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Reefs

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1993 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least twice a week, Rodolphe Streichenberger visits his own private ranch. * It is a fertile area, replete with plants and animals. It is also 40 feet underwater. And the most distinctive characteristic of the small plot just outside Balboa Peninsula is the presence of 1,500 used tires half-buried in sand. "This was a real desert," said Streichenberger, 65, a transplanted Frenchman and seasoned scuba diver.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1990 | JOHN PENNER
A sportfishing group on Thursday offered to raise $67,600 needed to create an artificial fishing reef using concrete rubble from the soon-to-be demolished Huntington Beach Municipal Pier. The vow by the Gill Net Watch Committee, a group of 40 Southern California fishing and diving industry representatives, clears the way for a city proposal to create new habitat for fish and other marine life.
NEWS
November 16, 2001 | Reuters
For a $2-million minimum bid on the Internet auction house eBay, one philanthropist can win the right to name an artificial reef planned for the Florida Keys. The nonprofit organization Artificial Reefs of the Keys is auctioning off the right to name the reef, to be created by the sinking next year of a decommissioned military ship 6.5 miles southeast of Key West.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1994
Chevron agreed to create an artificial reef in the Santa Monica Bay to make up for the surfing spots that disappeared after the oil company built a jetty in El Segundo, it was announced today. The joint agreement between Chevron, the Surfrider Foundation and the California Coastal Commission is the first time a major corporation, public agency and citizens group have joined forces to re-create surfing spots, said Surfrider Foundation Executive Director Jake Grubb.
SPORTS
December 15, 1993 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the phone call comes an invitation to go out on a boat at 7 a.m. to watch a bulldozer push 750 tons of concrete rubble off a barge into the ocean. This is a joke, right? No, Jim Paulk insists, this is important. The future of sportfishing in Southern California is at stake. Paulk is president of United Anglers, a conservation organization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1999 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An outlawed artificial reef, made of old tires and PVC pipe, bobs on the ocean floor off the Balboa Pier as its creator tries one last time to persuade state regulators to spare the structure. Aquaculturist Rodolphe Streichenberger was denied a permit two years ago and never asked for one when the experimental reef was built in 1988, but he remains undeterred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California Edison has fallen behind schedule in a massive state-ordered program to build a giant kelp reef and restore wetlands to compensate for years of ocean damage caused by the San Onofre nuclear plant. Less than 15 months after the state set a strict timetable for the long-awaited projects, the wetlands restoration is lagging six months behind deadline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1996 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They thrive unseen and silent off the California coast, these amber-toned kelp forests that teem with a rich bounty of marine life. Among some ocean enthusiasts, giant kelp communities are viewed with the same reverence as ancient redwood forests. So when a kelp bed off San Onofre seemed to be failing mysteriously, alarmed scientists sprang into action. Their conclusion: Kelp was being killed by murky water from a nearby nuclear power plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1990 | CLAY EVANS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two weeks of underwater patching and welding on the capsized Princess Louise in Los Angeles Harbor, salvage workers are nearly ready to refloat the once elegant passenger ship and dockside restaurant. But once raised, the ship that mysteriously sank last October will make only one last, short voyage before it is consigned to Davy Jones' locker.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1995 | HOLLY J. WAGNER
The City Council has approved a nonprofit company's plan to build a 500- to 1,000-foot tire reef off the Balboa Pier as a demonstration project, but the project also must clear state Coastal Commission and Fish and Game Department hurdles before it can proceed. The Marine Forest Society hopes to build an artificial reef to serve as a breeding ground for mussels, fish and other sea creatures.
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