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Referendums California

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NEWS
August 10, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for Los Angeles and other cities, the state Supreme Court reversed itself Thursday and held that officials need not provide details of proposed low-rent public housing projects before seeking voter approval. The decision removed a significant legal threat to about 70,000 housing units in California--30,000 of them in Los Angeles--that have been approved in previous elections but not yet constructed.
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NEWS
June 3, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Underscoring the differences between rural and urban Californians, a proposal to split the state in two got a warm reception in the northern hinterlands Tuesday but was headed for defeat in three Bay Area counties.
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NEWS
March 15, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Secretary of State March Fong Eu said the Legislature did, in fact, act in time to qualify school construction and earthquake bond measures for the June 5 election. Eu late last week said the Legislature had passed the deadline to qualify for the June election and indicated that there was little chance the measures would make the ballot.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for Los Angeles and other cities, the state Supreme Court reversed itself Thursday and held that officials need not provide details of proposed low-rent public housing projects before seeking voter approval. The decision removed a significant legal threat to about 70,000 housing units in California--30,000 of them in Los Angeles--that have been approved in previous elections but not yet constructed.
NEWS
June 3, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Underscoring the differences between rural and urban Californians, a proposal to split the state in two got a warm reception in the northern hinterlands Tuesday but was headed for defeat in three Bay Area counties.
NEWS
March 14, 1990 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With their political brinkmanship about to blow up on them, lawmakers Tuesday finally approved and sent to Gov. George Deukmejian school construction and earthquake bond measures they hope to put up for a vote in the June 5 election. Despite all-but-unanimous approval in four votes in the Assembly and Senate on Tuesday, it was far from certain whether the Legislature acted in time for Secretary of State March Fong Eu to meet legal and printing deadlines to get the bonds on the ballot.
NEWS
October 30, 1996 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's drug policy chief said in a television interview to be broadcast this week that the federal government would prosecute California doctors who recommend the use of marijuana if the state legalizes it for medical use. Barry McCaffrey, Clinton's drug czar and the administration's most vocal critic of Proposition 215, said during a TV appearance taped Monday that federal officials would continue to enforce U.S. laws against marijuana and called the ballot measure "a hoax."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2007 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
SACRAMENTO -- A high-stakes political battle may be coming to a shopping center near you. On one side are a union and a racetrack owner asking people to sign petitions that would undo Indian gambling deals. On the other are Southern California tribes hoping to thwart them by persuading people not to sign -- or to withdraw their names.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1988 | PATRICIA KLEIN LERNER, Times Staff Writer
The City of Westlake Village will hold a special election in April to decide whether a mobile-home park should be allowed to expand and begin selling spaces to tenants. The City Council voted unanimously Wednesday to hold an election April 19 to resolve a growing dispute over Oak Forest Mobile Estates. The city approved ordinances last fall that would allow the park to expand by 35 units, to 197, and to begin offering park residents the chance to buy their spaces.
NEWS
March 9, 2000 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legislators and government scholars fear that a daring, highly successful gamble by America's largest insurance companies to overturn right-to-sue laws using Tuesday's ballot will inspire similar efforts by big-money interests to kill laws they don't like.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Secretary of State March Fong Eu said the Legislature did, in fact, act in time to qualify school construction and earthquake bond measures for the June 5 election. Eu late last week said the Legislature had passed the deadline to qualify for the June election and indicated that there was little chance the measures would make the ballot.
NEWS
March 14, 1990 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With their political brinkmanship about to blow up on them, lawmakers Tuesday finally approved and sent to Gov. George Deukmejian school construction and earthquake bond measures they hope to put up for a vote in the June 5 election. Despite all-but-unanimous approval in four votes in the Assembly and Senate on Tuesday, it was far from certain whether the Legislature acted in time for Secretary of State March Fong Eu to meet legal and printing deadlines to get the bonds on the ballot.
OPINION
June 8, 1997 | David M. O'Brien, David M. O'Brien, a professor of government at the University of Virginia, is the author of several books about the Supreme Court, including "Storm Center: The Supreme Court in American Politics" (Norton)
In times like these, the judiciary appears to be the only branch of the national government working to resolve social conflicts. Ironically, though the courts loom ever larger for a public increasingly distrustful of politics, critics continue bashing the federal bench. The conviction in federal district court of Timothy J. McVeigh as a terrorist dramatizes the crucial role that the judiciary plays.
NEWS
October 25, 1988 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Staff Writer
The most important question about Proposition 105 on the Nov. 8 ballot is not whether it will pass or what it would accomplish, but is it legal?
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