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BUSINESS
May 23, 1989
Incomnet Inc. in Westlake Village said the number of outstanding shares of stock in the company will be reduced by half through a one-for-two "reverse split." The number of shares will fall from 15.2 million to 7.6 million. Such an action does not reduce the value of a stockholders' holdings because the shares will trade at twice their price when the split is effective on June 1.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
April 25, 2014 | Mary MacVean
Workouts don't always have to be sweaty, and my mind and spirit needed some attention after a recent long week. We can all meditate or downward our dogs at home, but sometimes it helps to have a little guidance. Reset: 8254 Melrose Ave., www.ToResetClickHere.com Aura: Seems like miles from the hullabaloo just outside; dimmed lights, electric candles and cushiony mats. Effort: Laid-back, for sure. But there's no payoff if you just drop off and don't try to follow the teacher.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2001
"3 Strikes Targets Less-Violent, Older Offenders, Study Finds" (Aug. 23) defies both the facts and common sense. The Washington-based Sentencing Project, which released the study, has opposed sentencing criminals to prison for any length of time since it was formed in 1986. It opposed the adoption of California's three-strikes law seven years ago, claiming the change would cause major increases in our prison population and incarceration costs and would not reduce crime. Now, while conceding that a huge increase in inmates and costs did not occur, the study tries to make the case that while California has led the nation in reducing crime since the adoption of the three-strikes law, the reduction was caused by other factors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Eryn Brown
Calling hospital errors "heartbreaking," U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) on Friday released a report detailing how some California hospitals are reducing medical mistakes that can cause infections, incorrect administration of drugs, falls and other complications. Many medical centers are preventing errors, she said, but others still need to demonstrate they are serious about addressing the problem. According to some researchers, Boxer said, between 210,000 and 440,000 Americans die as a result of medical errors each year -- making medical errors the third leading cause of death in the nation, behind heart disease and cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1996
To reduce gas prices, reduce the speed limit back to 55 mph! ADOLFO TORRES Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2000
On June 8 I read that the U.S. Department of Education has instructed the Compton Unified School District to reduce racial discrimination on its campuses. Reduce? Reduce? How about eliminate? CORRINE L. SUTILA Los Angeles
HEALTH
May 21, 2007
Re: May 14's article on boxing, "Risking It in the Ring": So what else is new? Anyone who participates in boxing should have his or her head examined (pun intended). An important objective in life is to reduce risk. (At least that is what I tell young people.) Boxing, obviously, does not reduce risk. ED GAULD Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1993
What?! An additional energy tax?! The proposed broad-based energy tax, which supposedly will reduce the federal deficit and conserve energy, will have a wide range of ramifications. It will not significantly reduce energy consumption. Instead, everything will cost more. We consumers already pay enough taxes on such things as utilities and gas. This type of regressive tax will only place a heavier burden on the poor and the elderly, because they will spend a greater share of their income on basic necessities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2001
Re "Smog Rules May Be Eased," July 27: I thought the objective is to reduce smog, not to rearrange it. If successful smog reduction can be traded to other smog producers, where is the environmental gain? Wouldn't it be more effective ecologically to reward companies that reduce their smog production with tax and financial incentives, rather than to let them sell their smog credits to others who can continue to pollute? Frances Spielberg Pacific Palisades
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1988
Glidden's idea of invoking stricter penalties on criminals who are under the influence of drugs (of any kind, including alcohol) is right on the mark. Creative ideas such as this, and education, will eventually reduce the demand for drugs. In the meantime, we should legalize the use of drugs so that the supply will increase and prices will come down. Though this will not solve our drug usage problem, it will substantially reduce the crime problem. ALAN B. UNGAR Thousand Oaks
NATIONAL
April 25, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
As temperatures plunged to 16 below zero in Chicago in early January and set record lows across the eastern U.S., electrical system managers implored the public to turn off stoves, dryers and even lights or risk blackouts. A fifth of all power-generating capacity in a grid serving 60 million people went suddenly offline, as coal piles froze, sensitive electrical equipment went haywire and utility operators had trouble finding enough natural gas to keep power plants running. The wholesale price of electricity skyrocketed to nearly $2 per kilowatt hour, more than 40 times the normal rate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Stirred up by a series of Capitol scandals, four candidates for California secretary of state clashed at a forum Wednesday over who is best suited to restore voter faith in state government. Candidates Alex Padilla, Dan Schnur, Pete Peterson and Derek Cressman also challenged one another's ideas for reducing the corrupting influence of big money in state government. The event sponsor, the Sacramento Press Club, did not invite the three other candidates for the job . State Sen. Alex Padilla (D-Pacoima)
BUSINESS
April 21, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien, This post has been corrected. See below for details.
