Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReferendum
IN THE NEWS

Referendum

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
March 16, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
PEREVALNE, Ukraine - Shortly after hundreds of polling stations opened across the breakaway Ukraine's Autonomous Republic of Crimea on Sunday, it became increasingly clear that after 23 years of being part of the Ukraine Crimean peninsula washed by the Black Sea in its south made albeit an illegitimate but quite effective leap toward rejoining Russia, to which Crimea had belonged for over three centuries before. The referendum, declared illegal by the Interim Government in Kiev and by all the Western powers, would have hardly happened at all without the impressive assistance of Russian armed forces which have de facto occupied the breakaway peninsula since the end of February, when the  heavily armed Russian commandos captured the government and parliament buildings in the regional capital of Simferopol and installed the pro-Kremlin government, immediately asking for military and economic assistance from Russia.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 25, 2014 | By David Zucchino
LATTA, S.C. - Police Chief Crystal Moore was born and raised in this tiny farming crossroads and served as a volunteer police dispatcher while she was still in high school. She became the town's first female officer with a sterling 23-year record on the force - until she was ordered into the mayor's office this month and summarily fired. Mayor Earl Bullard handed Moore a list of seven reprimands citing, among other alleged transgressions, questioning authority and failing to maintain order at a council meeting.
Advertisement
WORLD
December 12, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO -- Egypt's leading opposition group urged its followers Wednesday to vote against an Islamist-drafted constitution, ending weeks of indecision over whether anti-government protesters should boycott a referendum set for this weekend. The move by the National Salvation Front will be a pivotal test for an opposition that appears to lack enough widespread support to derail a referendum backed by President Mohamed Morsi and the powerful Muslim Brotherhood. The opposition has revived the country's revolutionary fervor but has been marred by divisions and poor organization.
WORLD
April 8, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Parti Quebecois suffered its worst provincial election defeat in 44 years on Monday, spurring debate throughout Canada on whether the party's signature goal of Quebec independence is dead. Politicians and pundits took to the airwaves Tuesday to proclaim the separatist movement an idea whose time has come and gone. Parti Quebecois won only 25% of the provincial parliament vote, weighed down by a prominent candidate's vow to stage another referendum on separation despite what pollsters say is a two-thirds majority of Quebec voters opposed to the idea.
WORLD
December 14, 2012 | By Reem Abdellatif
CAIRO - Demonstrators clashed in Alexandria on Friday as Egyptians gathered across the nation in rival rallies on the eve of a referendum on a divisive draft constitution backed by Islamist President Mohamed Morsi. Thousands of Islamists waved banners and flags in Cairo and other cities to support the proposed charter that has been criticized by secularists and civil rights groups for limiting personal freedoms and emphasizing Sharia law by allowing clerics to be consulted on legislation.
WORLD
December 16, 2013 | By Amro Hassan
CAIRO -- The pictures were supposed to depict a cross-section of Egyptian society. But they somehow didn't look quite right -- and as it turned out, they weren't. A massive banner that was displayed Sunday during a nationally televised news conference kicking off the campaign to win popular approval for a rewritten version of Egypt's constitution showed five people, at least three of whom turned out to be non-Egyptians . Facebook and Twitter users swiftly posted links to stock photographs of the three, depicting a doctor, a businesswoman and a young man.  The doctor appeared in an advertisement on a website that sells treatments for stretch marks.
WORLD
November 16, 2010 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
After decades of war, ruin and dashed aspirations, southern Sudan moved a step closer to independence Monday as thousands registered to vote in a referendum that early next year could split Africa's largest country in two. The voter registration drive, marred by delays and political wrangling, began at about 2,700 centers around Sudan. The bulk of the turnout was in the semiautonomous south, dominated by animists and Christians, which on Jan. 9 is expected to secede from the mostly Muslim government in the north controlled by President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir.
WORLD
September 3, 2009 | Chris Kraul, Kraul is a special correspondent.
Colombian President Alvaro Uribe has cleared the last legislative hurdle to running for a third term, a prospect that his U.S. allies look upon with ambivalence. By a vote of 85 to 5, the lower house of Congress late Tuesday greenlighted a voter referendum early next year that could pave the way for Uribe to be on the May presidential ballot. The Senate approved the measure last month. If so, it would be the second time Uribe has circumvented a constitutional ban on reelection, a measure many Latin American countries put into law to prevent the ascension of caudillos , or political leaders who have kept themselves in power.
WORLD
October 16, 2009 | Liz Sly
Plans to hold a referendum that could have accelerated the withdrawal of American forces have quietly been shelved, as even those Iraqi politicians who were pushing for the poll conclude that it would no longer be a useful exercise. Sunni Muslim politicians had wanted the referendum on the U.S.-Iraqi security pact to be held in January, at the same time as national elections. But with the clock ticking on preparations for the elections and parliament still deadlocked over a new election law, there is now not enough time to also draft and approve the legislation required to simultaneously hold a referendum, legislators say. Perhaps more significant, the political will to hold a referendum appears to have evaporated amid the realization that U.S. troops are leaving anyway, and that it may not be in Iraq's interests to have them pull out even sooner.
NATIONAL
September 9, 2013 | By Mark Z. Barabak
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - After 30 minutes of praise to God and several rollicking, hand-clapping hymns, John Morse stepped to the glass pulpit and offered a prayer of his own. "We need you to reach down deep," Morse, the state Senate president, told about 100 worshipers seated Sunday beneath a vaulted ceiling at Grace Be Unto You Outreach Church. "I need you not to just support me," he said, slowing down to emphasize each word. "I need you to vote no. " Last winter, Morse helped push through the Legislature a sweeping package of gun laws in response to the December massacre at Connecticut's Sandy Hook Elementary School.
