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Referendums Ireland

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NEWS
November 27, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early returns from Ireland's national election suggested late Thursday that no political party would gain a majority to govern and that a referendum allowing legal abortion in special cases would be defeated. The tallies indicated that Prime Minister Albert Reynolds' Fianna Fail party, Ireland's largest, would lose several seats. The No. 2 party, Fine Gael, also was slipping, while the No. 3 Labor Party appeared to be sharply up, the early results showed.
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NEWS
November 25, 1995 | From Reuters
Ireland voted Friday in a knife-edge refer endum pitting church against state that could scrap a 70-year-old ban on divorce. There was a high turnout in sunny Dublin, which could tilt the balance toward scrapping the constitutional ban when final results are known today, pollsters said. Traditionally more liberal in outlook and voting patterns, Dublin is home to the majority of Ireland's 2.
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NEWS
November 25, 1995 | From Reuters
Ireland voted Friday in a knife-edge refer endum pitting church against state that could scrap a 70-year-old ban on divorce. There was a high turnout in sunny Dublin, which could tilt the balance toward scrapping the constitutional ban when final results are known today, pollsters said. Traditionally more liberal in outlook and voting patterns, Dublin is home to the majority of Ireland's 2.
MAGAZINE
January 3, 1993 | KATE O'CALLAGHAN, Born in southern Ireland, Kate O'Callaghan is a free-lance journalist now based in New York City.
I HAVE TO BE HOME BEFORE THEY MISS ME." THE YOUNG WOMAN WAS SO NERVOUS SHE could hardly get the words out. She lay, small and exhausted, in the corner bed, her brown eyes huge with anxiety, her hair starkly black against her pale face and the white bedspread. Along with five others, she was awaiting an abortion in a small ward of London's Marie Stopes Parkview Clinic. Three of the women came from Northern Ireland; she was from the Republic of Ireland.
MAGAZINE
January 3, 1993 | KATE O'CALLAGHAN, Born in southern Ireland, Kate O'Callaghan is a free-lance journalist now based in New York City.
I HAVE TO BE HOME BEFORE THEY MISS ME." THE YOUNG WOMAN WAS SO NERVOUS SHE could hardly get the words out. She lay, small and exhausted, in the corner bed, her brown eyes huge with anxiety, her hair starkly black against her pale face and the white bedspread. Along with five others, she was awaiting an abortion in a small ward of London's Marie Stopes Parkview Clinic. Three of the women came from Northern Ireland; she was from the Republic of Ireland.
NEWS
November 24, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ireland will vote Wednesday in a national election that nobody wanted--and which is expected to provide only inconclusive results. None of the Irish political parties is expected to garner a clear majority in the 166-seat Dail, or Parliament, so that a round of political horse-trading will be necessary for one of the two major parties to form a coalition government.
NEWS
November 27, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early returns from Ireland's national election suggested late Thursday that no political party would gain a majority to govern and that a referendum allowing legal abortion in special cases would be defeated. The tallies indicated that Prime Minister Albert Reynolds' Fianna Fail party, Ireland's largest, would lose several seats. The No. 2 party, Fine Gael, also was slipping, while the No. 3 Labor Party appeared to be sharply up, the early results showed.
NEWS
November 24, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ireland will vote Wednesday in a national election that nobody wanted--and which is expected to provide only inconclusive results. None of the Irish political parties is expected to garner a clear majority in the 166-seat Dail, or Parliament, so that a round of political horse-trading will be necessary for one of the two major parties to form a coalition government.
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