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September 23, 2009 | Alex Rodriguez
The women stood belly to back in a line that curled from underneath a canopy and into the withering sunshine, elbowing and shoving to keep their place. They waited for more than three hours until finally a huddle of men began unloading from a van what the gathering desperately wanted: sugar. Some would pay 40 rupees, about 48 cents, for just over 2 pounds of sugar and walk away beaming. Others would arrive too late and resign themselves to returning the next day. "I come here every day but can't get any sugar," said Perveen Akhtar, 60, shouting above the market din in this northern Punjab city.
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WORLD
April 16, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW - Russia's economy has been hit hard by the turmoil in neighboring Ukraine, Kremlin officials said Wednesday, as pro-Russia separatists battled to take over more territory in Ukraine's east - and potentially add to Moscow's economic burden. Russia's annexation of Ukraine's Crimea region last month and the instability it created in Russian financial markets were cited by government officials for record capital flight and sharply downgraded growth forecasts for the country. Finance Minister Anton Siluanov said that instead of projected 2.5% growth this year, Russia's economy might show no growth at all. Russia's economic slide has accelerated since a rebellion in Ukraine ousted President Viktor Yanukovich, a Kremlin ally, in late February.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2011 | By Nate Jackson, Los Angeles Times
In the den of Darryl Roth's Corona home, cartoon ogres cover the walls, staring back at him with salivating tongues, bloodshot eyes, jagged claws and gnashing teeth. To Roth, the images represent rebellion, a gloriously grotesque imagination — and his father. "I look around and I swear, it's like he's still alive. He's still here," Roth said. He's the youngest son of iconic hot rod artist Ed "Big Daddy" Roth, and this year marked the 10th anniversary of his father's passing. "Even now," said the son, "I'm blown away by him. " Between the late 1950s and the mid-1960s, Ed Roth was what famed journalist Tom Wolfe described as the Salvador Dali of the hot rod world.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- Director-producer John Woo will head up the jury at the fourth annual Beijing International Film Festival , which kicks off April 16, organizers said. Woo, 67, is the Hong Kong helmer of films including "Mission: Impossible II," "A Better Tomorrow," "Red Cliff" and "Face/Off. " The weeklong festival will hold screenings at some 30 theaters throughout China's capital. The international jury will hand out the Tiantan Awards in 10 categories, including best feature, director, actor, actress, cinematography and screenplay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2010 | By Rich Connell, Los Angeles Times
Normally, it would be a major buzz kill to bust out the home movies at a convivial gathering of strangers. But that was the draw Saturday at the Echo Park Film Center ? a serendipitous journey through personal memories and shared history captured in jumpy, grainy, corny and ultimately engrossing home movies spanning much of the last century. "You have no idea what might turn up," said Sean Savage, a film archivist with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Savage and fellow archivist Brian Drischell organized the film portion of Los Angeles' Home Movie Day . The worldwide event takes place one day a year and pays homage to the small treasures hidden away on old 8- and 16-millimeter film reels and aging videotapes stashed in attics or boxes at garage sales.
NEWS
January 13, 1991 | MICHAEL J. SNIFFEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A slice of America's history has become as unreadable as Egyptian hieroglyphics before the discovery of the Rosetta stone. And there's more historic, scientific and business data in danger of dissolving into a meaningless jumble of letters, numbers and computer symbols. Americans paid billions to collect the information and may now have to fork over millions more to preserve it. That's part of the price for the country's eager embrace of more and more powerful computers. Much information from the last 30 years is stranded on computer tape from primitive or discarded systems--unintelligible or soon to be so. As a result, hundreds of thousands of Americans researching family history--the largest use of the National Archives--will find fascinating records of their relatives beyond reach.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1987
As a winner in The Times' recent "Magnificent Movie Poll" held for the grand opening of the Cineplex Odeon theater complex in Universal City, I was excited and all set for a terrific evening. The picture I won was "The Sound of Music" and the thought of seeing it again on the "big screen" was indeed a special occasion. The evening began impressively enough: the magnificent Cineplex complex, free popcorn and Coke, THX sound and guest speakers Robert Wise (producer/director of "Sound of Music")
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2001
In Susan King's "Marilyn Monroe's Last Film Work Resurrected for New Documentary" (May 28), about the unfinished Fox movie "Something's Got to Give," she reports that Kevin Burns "was 'blown away' when he found the 9 1/2 hours of footage during his research." I wonder where Burns was searching? Back in 1989, Fox Entertainment News reporter Henry Schipper, KTTV editor Ken Turner and I also "found" the various reels of raw footage in the Fox vault. We presented the material to then Fox Chairman Barry Diller, who commissioned a documentary on the subject.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1997
I was very pleased to read Kristine McKenna's piece "A Closer Walk With Thee" (March 2). McKenna, thankfully, treats the subject of theology in film with respect and studiousness. It is refreshing and inventive for The Times to reach outside the sheltered sky of studio economics in discussing movies. In empathizing with filmmakers who find their work neither in the lap of the film industry nor in the lap of God, McKenna successfully respects the role of film in a continuum of spiritual discussion, a discussion that will continue long after warehouses of Hollywood reels have turned to dust.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2008 | Marc Weingarten, Special to The Times
Craig Johnson comes as advertised. Standing outside the Autry National Center on a boiling summer afternoon, the Wyoming-based crime novelist is decked out in a long-sleeve shirt made of heavy cotton, scuffed brown boots and a 10-gallon hat that provides shade, but not nearly enough. Spotting his interlocutor, Johnson sticks out his hand and delivers a booming "How ya doin'?!"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Reed Johnson
