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Referendums Japan

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NEWS
July 6, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Far from the center of Japan's ruling elite, local citizens are rising up against the political establishment in a spreading wave of direct democracy reaching from mountain towns to balmy beach areas. Next month, residents of Makimachi in Niigata prefecture vote on whether to allow a nuclear power plant in their town. In September, Okinawans will vote on whether they support a reduction in the U.S.
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NEWS
January 26, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine that an American city held a referendum on whether to build a billion-dollar dam and residents voted more than 10 to 1 against it--but the government refused to abandon its construction plans. Japan is in a furor over just such a scenario. It began Sunday when residents of the city of Tokushima voted 102,759 to 9,367 against building a dam across the Yoshino River on the island of Shikoku.
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NEWS
January 26, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine that an American city held a referendum on whether to build a billion-dollar dam and residents voted more than 10 to 1 against it--but the government refused to abandon its construction plans. Japan is in a furor over just such a scenario. It began Sunday when residents of the city of Tokushima voted 102,759 to 9,367 against building a dam across the Yoshino River on the island of Shikoku.
NEWS
August 5, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 27 years, this seaside town of pine-dotted hills and verdant fields has been torn apart by the nemesis of nuclear power as harsh debates over safety, necessity and economic benefits divided neighbors and friends.
NEWS
August 5, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 27 years, this seaside town of pine-dotted hills and verdant fields has been torn apart by the nemesis of nuclear power as harsh debates over safety, necessity and economic benefits divided neighbors and friends.
NEWS
July 6, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Far from the center of Japan's ruling elite, local citizens are rising up against the political establishment in a spreading wave of direct democracy reaching from mountain towns to balmy beach areas. Next month, residents of Makimachi in Niigata prefecture vote on whether to allow a nuclear power plant in their town. In September, Okinawans will vote on whether they support a reduction in the U.S.
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