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Reed E Hundt

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BUSINESS
April 21, 1999 | Elizabeth Douglass
Phone.com Inc. of Redwood City, Calif., has added Reed E. Hundt to its board of directors, becoming another in a string of telecommunications companies to tap the expertise--and influence--of the former chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. Hundt, who was FCC chairman from 1993 to 1997, is a senior advisor at McKinsey & Co. and a principal of Charles Ross Partners, a Maryland consulting and investment firm.
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BUSINESS
May 24, 2001 | Joseph Menn
Intel Corp. co-founder Gordon Moore will step down from the company's board at today's annual meeting, to be replaced by former Federal Communications Commission Chairman Reed Hundt. Moore's retirement, announced last month, ends a 23-year run at the company, including 12 as Intel's chief executive. Moore, 72, is best known for Moore's Law, a 1965 prediction that the number of transistors on a chip would double every year. In 1995, he modified that rule of thumb to every two years.
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BUSINESS
July 6, 1995 | JUBE SHIVER JR.
* Background: The Federal Communications Commission, an independent regulatory agency, was established by Congress 61 years ago. It is responsible for regulating all interstate and foreign communications transmitted by radio, TV, satellite, cable and by wired and wireless telephone. * Management: The agency is run by five commissioners who are appointed by the President to seven-year terms and confirmed by the Senate. The current commissioners are Reed E. Hundt, chairman, (Democrat); Jame H.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1999 | Elizabeth Douglass
Phone.com Inc. of Redwood City, Calif., has added Reed E. Hundt to its board of directors, becoming another in a string of telecommunications companies to tap the expertise--and influence--of the former chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. Hundt, who was FCC chairman from 1993 to 1997, is a senior advisor at McKinsey & Co. and a principal of Charles Ross Partners, a Maryland consulting and investment firm.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2001 | Joseph Menn
Intel Corp. co-founder Gordon Moore will step down from the company's board at today's annual meeting, to be replaced by former Federal Communications Commission Chairman Reed Hundt. Moore's retirement, announced last month, ends a 23-year run at the company, including 12 as Intel's chief executive. Moore, 72, is best known for Moore's Law, a 1965 prediction that the number of transistors on a chip would double every year. In 1995, he modified that rule of thumb to every two years.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1997 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK and HEATHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Reed Hundt, the politically well-connected lawyer who presided over a radical restructuring of the U.S. telecommunications industry, said Tuesday he would resign as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. Hundt said he would stay on as FCC chairman until after his successor is on board, which could take several months. His five-year term on the commission does not end until next year.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1996 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Urging broadcasters to boost their commitment to local political races, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Reed Hundt on Tuesday applauded a move by a Dallas-based chain of TV stations to provide free air time to candidates for governor, U.S. Senate and House of Representatives. The company, A.H. Belo Corp., filed an application with the FCC on Monday to dole out five-minute blocks of air time to candidates to use as they please.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
FCC Chief Backs Broadcasters on Digital TV: Chairman Reed Hundt, the nation's top television regulator, told broadcasters at their convention in Las Vegas that he wants to help them make the historic transition to digital technology. He suggested that broadcasters, not the government, decide what services may be carried on new channels that stations are to receive in the next few years.
NEWS
July 17, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a break with the White House, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Reed Hundt on Wednesday endorsed legislation calling on the television networks to reinstitute their old code of conduct, which included an early-evening family hour free of racy and violent programming. Broadcasters protested that their recent agreement to adopt a new system of rating television programs for sex, violence, foul language and suggestive dialogue should immunize them from such legislation.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1993 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, scored for not quickly choosing a new Federal Communications Commission chairman at a time when the FCC faces a revolution in information technology, plans to name Washington communications lawyer Reed Hunt to head the agency. Sources close to the White House also said Thursday that the Administration is expected to nominate Regina M. Keeney, counsel to the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, to fill the other vacancy on the five-member commission.
NEWS
July 17, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a break with the White House, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Reed Hundt on Wednesday endorsed legislation calling on the television networks to reinstitute their old code of conduct, which included an early-evening family hour free of racy and violent programming. Broadcasters protested that their recent agreement to adopt a new system of rating television programs for sex, violence, foul language and suggestive dialogue should immunize them from such legislation.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1997 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK and HEATHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Reed Hundt, the politically well-connected lawyer who presided over a radical restructuring of the U.S. telecommunications industry, said Tuesday he would resign as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. Hundt said he would stay on as FCC chairman until after his successor is on board, which could take several months. His five-year term on the commission does not end until next year.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1996 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Urging broadcasters to boost their commitment to local political races, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Reed Hundt on Tuesday applauded a move by a Dallas-based chain of TV stations to provide free air time to candidates for governor, U.S. Senate and House of Representatives. The company, A.H. Belo Corp., filed an application with the FCC on Monday to dole out five-minute blocks of air time to candidates to use as they please.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1995 | JUBE SHIVER JR.
* Background: The Federal Communications Commission, an independent regulatory agency, was established by Congress 61 years ago. It is responsible for regulating all interstate and foreign communications transmitted by radio, TV, satellite, cable and by wired and wireless telephone. * Management: The agency is run by five commissioners who are appointed by the President to seven-year terms and confirmed by the Senate. The current commissioners are Reed E. Hundt, chairman, (Democrat); Jame H.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
FCC Chief Backs Broadcasters on Digital TV: Chairman Reed Hundt, the nation's top television regulator, told broadcasters at their convention in Las Vegas that he wants to help them make the historic transition to digital technology. He suggested that broadcasters, not the government, decide what services may be carried on new channels that stations are to receive in the next few years.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1993 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of foot-dragging over President Clinton's choice to head the Federal Communications Commission, the Senate has confirmed Washington antitrust lawyer Reed E. Hundt as the agency's new chairman. Hundt, a 45-year-old Washington lawyer nominated by Clinton on June 1, is scheduled to be sworn in next week in a ceremony presided over by former prep school classmate Vice President Al Gore. However, Clinton is not expected to fill the remaining FCC commissioner vacancy for some time.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1993 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of foot-dragging over President Clinton's choice to head the Federal Communications Commission, the Senate has confirmed Washington antitrust lawyer Reed E. Hundt as the agency's new chairman. Hundt, a 45-year-old Washington lawyer nominated by Clinton on June 1, is scheduled to be sworn in next week in a ceremony presided over by former prep school classmate Vice President Al Gore. However, Clinton is not expected to fill the remaining FCC commissioner vacancy for some time.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1993 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, scored for not quickly choosing a new Federal Communications Commission chairman at a time when the FCC faces a revolution in information technology, plans to name Washington communications lawyer Reed Hunt to head the agency. Sources close to the White House also said Thursday that the Administration is expected to nominate Regina M. Keeney, counsel to the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, to fill the other vacancy on the five-member commission.
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