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SCIENCE
March 8, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Scientists have made a surprising discovery in the waters off the coast of Iraq: a coral reef made up of more than half a dozen species of the marine animals. A team of divers from the Freiberg University of Mining and Technology in Germany and the Marine Science Center at the University of Basrah in Iraq captured video footage of the murky waters where the Shatt al-Arab river flows into the northwestern portion of the Persian Gulf. (You can watch the video above.) The river carries sediment -- and frequently oil -- into that portion of the gulf, which is often churned up by strong winds and currents.
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SCIENCE
March 8, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Scientists have made a surprising discovery in the waters off the coast of Iraq: a coral reef made up of more than half a dozen species of the marine animals. A team of divers from the Freiberg University of Mining and Technology in Germany and the Marine Science Center at the University of Basrah in Iraq captured video footage of the murky waters where the Shatt al-Arab river flows into the northwestern portion of the Persian Gulf. (You can watch the video above.) The river carries sediment -- and frequently oil -- into that portion of the gulf, which is often churned up by strong winds and currents.
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TRAVEL
July 26, 2009
SCIENCE
January 25, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
They are gaudy. They are hungry. And they are invading coral reefs and devouring native fish throughout the Caribbean. They are lionfish, and they are multiplying like crazy. Until recently, the battle to save the Carribean's coral reefs from a lionfish explosion seemed hopeless. Lionfish grow quickly and spawn as much as once every three to four days. They are "gape-limited," which means they feast on whatever fits in their mouth, and there is a painful venom in their spikes. At least in the Atlantic, they appear to have no natural predators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1985
A hole was punched in the bottom of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier Enterprise Saturday evening when it apparently hit an underwater reef south of San Clemente Island, but only outer compartments of the ship were damaged, a Navy spokesman said Sunday. The Alameda-based ship apparently hit a reef 100 miles west of San Diego at 6 p.m. Saturday, damaging voids and tanks at midship on the port side, said Senior Chief Petty Officer Fred Larsen.
NEWS
December 6, 1987 | ERIC BAILEY and KENNETH J. GARCIA, Times Staff Writers
Time was, Dick Helgren could pilot one of his lumbering sportfishing boats onto the sea off Oceanside and, invariably, the flock of eager anglers on board would return home with a decent catch of fish. In recent years, however, it has grown harder and harder to hook 'em, a ready sign of what Helgren and others believe is a decline in sportfishing stocks off the Southern California coast.
WORLD
July 29, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Rescuers searched by sea and air for dozens of Haitians after an overloaded sailboat ran aground and capsized in reef-studded waters off the Turks and Caicos Islands, killing at least 15 migrants fleeing the poverty of their homeland. The boat was carrying an estimated 200 people when it struck a coral reef and broke apart in rough seas near West Caicos. Officials said 15 died and more than 100 were rescued. Dozens were missing.
NEWS
February 18, 1986
Prime Minister David Lange of New Zealand launched an inquiry into the grounding of the Soviet cruise liner Mikhail Lermontov, which struck a visible reef and sank in New Zealand's Cook Strait with the confirmed loss of one Soviet seaman. Passengers who abandoned the liner said they could see waves breaking over the reef minutes before the accident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2000
Re " 'Synectic Falls' a Downer, Lagunans Say," July 23: May I suggest moving the sculpture about a mile due west of its present location. Maybe the fish would appreciate a nice artificial reef. ED KREBS South Laguna
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1992
It would seem to me that the commercial fishermen are overabundant. The number of traps in the waters off our Southern coast has increased from about 500 to an estimated 4,500. The licensing agencies for commercial fishing should regulate the number of permits allowed for a given area along the coast. It is not the sportfishermen who are depleting the resources of our oceans, but the overpopulation of commercial traps. They are depleting their own profits. As a sportfisherman, I can attest to the fact that one or two legal lobsters on any given night is a good catch.
NEWS
December 31, 2013 | By Maeve Reston
KAILUA, Hawaii - President Obama has never been one for the New Year's Eve blowout - and Tuesday appeared to be no exception. The first family spent the last day of 2013 snorkeling with parrotfish and green sea turtles at Hanauma Bay Nature Preserve, slipping into the waters of the famed reef on a day it was blissfully closed to other tourists. The president has shown himself to be a creature of habit during his low-key vacation here on Oahu; the Obamas have snorkeled in the same spot on a number of other winter retreats here.
