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Reeve Irvine Research Center

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor Christopher Reeve and philanthropist Joan Irvine Smith on Sunday marked the second year of their partnership in fighting spinal cord injuries and honoring pioneers in that field. "I now go to the mailbox every day to see if somebody else wants to fork over another million bucks," Reeve said with a smile during the Oaks International equestrian competition at Smith's sprawling ranch outside San Juan Capistrano.
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SCIENCE
October 12, 2010 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Researchers announced Monday that they had injected stem cells into a patient with a spinal cord injury on Friday, kicking off the world's first clinical trial of a therapy derived from human embryonic stem cells. The patient was treated at Shepherd Center, a spinal cord and brain injury center in Atlanta. Though the trial, run by Geron Corp. of Menlo Park, Calif., is in its earliest stages ? aimed primarily at testing the treatment for safety ? the event stands as a landmark one for embryonic stem cell researchers, who for years have studied the cells' potential to treat spinal cord injuries, diabetes and a variety of neurodegenerative diseases.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2004 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
When Orange County heiress and equestrian Joan Irvine Smith saw Christopher Reeve on TV in 1995, she was impressed not only by the actor but also by the fact that he didn't blame his horse for the injury that paralyzed him earlier that year. Smith wrote to Reeve, offering to donate $1 million to establish a spinal-cord research center at UC Irvine if he would donate his name. Not knowing Smith or UCI, Reeve did what celebrities do with so much of their mail: He threw it into his kook file.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2004 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
When Orange County heiress and equestrian Joan Irvine Smith saw Christopher Reeve on TV in 1995, she was impressed not only by the actor but also by the fact that he didn't blame his horse for the injury that paralyzed him earlier that year. Smith wrote to Reeve, offering to donate $1 million to establish a spinal-cord research center at UC Irvine if he would donate his name. Not knowing Smith or UCI, Reeve did what celebrities do with so much of their mail: He threw it into his kook file.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1997
Christopher Reeve joined Joan Irvine Smith, UCI Chancellor Laurel Wilkening and about 500 other people Friday in dedicating the first of five buildings planned for the university's biomedical research center. The William J. Gillespie Neuroscience Research Facility is home to the Reeve-Irvine Research Center, which is named after the actor. Reeve suffered an equestrian accident that left him paralyzed in 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1996 | From a Times Staff Writer
With the help of actor Christopher Reeve and Orange County philanthropist Joan Irvine Smith, UC Irvine officials have launched a fund-raising campaign to establish what would be one of the few spinal cord research centers in the nation. The Reeve-Irvine Research Center, which could open within two years, would concentrate on developing treatments to repair and regenerate neurological function in spinal cord patients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1996
When actor Christopher Reeve was critically injured last year in a riding competition, he joined the more than 12,000 people who suffer spinal cord injuries each year and the more than 250,000 Americans in total who have disabilities related to spinal cord injuries. Reeve's courage and perseverance are an inspiration to us. Not only has he made phenomenal progress considering the severity of his injury, he has become a beacon of hope for others who suffer similar disabilities. Yesterday Reeve only played Superman.
SCIENCE
October 12, 2010 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Researchers announced Monday that they had injected stem cells into a patient with a spinal cord injury on Friday, kicking off the world's first clinical trial of a therapy derived from human embryonic stem cells. The patient was treated at Shepherd Center, a spinal cord and brain injury center in Atlanta. Though the trial, run by Geron Corp. of Menlo Park, Calif., is in its earliest stages ? aimed primarily at testing the treatment for safety ? the event stands as a landmark one for embryonic stem cell researchers, who for years have studied the cells' potential to treat spinal cord injuries, diabetes and a variety of neurodegenerative diseases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS
UC Irvine will sponsor an equestrian competition Sunday to benefit its spinal cord research center, founded with help from actor Christopher Reeve. A Day at the Oaks International, a world-class equestrian event, will take place in San Juan Capistrano. The Reeve-Irvine center is the result of the combined efforts of "Superman" movie star Reeve, who suffered a spinal cord injury in a horse-jumping accident; philanthropist Joan Irvine Smith; UCI and the American Paralysis Foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1996
A Swiss neuroscientist working to find a cure for spinal-cord injuries was awarded Sunday with the first Christopher Reeve Research Medal, named after the actor who was paralyzed after a 1995 equestrian accident. The award, which includes a $50,000 prize donated by philanthropist Joan Irvine Smith, recognizes the spinal-cord injury research of Martin E. Schwab, 47, the director of the Brain Research Institute at the University of Zurich, Switzerland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS
UC Irvine will sponsor an equestrian competition Sunday to benefit its spinal cord research center, founded with help from actor Christopher Reeve. A Day at the Oaks International, a world-class equestrian event, will take place in San Juan Capistrano. The Reeve-Irvine center is the result of the combined efforts of "Superman" movie star Reeve, who suffered a spinal cord injury in a horse-jumping accident; philanthropist Joan Irvine Smith; UCI and the American Paralysis Foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor Christopher Reeve and philanthropist Joan Irvine Smith on Sunday marked the second year of their partnership in fighting spinal cord injuries and honoring pioneers in that field. "I now go to the mailbox every day to see if somebody else wants to fork over another million bucks," Reeve said with a smile during the Oaks International equestrian competition at Smith's sprawling ranch outside San Juan Capistrano.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1997
Christopher Reeve joined Joan Irvine Smith, UCI Chancellor Laurel Wilkening and about 500 other people Friday in dedicating the first of five buildings planned for the university's biomedical research center. The William J. Gillespie Neuroscience Research Facility is home to the Reeve-Irvine Research Center, which is named after the actor. Reeve suffered an equestrian accident that left him paralyzed in 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1996
When actor Christopher Reeve was critically injured last year in a riding competition, he joined the more than 12,000 people who suffer spinal cord injuries each year and the more than 250,000 Americans in total who have disabilities related to spinal cord injuries. Reeve's courage and perseverance are an inspiration to us. Not only has he made phenomenal progress considering the severity of his injury, he has become a beacon of hope for others who suffer similar disabilities. Yesterday Reeve only played Superman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1996 | From a Times Staff Writer
With the help of actor Christopher Reeve and Orange County philanthropist Joan Irvine Smith, UC Irvine officials have launched a fund-raising campaign to establish what would be one of the few spinal cord research centers in the nation. The Reeve-Irvine Research Center, which could open within two years, would concentrate on developing treatments to repair and regenerate neurological function in spinal cord patients.
NEWS
June 4, 1998
Chef Joachim Splichal was looking for a different way to introduce folks to the cuisine at his soon-to-be restaurant, Pinot Provence in Costa Mesa. He decided on the Capistrano Antiques and Garden Show, in San Juan Capistrano Friday through Sunday. To Splichal, known for his five-star menu, dishing out samples to 5,000 lovers of antiques, jewelry and decorative arts made sense. For one thing, he'll have lots of company. More than 60 vendors will present wares at the show.
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