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Reesey Shaw

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November 7, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Reesey Shaw has turned her pale cloth constructions into solid blocks of encaustic-painted wood. Perhaps the most remarkable thing about these chunky abstract wall pieces is that they so clearly continue her sensibility in a material that might seem contrary to it. Where the fabric once curled at the edges, the wood evades right angles. Though her constructions are essentially built of only one or a few simple elements, they become complex in their deviations from stark geometry.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic
Now that the last California gnatcatcher has migrated over the coastal bluffs of Encinitas, the fledgling Lux Art Institute has broken ground for a permanent facility. Construction was delayed to accommodate the birds, but now it's full speed ahead on the first of two buildings that will allow the institute to "reframe the natural world through art," as the mission statement puts it.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1990 | LEAH OLLMAN
Somewhere between Reesey Shaw's understated art and Dave Hickey's overstated catalogue essay lies a middle ground of eloquence, self-confidence and appealing energy. Rarely, however, do Shaw's forms and Hickey's words meet there. "Reesey Shaw: Selected Works 1980-1990," at the Mesa College Art Gallery through April 6, traces the evolution of the artist's style from blithe decoration to austere formalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1990 | LEAH OLLMAN
Somewhere between Reesey Shaw's understated art and Dave Hickey's overstated catalogue essay lies a middle ground of eloquence, self-confidence and appealing energy. Rarely, however, do Shaw's forms and Hickey's words meet there. "Reesey Shaw: Selected Works 1980-1990," at the Mesa College Art Gallery through April 6, traces the evolution of the artist's style from blithe decoration to austere formalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic
Now that the last California gnatcatcher has migrated over the coastal bluffs of Encinitas, the fledgling Lux Art Institute has broken ground for a permanent facility. Construction was delayed to accommodate the birds, but now it's full speed ahead on the first of two buildings that will allow the institute to "reframe the natural world through art," as the mission statement puts it.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1987 | LEAH OLLMAN
- A party with purpose is planned for Dec. 12. Installation, the downtown nonprofit gallery, will receive all proceeds from the evening's $25 ticket price. The party, to feature valet parking, hosted bar, dancing and the raffle of a work of art, will also celebrate the opening of The Annex, a new art gallery set in a rehabilitated 1905 produce warehouse at 6th and Island. The Annex's opening show includes local artists Jay Johnson, Reesey Shaw, Christopher Lee and Gary Ghirardi.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1986 | ROBERT McDONALD
The Mark Quint Gallery (664 9th Ave.) is presenting three shows by three artists representing three very different aesthetics. The most engaging works are the dozen ceramic "casas" making up what Jens Morrison calls a "Zone of Refuge." Through his works, the artist wishes to convey his respect for Mexican peasant architectural forms, which he perceives as springing from natural, rural needs and feelings--as opposed to artificial, urban demands and intellect.
NEWS
May 22, 2003 | Anne Valdespino, Times Staff Writer
On a hillside overlooking the San Elijo Lagoon in San Diego County, a grove of young trees has begun bearing fruit. Long, spindly limbs trail the ground, loaded with bunches of Anna apples, their green skin showing a maroon blush as they slowly ripen, inviting visitors to reach out and pluck a sweet, crisp treat. An apple grove in Encinitas? Yes and no.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1986 | ROBERT McDONALD
The current offerings at the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art are a small, but choice, exhibit of works by British sculptor Tony Cragg; a "pocket exhibit" by Reesey Shaw, and many works from the museum's permanent collection. Cragg, like Bill Woodrow, another British sculptor who had a major exhibit at the museum some months ago, uses the detritus of our urban civilization to construct his works. Cragg, however, does not, like Woodrow, substantially alter the objects he discovers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1995 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Surrealist patriarch Andre Breton visited Mexico in 1938, he declared it the "Surrealist place par excellence," what with its dramatic terrain and rich mixture of races and native and imported religions. It probably didn't hurt that one of Breton's hosts was painter Frida Kahlo, whose mesmerizing self-portraits fusing pain and beauty have become emblematic of Mexican Surrealism.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Reesey Shaw has turned her pale cloth constructions into solid blocks of encaustic-painted wood. Perhaps the most remarkable thing about these chunky abstract wall pieces is that they so clearly continue her sensibility in a material that might seem contrary to it. Where the fabric once curled at the edges, the wood evades right angles. Though her constructions are essentially built of only one or a few simple elements, they become complex in their deviations from stark geometry.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1985 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
For much of 1985, Gustaf Anders restaurant, the posh La Jolla eatery, has been doing its share to help local artists show their wares by surrounding diners with locally created art. Now the restaurant will offer a Christmas gift to diners or bar customers--albeit somewhat belatedly. But a little background first. Gustaf Magnuson, the Gustaf in Gustaf Anders, likes art and wanted to do something for local artists. "I think the art in most restaurants is atrocious," he said.
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