WORLD
March 16, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
PEREVALNE, Ukraine - Shortly after hundreds of polling stations opened across the breakaway Ukraine's Autonomous Republic of Crimea on Sunday, it became increasingly clear that after 23 years of being part of the Ukraine Crimean peninsula washed by the Black Sea in its south made albeit an illegitimate but quite effective leap toward rejoining Russia, to which Crimea had belonged for over three centuries before. The referendum, declared illegal by the Interim Government in Kiev and by all the Western powers, would have hardly happened at all without the impressive assistance of Russian armed forces which have de facto occupied the breakaway peninsula since the end of February, when the  heavily armed Russian commandos captured the government and parliament buildings in the regional capital of Simferopol and installed the pro-Kremlin government, immediately asking for military and economic assistance from Russia.
WORLD
March 16, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
SIMFEROPOL, Ukraine - Partial election results released late Sunday showed Crimean voters overwhelmingly supporting a referendum measure that would see their region break away from Ukraine and join Russia. With half the ballots counted, Mikhail Malyshev, head of the Crimea Election Commission, said in televised remarks that more than 95% of voters approved the option of annexation with Russia over a second option offered, which called for seeking more autonomy within Ukraine. The referendum was widely denounced by the United States, much of Europe and Ukraine's acting government, which came to power last month after protests drove pro-Russian President Viktor Yanukovich from power, as an illegal seizure of Ukraine's territory.
WORLD
March 15, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - Russia stood alone Saturday in vetoing a United Nations Security Council resolution declaring illegal a Russian-sponsored referendum on whether Crimea should secede from Ukraine. In an illustration of Russia's isolation on the issue, 13 council members voted for the U.S.-sponsored resolution at the session in New York. China, which almost always allies itself with Russia on council votes, abstained. It has been clear for days that the resolution would be vetoed. But U.S. officials and allies pushed ahead with it to put Moscow in a difficult spot in hopes of convincing it not to annex Crimea following the Sunday referendum.
WORLD
March 12, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The leaders of Germany and Poland warned Russia on Wednesday that it has until Monday to agree to work with an international "contact group" to resolve the crisis in Ukraine's Crimea region or face immediate sanctions. At a meeting in Warsaw, Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk and German Chancellor Angela Merkel put the Kremlin on notice that what are seen as its provocative moves aimed at annexing Crimea -- despite Moscow's disavowal -- threatened to dramatically escalate tensions throughout Europe.
WORLD
March 12, 2014 | By Christi Parsons, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
WASHINGTON -- President Obama is scheduled to host the new Ukrainian prime minister at the White House on Wednesday as the U.S. and allies prepare for a coming referendum on whether the Crimea region of the European nation should become independent. White House advisors say Prime Minister Arseny Yatsenyuk's Oval Office visit is meant to send a message to Russian President Vladimir Putin that the U.S. supports the legitimacy of the new Ukrainian government. It comes as leaders of the Group of 7 nations called Wednesday on Russia to drop its efforts to change the status of Crimea.
WORLD
March 11, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW - Ukraine's Crimea region would become an independent country if voters approve secession in a hastily organized referendum Sunday, the Russian-controlled regional parliament declared Tuesday in a shift away from plans for immediate annexation to Russia. The change appeared to mark a change in strategy by Moscow to shield itself from accusations that it has orchestrated an illegal seizure of another country's territory. European Union and U.S. officials have threatened trade and travel sanctions against Russia if it persists in encouraging the predominantly ethnic Russian-populated Crimean peninsula to vote for cleaving itself from Ukraine.
WORLD
November 2, 2011 | By Henry Chu and Anthee Carassava, Los Angeles Times
Europe's latest plan to claw its way out of a monumental debt crisis lies in grave doubt less than a week after being cobbled together, following a shocking move to put the accord to a popular vote in Greece that threw both the government there and financial markets around the world into turmoil. Confounded officials, analysts and investors were left struggling to divine what they saw as Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou lobbing a grenade into Europe's attempts to keep his country afloat by calling for a referendum on the new rescue package.
NATIONAL
October 9, 2010 | By Lisa Mascaro, Tribune Washington Bureau
Rep. John A. Boehner (R-Ohio), the House Republican leader, returned to the campaign trail Friday with a speech that attempted to frame the November election as a referendum on the Obama administration's agenda ? rather than simply a choice between candidates. The speech represented the return of a defiant Boehner who delivered what is becoming his signature cry of "Hell, no!" as he takes on President Obama and congressional Democrats. "Ladies and gentlemen, your government hasn't been listening," Boehner said at a small manufacturing firm in West Chester, Ohio, a community in his home district.
WORLD
March 6, 2014 | By Christi Parsons and Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - President Obama on Thursday declared that a referendum asking Crimean voters if they want to join Russia would violate Ukraine's constitution and international law, and he promised to keep ramping up the pressure on Russia until it stands down in the region. “In 2014, we are well beyond the days when borders can be redrawn over the heads of democratic leaders,” the president said in the White House briefing room. Obama also said he is tightening sanctions as part of an effort to “impose a cost” on Russia for its intervention, and he praised the European Union for taking similar steps to penalize those involved in the dispute.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|