TRAVEL
October 13, 2013
Thank you for Catharine Hamm's enlightening article on travel insurance ["What That Policy Covers," On the Spot, Oct. 6]. I blew out my knee's quad tendon in Dubai on the first day of a cruise tour. After having my entire leg cast locally, I tried to fly back to L.A. for immediate surgery. I had a prepaid return flight in coach, but Emirates Airlines said it couldn't accommodate me there because my leg had to be elevated and sticking straight out, and coach didn't have the room for my leg. (Of course, I'd have accepted lying across three seats, but the airline said no.)
WORLD
July 22, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Four unarmed bombs jettisoned by U.S. fighter jets in an emergency action last week have settled in relatively shallow water 18 miles from Bell Cay in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, reportedly posing no imminent threat to navigation or the 1,200-mile-long reef that is the world's largest organic construction. But the 2,000 pounds of inert explosive devices at the edge of the World Heritage Site have upset environmentalists and guardians of marine resources who see the accident during U.S.-Australian military exercises as the latest indignity to which the reef has been subjected.
WORLD
May 14, 2013 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
MASINLOC, Philippines - The fishermen were sailing the azure waters off the Philippine coast when Richard Caneda saw the morning sunlight glinting off a vessel "bigger than the biggest ship in the Philippine navy. " Caneda could see a red Chinese flag. The words "Chinese Maritime Surveillance" were written on the ship's side. The ship came close enough that Caneda could see crew members on deck making hand gestures as though to shoo away a fly. Caneda, who had moved from the fishing boat to a tiny skiff to haul in nets left out overnight, soon saw a large gun mounted on the ship's deck pivoting directly toward him. A helicopter whirred overhead.
OPINION
May 6, 2013 | By Chelsea Kahn
In recent years, the Indo-Pacific lionfish - a dramatically striped, finned and armored aquarium fish - has invaded Atlantic and Caribbean coral reefs. It has been spotted off the Southeastern United States, throughout the Caribbean Sea, in the Gulf of Mexico, and it's now eating its way toward South America. What's to blame for this invasion? Most likely aquarium releases beginning in the early 1980s. And once introduced, lionfish took off. The fish has no known predator in the Atlantic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2013 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
The ghosts of Christmas past can be found in some unusual places. The bottom of Lake Havasu, for instance. There, thousands of Christmas trees sunk by wildlife biologists have found a second life as fish habitat in an ecosystem damaged by the damming of the Colorado River decades ago. What nature once provided - a steady source of organic material such as brush and uprooted trees - disappeared when the once wild and muddy river was tamed....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1988 | United Press International
Scientists have discovered that damselfish recognize each other by their voices and that at spawning time the male with the lowest voice is considered the sexiest partner on the reef. The female damselfish chooses a mate by listening to the chirps of the males. There is a direct correlation between the animal's size and the peak frequency of the sounds it makes.
SCIENCE
January 25, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
They are gaudy. They are hungry. And they are invading coral reefs and devouring native fish throughout the Caribbean. They are lionfish, and they are multiplying like crazy. Until recently, the battle to save the Carribean's coral reefs from a lionfish explosion seemed hopeless. Lionfish grow quickly and spawn as much as once every three to four days. They are "gape-limited," which means they feast on whatever fits in their mouth, and there is a painful venom in their spikes. At least in the Atlantic, they appear to have no natural predators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
The federal government on Friday proposed protecting 66 kinds of corals under the Endangered Species Act, an acknowledgment that these reef-building animals are suffering so many insults they are threatened with extinction. The proposal, which covers corals in the Pacific and the Caribbean, lists 19 ways that corals are under assault. They include overfishing, pollution, heat-stroke, disease and dissolving in seawater that is turning more acidic. A team of scientists from the National Marine Fisheries Service spent more than three years reviewing the health of these reef-building corals before proposing their protection.
NATIONAL
November 27, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
HANALEI, Hawaii - When compiling a list of places that may be described as paradise, Hanalei Bay on the rugged north shore of the island of Kauai surely qualifies. The perfect crescent bay, rimmed by palm trees, emerald cliffs and stretches of white sand, has always had a dreamy kind of appeal. It was on these shores that sailors in the movie "South Pacific" sang of the exotic but unattainable "Bali Ha'i. " The problem is what lies below the surface of the area's shimmering blue waters.
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