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Referendums Canada

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NEWS
September 8, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Quebec's separatist government Thursday officially launched the French-speaking province toward an Oct. 30 referendum that could split Canada into two countries. Quebec Premier Jacques Parizeau unveiled a ballot question in Quebec City that, as expected, attempts to cushion the uncertainties of the province's independence with an offer to negotiate an economic partnership with what would remain of Canada.
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NEWS
September 8, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Quebec's separatist government Thursday officially launched the French-speaking province toward an Oct. 30 referendum that could split Canada into two countries. Quebec Premier Jacques Parizeau unveiled a ballot question in Quebec City that, as expected, attempts to cushion the uncertainties of the province's independence with an offer to negotiate an economic partnership with what would remain of Canada.
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NEWS
October 27, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canadians overwhelmingly rejected a sweeping package of constitutional amendments that were put to a rare national referendum Monday. The amendments were written by Canada's office-holding elite in an effort to keep united this fractious, three-ocean country, the world's largest political entity after Russia. But the unambiguous "no" will certainly scuttle the entire package and open a new and uncertain chapter in Canadian history.
NEWS
October 28, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that Canadian voters have roundly defeated their government's latest set of proposals for unifying the country--voting no in a rare and historic national referendum--important questions remain for America's northern neighbor: Will the French-speaking province of Quebec now move toward independence, making good on a decades-old threat and finally rupturing this often-fractious 125-year-old confederation?
NEWS
September 4, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Brian Mulroney said Thursday that Canadians will get a chance to vote Oct. 26 on whether to accept a sweeping package of constitutional amendments designed to keep this country together. "It's time for Canadians to choose," Mulroney said. The amendments, which took months to draft, would make fundamental changes in many basic institutions of Canadian government.
NEWS
October 28, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that Canadian voters have roundly defeated their government's latest set of proposals for unifying the country--voting no in a rare and historic national referendum--important questions remain for America's northern neighbor: Will the French-speaking province of Quebec now move toward independence, making good on a decades-old threat and finally rupturing this often-fractious 125-year-old confederation?
NEWS
October 26, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canadian voters will go to the polls today to vote on whether their national constitution should be amended according to a sweeping set of proposals written in hopes of keeping the country united. This is the first time Canada has held a nationwide referendum in half a century, and emotions are running high. One recent opinion survey found that 87% of adult Canadians are planning to vote. Legally, the referendum is non-binding.
NEWS
October 27, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canadians overwhelmingly rejected a sweeping package of constitutional amendments that were put to a rare national referendum Monday. The amendments were written by Canada's office-holding elite in an effort to keep united this fractious, three-ocean country, the world's largest political entity after Russia. But the unambiguous "no" will certainly scuttle the entire package and open a new and uncertain chapter in Canadian history.
NEWS
October 26, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canadian voters will go to the polls today to vote on whether their national constitution should be amended according to a sweeping set of proposals written in hopes of keeping the country united. This is the first time Canada has held a nationwide referendum in half a century, and emotions are running high. One recent opinion survey found that 87% of adult Canadians are planning to vote. Legally, the referendum is non-binding.
NEWS
September 4, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Brian Mulroney said Thursday that Canadians will get a chance to vote Oct. 26 on whether to accept a sweeping package of constitutional amendments designed to keep this country together. "It's time for Canadians to choose," Mulroney said. The amendments, which took months to draft, would make fundamental changes in many basic institutions of Canadian government.
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