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July 1, 2013 | By Catherine Watson
When you're you're with Civil War reenactors, it's sometimes hard to remember what era you're in. I was invited to join the Confederate contingent as an observer to see the war play out. It is the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, and we are in the rolling hills of Pennsylvania when I realize there are still moments when I've lost track of time. I forget about ice, water, the summer heat and how badly I need a shower. In the 1860s, those wouldn't have been such pressing concerns.
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NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Catherine Watson
When you're you're with Civil War reenactors, it's sometimes hard to remember what era you're in. I was invited to join the Confederate contingent as an observer to see the war play out. It is the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, and we are in the rolling hills of Pennsylvania when I realize there are still moments when I've lost track of time. I forget about ice, water, the summer heat and how badly I need a shower. In the 1860s, those wouldn't have been such pressing concerns.
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NEWS
July 6, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Exploding cannon fire and screeching rebel yells on a 300-acre farm outside Gettysburg signaled the beginning of the end for what was billed as the largest reenactment ever of a Civil War battle. About 15,000 "soldiers" re-created the bloody charge directed in 1863 by Confederate Gen. George Pickett, the final confrontation in a three-day battle that became a turning point in the war. The reenactment has been performed annually for about 75 years.
NEWS
June 29, 2013 | By Catherine Watson
How do you pack for the Civil War? Heavily, very heavily indeed. I'm about to join a reenactment at the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, and I have to look the part, not of a cavalryman like the rest of my outfit, but of a civilian observer. I'll be depicting what I might have been in 1863 Pennsylvania -- a war correspondent embedded with a unit of Confederate cavalry. Why Confederate? Because the Union didn't ask. Ten years ago, through a friend, this unit invited me to camp with them at the 140th anniversary reenactment.
NEWS
June 29, 2013 | By Catherine Watson
How do you pack for the Civil War? Heavily, very heavily indeed. I'm about to join a reenactment at the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, and I have to look the part, not of a cavalryman like the rest of my outfit, but of a civilian observer. I'll be depicting what I might have been in 1863 Pennsylvania -- a war correspondent embedded with a unit of Confederate cavalry. Why Confederate? Because the Union didn't ask. Ten years ago, through a friend, this unit invited me to camp with them at the 140th anniversary reenactment.
NATIONAL
August 20, 2011 | By Megan Garvey, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
A Civil War prison in Georgia -- briefly the largest prison camp of the conflict -- continues to provide archaeologists with fresh artifacts, including the personal belongings of Union soldiers held there. Camp Lawton, in Millen, Ga., has been the site of an excavation by a team from Georgia Southern University since last year. This week, university officials announced the team had found a ring, a corps badge, keys to furniture and doors, suspender buckles and a pocket knife.
TRAVEL
April 10, 2011
Best way to Missouri's battlefields From LAX , Frontier and Southwest offer nonstop service, and US Airwasy, Frontier, Delta, United, Continental and American offer connecting service (change of plane) to Kansas City, Mo. Restricted round-trip fares begin at $218. From LAX to St. Louis, Southwest and American offer nonstop service, and American, United, Delta, Frontier, US Airways and Continental offer connecting service. Restricted round-trip fares begin at $268. BATTLEFIELD SITES AND MEMORIALS First Battle of Boonville 150th Commemoration, http://www.goboonville.com , June 17-19.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2012 | Richard Simon
For a piece of history that gave us the rockets' red glare and bombs bursting in air, the War of 1812 tends to evoke a collective "Huh?" on the U.S. side of the border with Canada. "The War of 1812 has no compelling narrative that appeals to the average American," said Jerald Podair, a history professor at Lawrence University in Wisconsin. "It's just a hodgepodge of buildings burning, bombs bursting in air and paintings being saved from the invaders, all for a vaguely defined purpose.
NATIONAL
December 26, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
George Washington's Christmas crossing of the Delaware River led to critical battles in Trenton and Princeton. Its annual reenactment is now the subject of a legal fight. But modern skirmishers put aside their differences over some of the portrayals to conduct the 49th reenactment.
