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NEWS
December 12, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Escalating Russia's gravest political crisis, an uncowed Congress of People's Deputies voted Friday to bar President Boris N. Yeltsin from calling a nationwide referendum that could cut short its term, as a furious Yeltsin had demanded the day before. But simultaneously, parleys between the reformist president and the conservative-dominated Parliament began behind closed doors at 8:30 a.m.
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NEWS
April 27, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The morning after the big vote, Boris N. Yeltsin may have felt like a man who had kissed his sister. Proving he still can work his populist magic, Russia's president won an unexpectedly emphatic endorsement of his leadership at the polls. But he fell several million votes short of persuading enough fellow citizens to demand the ouster of the men and women he charges are torpedoing his reforms--Russia's Congress of People's Deputies and lawmakers at all other levels. So now what?
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NEWS
February 10, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin backed away Tuesday from an electoral test of strength with conservative lawmakers by dropping his insistence on an April referendum that he had hoped would bolster his executive powers. Instead, he called for "a year of moratorium on all political fistfighting" to let Russia stabilize its plummeting economy, followed by elections of lawmakers in 1994 and a new president in 1995--each a year ahead of schedule.
NEWS
April 27, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heartened by a strong vote of confidence in President Boris N. Yeltsin, his supporters Monday urged him to use the mandate to hasten democratic reforms. But his opponents warned that the battle for power in Russia is far from over. Yeltsin, who had hoped the referendum would end a paralyzing power struggle between himself and the conservative Parliament, refrained from claiming immediate victory in the referendum and instead awaited final official results that are expected today.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | From Associated Press
President Boris N. Yeltsin told a U.S. congressional delegation Wednesday that he will travel across Russia to rally support before an April 25 referendum that parliamentary hard-liners have stacked against him. The delegation, headed by House Majority Leader Richard A. Gephardt (D-Mo.), arrived in Moscow on Tuesday after a two-day visit to Kiev, Ukraine. The 15 lawmakers met with Yeltsin and then with his main political opponent, Parliament Chairman Ruslan I. Khasbulatov.
NEWS
April 27, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The morning after the big vote, Boris N. Yeltsin may have felt like a man who had kissed his sister. Proving he still can work his populist magic, Russia's president won an unexpectedly emphatic endorsement of his leadership at the polls. But he fell several million votes short of persuading enough fellow citizens to demand the ouster of the men and women he charges are torpedoing his reforms--Russia's Congress of People's Deputies and lawmakers at all other levels. So now what?
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since he launched a grueling pre-referendum campaign last week, a visibly tired Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin laid out his plans for the various possible outcomes of the nationwide poll set for April 25, reiterating that he would quit if the vote goes against him but in favor of the conservative Parliament.
NEWS
April 14, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boris N. Yeltsin brought his political roadshow and his quest for votes to the Siberian capital of coal and steel Tuesday, recalling how when the chips were down, the hardy miners of the Kuzbass had rallied to his side. But this visit was no triumph. The Russian president's foray into his country's most important coal-mining region revealed both his weakening status and the flaws in his campaign to win a national referendum later this month.
NEWS
April 11, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like any incumbent facing a tough challenge at the polls, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin is dipping deep into the pork barrel to firm up citizen support and woo voters ranging from Russia's rebellious Cossacks to Afghan war veterans. "I'm not hanging on to my armchair," Yeltsin told Muscovites on the street Saturday, using an expression referring to clinging to one's job. "But Russia must be saved."
NEWS
April 26, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nose to nose near the ballot box, 66-year-old Valentina Varlamova and 63-year-old Klavdia Sivakova slugged it out in a verbal battle that embodied the choice Russians faced as they voted in Sunday's referendum. "I want to live under a socialist system," Sivakova, a doctor and member of the reconstituted Communist Party, proclaimed. "I want to go back to the Soviet regime. I think it was more humane."
NEWS
April 26, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nose to nose near the ballot box, 66-year-old Valentina Varlamova and 63-year-old Klavdia Sivakova slugged it out in a verbal battle that embodied the choice Russians faced as they voted in Sunday's referendum. "I want to live under a socialist system," Sivakova, a doctor and member of the reconstituted Communist Party, proclaimed. "I want to go back to the Soviet regime. I think it was more humane."
NEWS
April 26, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Russian man, convinced that authorities at polling station No. 19 were trying to sabotage Sunday's referendum results to hurt President Boris N. Yeltsin, organized his fellow voters and blocked voting for two hours in protest. The confusion was caused by an erroneous statement on TV by the chairman of the Central Election Commission that ballots would be valid only if they bore two official signatures and a seal.
NEWS
April 26, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russians solemnly cast their first ballots of the post-Soviet era Sunday in a referendum on Boris N. Yeltsin and his free-market reforms. But a low turnout made it doubtful that the exercise will end the power struggle between the president and the Communist-dominated Parliament. Surveys of voters leaving the polls indicated that Russia's first democratically elected president would achieve a clear vote of confidence in his leadership and narrower approval for his controversial reform program.
NEWS
April 26, 1993 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't supposed to happen this way. Last October, 19-year-old Elina Shendelman, with her parents, said goodby to Moscow and to the chance that her first vote would fall into a Russian ballot box. But on Sunday it did--along with the votes of more than 200 other Russian emigres in the Los Angeles area who turned out, most of them apparently to support Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, for an unprecedented voting arrangement.
NEWS
April 25, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Placing the country's and his own fate in ordinary Russians' hands, President Boris N. Yeltsin on Saturday asked his people to back him in a "peaceful breakthrough to the future" to bury forever the political system left by the Soviet Union. In a televised address on the eve of today's nationwide referendum, a firm and visibly self-assured Yeltsin told his country that "my possibilities for carrying out the course of reform wholly and fully depend on how you vote April 25."
NEWS
April 25, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They feel impoverished, deceived. They don't like the way Russia's reforms are turning out. They have little hope for the near future. But they don't want to go back to the old Communist order. This, pollsters say, is the Russian electorate--the people who cast their ballots today in a climactic referendum that will decide President Boris N. Yeltsin's political fate.
NEWS
April 25, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Placing the country's and his own fate in ordinary Russians' hands, President Boris N. Yeltsin on Saturday asked his people to back him in a "peaceful breakthrough to the future" to bury forever the political system left by the Soviet Union. In a televised address on the eve of today's nationwide referendum, a firm and visibly self-assured Yeltsin told his country that "my possibilities for carrying out the course of reform wholly and fully depend on how you vote April 25."
NEWS
March 30, 1993
Here are the questions that Russia's Congress of People's Deputies wants to ask the Russian people in an April 25 referendum: * Do you have confidence in Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin? * Do you approve of the socioeconomic policy carried out by the president of the Russian Federation and the government of the Russian Federation since 1992? * Do you consider it necessary to hold early elections for the president of the Russian Federation?
NEWS
April 24, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime-time television viewers across Russia got a rare perspective on their gruff, no-nonsense leader the other evening. Naina Yeltsin, a shy woman who shuns publicity, was on the air, describing her husband as a soft-hearted man who never quarrels with her or utters swear words. The hourlong film, "A Day in the Life of the President's Family," was the main act so far in Boris N.
NEWS
April 24, 1993 | Associated Press
President Boris N. Yeltsin on Friday offered Russians a vision of their future if they support him in this weekend's referendum: private land ownership, a stronger executive branch and a U.S.-style legislature. Yeltsin said he sketched the draft constitution so citizens would know "a vote of confidence in the president is a vote not for an abstract and bright future but for concrete, legal guarantees, civil rights and human values."
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