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Redwood National Park

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2006 | Julie Cart, Times Staff Writer
Of all the storms to roil this wild North Coast, few have lasted as long as the human uproar over the presence of Redwood National Park, created in 1968 to preserve the world's last and largest stand of towering coastal redwood trees. The 131,000-acre park has never been popular with many rural residents of Humboldt and Del Norte counties, who believe the federal buyout of timber company land put them out of work and crippled struggling communities.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2006 | Julie Cart, Times Staff Writer
Of all the storms to roil this wild North Coast, few have lasted as long as the human uproar over the presence of Redwood National Park, created in 1968 to preserve the world's last and largest stand of towering coastal redwood trees. The 131,000-acre park has never been popular with many rural residents of Humboldt and Del Norte counties, who believe the federal buyout of timber company land put them out of work and crippled struggling communities.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1988
Twenty years ago, Lady Bird Johnson traveled to California's majestic North Coast to dedicate the 58,000-acre Redwood National Park, the most costly and possibly the most controversial U.S. national park ever created. It was a triumphant victory for conservationists at the threshold of the new environmental age.
OPINION
September 8, 2005 | David Rains Wallace, DAVID RAINS WALLACE is the author of "Beasts of Eden" (University of California Press, 2004).
THE SAN FRANCISCO Bay Area has what is perhaps the world's most diverse and extensive urban greenbelt, a complex of national, state and local parks that runs almost continuously from Point Reyes in the north to Big Basin in the south. Millions of people benefit from it, and thousands worked to build it, from national legislators to local citizens. But nobody did more for it than the late professional conservationist, David Brower.
TRAVEL
September 21, 1997 | JOHN McKINNEY
Something in the collective national character is drawn to the highest, deepest, widest . . . and our national parks collect and reflect what is extraordinary in the American landscape. Not surprisingly, it was the discovery of "the world's tallest tree" by a 1963 National Geographic expedition that provided an impetus for Redwood National Park. The popular Lady Bird Johnson Loop Trail and the seldom-used Lost Creek Trail offer fine introductions to the national park.
NEWS
March 14, 1988 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
They're celebrating the 20th anniversary of this enclave of coastal redwood trees this year with the continuation of an ambitious reclamation program and the revival of a long-standing dispute over how to most efficiently administer the park. Redwood National Park, which lies along the coast 330 miles north of San Francisco, encompasses 106,000 acres; 70% of the park is federally owned and managed.
BOOKS
April 16, 1995 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
LET THE MOUNTAINS TALK, LET THE RIVERS RUN: Restoring the Earth for a Green 21st Century by David Brower with Steve Chapple. (Harper Collins: $20; 196 pp.) This rambling memoir and appeal from one of the great environmentalists of our time was written specifically for Earth Day 1995, its twenty-fifth anniversary.
TRAVEL
March 11, 2001 | ELI ELLISON, Eli Ellison is a freelance writer based in Seal Beach
The invitation from my girlfriend's parents was tempting: Stay with them in a Maui time-share for a week, at no cost to Joni and me. But then the date of the trip came to light-the peak of spring break-and I envisioned crowded flights, long waits for dinner tables in Lahaina and roads as congested as, well, pick your favorite L.A. freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2003 | Julie Cart, Times Staff Writer
A Northern California congressman has proposed legislation to redraw the boundary of Redwood National Park to allow state officials to get help from the federal government in transforming property once owned by a timber company into a facility for research and education. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Mike Thompson (D-St. Helena) and introduced Nov.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1990 | S.J. DIAMOND
It's hard to tell what some manufacturers are selling these days. Chesebrough-Pond's Timotei Shampoo runs ads of beautiful scenes, offering to plant "up to 50,000 trees or flowers" in California's parks or help restore Yosemite's meadows. Minute Maid pictures a green glade and a sapling, which they want to plant "in your name" in Redwood National Park. "The decade of the environment is upon us," observes Elliot Gruber, director of development for the National Parks and Conservation Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2003 | Julie Cart, Times Staff Writer
A Northern California congressman has proposed legislation to redraw the boundary of Redwood National Park to allow state officials to get help from the federal government in transforming property once owned by a timber company into a facility for research and education. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Mike Thompson (D-St. Helena) and introduced Nov.
TRAVEL
March 11, 2001 | ELI ELLISON, Eli Ellison is a freelance writer based in Seal Beach
The invitation from my girlfriend's parents was tempting: Stay with them in a Maui time-share for a week, at no cost to Joni and me. But then the date of the trip came to light-the peak of spring break-and I envisioned crowded flights, long waits for dinner tables in Lahaina and roads as congested as, well, pick your favorite L.A. freeway.
TRAVEL
September 21, 1997 | JOHN McKINNEY
Something in the collective national character is drawn to the highest, deepest, widest . . . and our national parks collect and reflect what is extraordinary in the American landscape. Not surprisingly, it was the discovery of "the world's tallest tree" by a 1963 National Geographic expedition that provided an impetus for Redwood National Park. The popular Lady Bird Johnson Loop Trail and the seldom-used Lost Creek Trail offer fine introductions to the national park.
BOOKS
April 16, 1995 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
LET THE MOUNTAINS TALK, LET THE RIVERS RUN: Restoring the Earth for a Green 21st Century by David Brower with Steve Chapple. (Harper Collins: $20; 196 pp.) This rambling memoir and appeal from one of the great environmentalists of our time was written specifically for Earth Day 1995, its twenty-fifth anniversary.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1990 | S.J. DIAMOND
It's hard to tell what some manufacturers are selling these days. Chesebrough-Pond's Timotei Shampoo runs ads of beautiful scenes, offering to plant "up to 50,000 trees or flowers" in California's parks or help restore Yosemite's meadows. Minute Maid pictures a green glade and a sapling, which they want to plant "in your name" in Redwood National Park. "The decade of the environment is upon us," observes Elliot Gruber, director of development for the National Parks and Conservation Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1988
Twenty years ago, Lady Bird Johnson traveled to California's majestic North Coast to dedicate the 58,000-acre Redwood National Park, the most costly and possibly the most controversial U.S. national park ever created. It was a triumphant victory for conservationists at the threshold of the new environmental age.
OPINION
September 8, 2005 | David Rains Wallace, DAVID RAINS WALLACE is the author of "Beasts of Eden" (University of California Press, 2004).
THE SAN FRANCISCO Bay Area has what is perhaps the world's most diverse and extensive urban greenbelt, a complex of national, state and local parks that runs almost continuously from Point Reyes in the north to Big Basin in the south. Millions of people benefit from it, and thousands worked to build it, from national legislators to local citizens. But nobody did more for it than the late professional conservationist, David Brower.
NEWS
March 14, 1988 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
They're celebrating the 20th anniversary of this enclave of coastal redwood trees this year with the continuation of an ambitious reclamation program and the revival of a long-standing dispute over how to most efficiently administer the park. Redwood National Park, which lies along the coast 330 miles north of San Francisco, encompasses 106,000 acres; 70% of the park is federally owned and managed.
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