NEWS
March 31, 1988 | United Press International
Dozens of people lugged heavy crosses through dusty streets and whipped their backs into a bloody pulp today in a reenactment of the torture Christians believe Jesus suffered before his Crucifixion. The annual rituals, highly criticized by the nation's Roman Catholic leaders, will climax Good Friday as some devotees are nailed to crosses on the day Christians mark the Crucifixion of Jesus.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
If you'd like to see Vice's beautifully-lit photograph of a model portraying Sylvia Plath kneeling before an open oven -- in a dress from Chloe Sevigny -- you're too late. That photo appeared in a fashion spread illustrating the suicides of female authors. The photos, shot by Annabel Mehran, went online Monday; outcry ensued. On Tuesday morning, they'd been removed. Vice has typically prided itself on being a provocative publication. Removing the photo shoot from its website might be seen as a turn for the magazine -- but of course, the photos can still be found in the print edition.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON -- President Obama complained about the looming interest rate hike on student loans in a Rose Garden event Friday morning and urged Americans to call, write and tweet their Republican members of Congress to do something about it. But on Capitol Hill, GOP leaders questioned why Obama doesn't just ask Senate Democrats to take up the Republican rescue plan already passed by the House. The two sides are quibbling over the details of how to avert the rise in interest rates on federally subsidized student loans, set to double to 6.8% in a month.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"The Scottsboro Boys" has finally arrived in Los Angeles, a year after this 2010 Broadway musical performed in San Diego and San Francisco. It shouldn't have taken this long, but don't miss the opportunity to catch one of the most inventive American musicals to come around in a long while. The show, which opened Wednesday at the Ahmanson Theatre, is a sophisticated knockout, a musical for those who like their razzle-dazzle with a radical, unsentimental edge. The subject matter is the opposite of upbeat, but "The Scottsboro Boys" reminds us that remembrance can be a kind of redress, that not letting evil escape into oblivion can be a partial victory.
NATIONAL
March 23, 2013 | By Jill Rosen
Called to action by the blast of a horn, more than 30 yapping, spotted hounds spill down a hill, bound across a country road, leap a fence and rush a faded winter field. On their heels are about two dozen hunters on horseback, men and women in breeches and tweed and velvet hats. The few motorists this deep in the country on a winter weekday morning slow down to watch. Some stop. It's something to behold, this pageant of beasts and man - a scene from another time, another place. A painting.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
In the film based on her memoir "Mulberry Child," Jian Ping speaks of her family's ordeal during the Cultural Revolution with searing detail and not an ounce of sentimentality. The same can't be said of director Susan Morgan Cooper's heavy-handed approach to the material. Moving between a present-day mother-daughter clash of values and a personal history of life under Mao's regime, her docudrama is an awkward mix. Especially distracting are the reenactments, which undercut the power of the film's archival images - among them photographs taken surreptitiously by one of China's Red Guardsmen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2012 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
The tall ships dueling off the coast of Dana Point were only supposed to look like they were at war. But after the cannon aboard the tall ship Amazing Grace rumbled, the stinging pain that Donna Reed felt in her legs was quite real. "It was like a scene from 'The Exorcist,' " said Reed, her wounds still sore days later. "I started to bleed in several different areas. " She had been shot. So it went during what was supposed to be a climactic moment in the Ocean Institute's annual tall ships festival: the Saturday evening mock cannon fight that would simulate the spectacle of a historic battle on the high seas.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2002 | SCOTT SANDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What is "I, Detective," a new series premiering tonight at 9:30 on Court TV? (A) a documentary (B) a murder mystery (C) a quiz show (D) all of the above The correct answer is D, which also stands for "disquieting," "disconcerting" or "disturbing"--take your pick. The basic premise of "I, Detective" is to reconstruct a real-life crime and retrace the steps investigators took to solve the case, with interviews and reenactments providing the bulk of the program.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
The exceptional documentary "Holy Man: The USA vs. Douglas White" tells the haunting tale of White, a Lakota Sioux medicine man from South Dakota's storied Pine Ridge Reservation who, at age 72, was imprisoned for the alleged sexual abuse of his two young grandsons. Years later, his grandsons, who were ensnared as children in a family custody feud, confessed to lying at White's trial. But White, whose case this film asserts symbolizes the racial bias Native Americans frequently face in the U.S. courts, remained incarcerated until 2009, when he died at 89 from lung cancer.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2012 | Richard Simon
For a piece of history that gave us the rockets' red glare and bombs bursting in air, the War of 1812 tends to evoke a collective "Huh?" on the U.S. side of the border with Canada. "The War of 1812 has no compelling narrative that appeals to the average American," said Jerald Podair, a history professor at Lawrence University in Wisconsin. "It's just a hodgepodge of buildings burning, bombs bursting in air and paintings being saved from the invaders, all for a vaguely defined purpose.
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