Angeles and are beginning to appear in the South Bay, may soon make their entrance in Redondo Beach under a project being considered by the Planning Commission tonight. The development combines 203 condominiums--including 40 affordable units for senior citizens--with a health club, restaurants and retail shops. Opponents fear the project would bring too many residential units to an area they consider overbuilt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1993 | KATHRYN MARTIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Southern California has never been known as a leader in preserving its architectural heritage, but in Redondo Beach there is a fledgling movement to save what is left. Through an aggressive recruiting effort by the 4-year-old Redondo Beach Historic Preservation Commission, and the use of an obscure 1976 state law, the city has begun to develop a new resource: historic homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1997 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For decades, the rumors floated that the modest bungalow surrounded by a forest of tall trees in Redondo Beach had been the weekend hideaway of Stan Laurel--the skinny half of Laurel and Hardy. Real estate agents whispered to prospective clients viewing homes that this was where Laurel came to get away from it all. Neighbors boasted that the entertainer had slept at the 1935 Colonial Revival bungalow on Curtis Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1990 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly two years after two storms and a fire reduced the Redondo Beach pier to a battered stump, a judge ruled Wednesday that the city must rebuild the once-venerable landmark. Torrance Superior Court Judge Abraham Gorenfeld, to the delight of the shell-jewelry vendors and seaside restaurateurs whose businesses once lined the pier, held that reconstruction--which could cost up to $4.6 million--is required by the pier lease. "I'm elated!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1991
The Redondo Beach City Council has approved a pier reconstruction plan that would replace the city's storm-damaged pier with a V-shaped structure that resembles a turn-of-the-century sailing ship. The nautical design plan, which still faces state and federal review, was adopted earlier this week after years of wrangling over whether and how to rebuild the ill-fated horseshoe pier ravaged by storms and fire in 1988. The new $7.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1990 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not much is left of the bustling promenade that once was the Redondo Beach Pier. Where once stood a massive horseshoe swept by brisk sea air, there now stands a pair of salty stumps. What to do about what was left of the pier? It's a question the city has grappled with since 1988, when a string of disasters nearly leveled the once venerable landmark and snuffed out many of the businesses there. Should the pier be rebuilt? If so, how? And at whose expense?
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