Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRees Lloyd
IN THE NEWS

Rees Lloyd

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1991 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Robin Hood were alive today, he would wear a leather jacket and jeans and would fleece the rich in court rather than in Sherwood Forest. At least that's the opinion of Rees Lloyd, whose Robin Hood Foundation in Glendale delights in dragging the rich and powerful into court on behalf of poor workers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1991 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Robin Hood were alive today, he would wear a leather jacket and jeans and would fleece the rich in court rather than in Sherwood Forest. At least that's the opinion of Rees Lloyd, whose Robin Hood Foundation in Glendale delights in dragging the rich and powerful into court on behalf of poor workers.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 26, 1987 | VICTOR MERINA, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles County Civil Service Commission tentatively ruled Wednesday that two county office workers were victims of retaliation for supporting a fellow employee who complained she had been harassed for racial and religious reasons. Shirley Hill, a secretary, and Robbie Taylor, a word processor, in the county Department of Health Services had contended that they were unfairly disciplined and demoted for speaking out in a bitter discrimination case involving a Latino co-worker.
NEWS
November 26, 1987 | VICTOR MERINA, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles County Civil Service Commission tentatively ruled Wednesday that two county office workers were victims of retaliation for supporting a fellow employee who complained she had been harassed for racial and religious reasons. Shirley Hill, a secretary, and Robbie Taylor, a word processor, in the county Department of Health Services had contended that they were unfairly disciplined and demoted for speaking out in a bitter discrimination case involving a Latino co-worker.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1989
A former secretary in Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich's office claimed Monday that she was demoted and transfered out of the Republican supervisor's office because she is Latina and a Democrat. In a complaint filed with the county's Civil Service Commission, Gloria A. Salmeron said she was told May 2 by Antonovich's chief deputy, Tom Silver, to clear out her desk immediately and report to work in the executive office because "her work was not getting done." During her 15 years with the county, including the last three with Antonovich's office, Salmeron was always rated competent, said Rees Lloyd, attorney for the Los Angeles County Chicano Employees Assn.
NEWS
March 18, 1993
Two boys who stopped a purse snatcher outside the Glendale Galleria were honored Monday for their heroism at a press conference held by the Robin Hood Foundation, a Glendale legal aid group. Mike Martinez, 15, and his brother David, 11, received a check for $500 from the foundation's general counsel Rees Lloyd, who was present Saturday when the boys tackled the fleeing suspect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1988
The Los Angeles County Civil Service Commission has upheld a religious discrimination ruling against the Department of Health Services in a case brought by a Catholic who charged that she was harassed by Christian fundamentalist co-workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1990
A Los Angeles County hearing officer--reviewing an employee's complaint that he lost a promotion to a "crony" of a Parks and Recreation Department official--has found that the deparment violated Civil Service rules. William de la Garza, a 29-year county employee, contended that Henry Roman, a friend of a department official, was appointed to a regional director's job that de la Garza said had been promised to him.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A state appellate court has upheld a $46,000 award against a former American Civil Liberties Union attorney who tried to eject a Newport Beach police officer from a public debate on police abuse. Three judges of the 4th District Court of Appeal affirmed the 1987 verdict of an Orange County Superior Court jury, which decided in favor of Officer Richard T. Long and against attorney Rees Lloyd. "It's preposterous. First Amendment rights were just trampled on by the court," said Hugh R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1987
Last July, a police officer won $20,000 from the American Civil Liberties Union, which he said had violated his civil rights by ejecting him from a meeting on police spying. Wednesday, the ACLU's bill in the case more than quadrupled when Orange County Superior Court Judge Henry T. Moore Jr. decided that Newport Beach Police Sgt. Richard T. Long deserved $72,033 in legal fees and court costs. Earlier, Moore had denied the ACLU's request for a new trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1987 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
A jury decided Wednesday that the American Civil Liberties Union violated the rights of a police officer, the first time the renowned defender of American freedoms has been found to have trodden on the rights of others. Orange County Superior Court jurors fixed damages at $20,000 in favor of Newport Beach Police Sgt. Richard T. Long, who had sued for violation of his rights after he was ejected from a 1980 ACLU meeting on the subject of police spying.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1988 | VICTOR MERINA, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles County hearing officer has ruled in favor of a deputy marshal who claimed that he was a victim of racial bias against Latinos by being denied a promotion last year to sergeant. Ronald Rocha, a 20-year veteran of the marshal's department, had filed the discrimination claim with the county Civil Service Commission after charging that he and other Latinos were unable to win promotions under Marshal Robert F. Mann.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|