In his classic tome "The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century," critic Alex Ross compares Minimalism to driving a car "across empty desert, the layered repetitions in the music mirroring the changes that the eye perceives - road signs flashing by, a mountain range shifting on the horizon, a pedal point of asphalt underneath. " Think of the Los Angeles Philharmonic's Minimalist Jukebox festival, then, as a Mojave roadside diner where the menu changes constantly and there's always some unexpected disc spinning hypnotically on the turntable: John Adams' "Naive and Sentimental Music," Steve Reich's "Vermont Counterpoint" or perhaps "Autobahn," the robotic road-trip chamber work by post-human electro-pioneers Kraftwerk.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2014 | Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- The Chinese Film “Black Coal, Thin Ice,” which took home the Golden Bear at the Berlin Film Festival last month, has cleared censorship and will arrive in mainland theaters March 21. But the question now hanging over director Diao Yinan's noirish tale is: Will anyone go see it? At a press conference last week unveiling new posters for the film, Diao was peppered with questions from Chinese reporters, asking him whether the festival win would brand the movie as “too artistic” and scare off prospective viewers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- Smog seems to have helped Smaug at the Chinese box office this last weekend. "The Hobbit: Desolation of Smaug," raked in about $33.7 million from Friday to Sunday, consulting firm Artisan Gateway said Tuesday, putting it in first place. Intense air pollution covering much of northern China may have helped drive patrons to theaters, as the government advised people to limit outdoor activities. "Smaug" far outperformed the opening weekend of director Peter Jackson's first installment in the Warner Bros.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2014 | By Phil Willon, Maura Dolan and Scott Gold
ALTURAS, Calif. - The killing of four people in this tiny Northern California town has left residents reeling and trying to understand the motive. The suspect, Cherie Lash Rhoades, 44, previously had been chairwoman of the small Northern Paiute tribe, but the meeting where the four were shot to death was being held to evict her and her son from the rancheria. The dead included Rhoades' brother and the current tribal chairman, Rurik Davis, 50; her niece Angel Penn, 19; and nephew Glenn Calonicco, 30. Lynn Russo, 47, the tribal administrator, also was killed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2014 | By Scott Gold
It had already been a tough winter in the Central California farm town of Riverdale. The drought had crippled some farms and caused some of the almond trees, long a sign of pride and prosperity, to wither and die. "Everybody's been tightening their belts," said Kathryn Ervin, 60. "Times are hard. " But no one was prepared for what unfolded Saturday night: A horrific accident that sent an SUV carrying a mother and her four children hurtling in flames toward a nearby house. A man pulling up seconds later, sprinting toward the wreckage to help, burning his hands and arms as five people died in the flames - his people.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2014 | By Susan King
"Gravity," "Captain Phillips" and "Frozen" are among the winners of the 61st Motion Picture Sound Editors Golden Reel Awards Sunday evening at the Bonaventure Hotel. The Golden Reels recognize outstanding achievement in sound editing in feature films, long-form and short-form TV, animation, documentaries and other media. "Gravity," which earned six BAFTA Awards earlier in the day in London, won the award for sound editing in a feature film-sound effects and foley. "Captain Phillips" received the Golden Reel for best sound editing in a feature film-dialogue and ADR, while "Frozen" earned the trophy in the sound editing in a feature film-music, musical feature category.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1994
It's no surprise that making movies is big business in Los Angeles--but what about the San Fernando Valley? Of the seven major movie studios in the Los Angeles area, two, Warner Brothers and Universal Sutdios, are located in the Valley. The area is home to hundreds of smaller production companies and scores of actors, execuives andcraftspeople. In addition, there are numerous businesses based in the Valley that supply good and services to the entertainment indstry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1993
Thank you for your enlightening article on Hollywood "genius" Matt Williams ("He's Got the Juice," by Hilary de Vries, May 23). With Roseanne Barr and Tim Allen, Williams took two comedians with already established personas and handed them obligatory sitcom families. For Carol Burnett, his revolutionary concept was to create a pseudo-variety show. How astonishing that with a minimal amount of imagination and creativity, Williams is being paid millions.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2014 | By Times staff writers
The Motion Picture Sound Editors presented the 61st MPSE Golden Reel Awards at the Bonaventure Hotel in Los Angeles. Golden Reel Awards recognizing outstanding achievement in sound editing were presented in 24 categories. The following is a complete list of winners: Career Achievement Award Randy Thom TV/FEATURE ANIMATION & DOCUMENTARY Best Sound & Music Editing: Television Animation "Fairly Odd Parents" - "Dumbbell Curve" (Nickelodeon) Directed by: Randy Myers, Michelle Bryan Produced by: Butch Hartman, George Goodchild Nominees: Supervising Sound Editor: Heather Olsen, MPSE Sound Designer: Heather Olsen, MPSE Supervising Foley Editor: Roy Braverman Supervising Dialogue Editor: Robbi Smith, MPSE Foley Artist: John Lampinen Best Sound & Music Editing: Television Documentary Short Form "North America: No Place To Hide" (Discovery Channel)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
More later on the wild happenings of the Russia-U.S. hockey game, seen on NBC Sports Network during the early-morning of the West Coast. But after all the hype - yes, color commentator Ed Olcyk actually said, "The wow is now," before puck-drop and the pregame intro included the line "Some cold wars don't end" - could the game have ended with a better made-for-TV moment? The first U.S.-Russia Olympic game on Russian soil since the iconic Miracle on Ice 34 years before not only went to overtime but to a shootout, that modern, winner-take-all invention that's practically custom-built for the NBC highlight reel.
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