[ This post was updated at 10:24 ] Under Chief Executive Tim Cook, Apple has become increasingly vocal about its efforts to reduce the company's effect on the environment. On Monday, the company launched a revamped website that highlights its progress and discloses some new efforts as well.  The new site, which includes a solemn video narrated by Cook, coincides with Earth Day (which has already started in some parts of the world) and announces Apple's lofty goal: "We want to leave the world better than we found it. " "Better," says Cook in the video.
SPORTS
April 14, 2014 | Helene Elliott
Were those tears or drops of sweat rolling down Teemu Selanne's face Sunday as he skated around the Honda Center, absorbing and returning the crowd's love after the final regular-season game of his Hall of Fame career? If he wept, he wasn't alone. Selanne's love for Southern California was mutual from the day he joined the Ducks in February 1996, traded here by the financially strapped Winnipeg Jets. One sunny breakfast under palm trees, and he was home. "This is my kind of place," he recalled thinking.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Lower-than-expected health insurance premiums under Obamacare will help cut the long-term cost of the program 7% over the next decade, according to the latest report from the Congressional Budget Office. The government's reduction of $104 billion in subsidies for those premiums was the main factor that led the nonpartisan fiscal watchdog to cut its projection of the nation's federal deficit by nearly $300 billion through 2024. According to the CBO report, released Monday, the average annual premium for the new healthcare exchanges' mid-level Silver plan - used as a benchmark - is expected to be $4,400 by 2016.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - The state Senate on Thursday approved a bill that would reduce the maximum possible misdemeanor sentence from one year to 364 days,  to reduce deportations of legal residents for minor crimes. The bill addresses concern that federal law allows legal immigrants to be deported if they are convicted of a crime and given a one-year sentence. Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) said his bill would prevent families from being torn apart if one member commits a crime that is not a felony, such as writing a bad check.
OPINION
June 11, 2007
Re "Absolutists turn against other foes of abortion," June 6 It is a misconception that abortions would be reduced or eliminated if they were banned. If people truly feel that abortion is tragic, then they should be working to promote accurate sex education and access to contraception. Because many more women who live in poverty obtain abortions, working to reduce poverty might also reduce the number of abortions. Banning abortion would only result in a lot of dead women. MAUREEN DEARDEN Torrance
REAL ESTATE
November 11, 2001
Robert Bruss has advised many times that paying off a mortgage in advance of the payment schedule saves them the interest at the rate stated on the mortgage itself. It is incomplete advice. The big advantage in paying in advance is the subsequent benefits. Every time you pay an amount over the regular payment, you reduce the principal on which the next interest amount is computed. The next payment is reduced by that amount and more is applied to reduce the principal. This is repeated on the next and all subsequent payments.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
Tesla Motors Inc. has announced plans to reinforce the undercarriage of about 16,000 cars with high-strength shields to reduce the risk of damage from a crash starting a fire. Elon Musk, the electric car company's chief executive, outlined the retrofit Friday morning, at the same time the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announced it has signed off on the changes and was closing a probe into two fires that occurred in Tesla Model S sports sedans. The NHTSA said it has not identified a safety defect trend that would justify asking Tesla to issue a recall for the Model S. It said "consumers should have their vehicles serviced promptly once they receive notification from Tesla Motors.
AUTOS
March 28, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Tesla Motors Inc. has announced plans to reinforce the undercarriage of about 16,000 cars with high-strength shields to reduce the risk of damage from a crash starting a fire. Elon Musk, the electric car company's chief executive, outlined the retrofit Friday morning, at the same time the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announced that it has signed off on the changes and was closing a probe into two fires that occurred in Tesla Model S sports sedans. The NHTSA did not ask Tesla to issue a recall for the Model S. “NHTSA has not identified a safety defect trend at this time that would justify the agency issuing a recall request letter,” the agency said.
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