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Referendums South Africa

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NEWS
March 10, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every night this month, Henoch and Thilana Kruger have watched the television news from the comfort of their middle-class home, wrestling with their consciences and their future. "Now is the time to make a decision," said Henoch Kruger, a 35-year-old banker. "But I'm sitting on the wire here. I cannot decide which way to go."
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NEWS
March 17, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a final push for today's crucial referendum, South Africa's white leaders Monday took out newspaper advertisements, handed out leaflets and appeared on radio talk shows to persuade thousands of still-undecided voters to make a final break with apartheid. President Frederik W. de Klerk, who has vowed to resign if he loses, said in an open letter to South Africans that a "no" vote would "lead us to a dead end of division and destruction." De Klerk's foreign minister, Roelof F.
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NEWS
March 14, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The emotional campaign for next week's white referendum on President Frederik W. de Klerk's reforms turned dirty Friday when a bomb exploded at offices of the ruling National Party and right-wing students shouted "traitor" and threw placards at the president. In the confrontation at the University of Pretoria, De Klerk was struck on the head by a placard thrown by a student and was jostled by charging right-wing protesters who scuffled with the president's security guards.
NEWS
March 16, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a bitter and emotional three-week campaign, South Africa's white minority goes to the polls Tuesday faced with a choice between two visions of apocalypse. Vote to end President Frederik W. de Klerk's reforms, say the president's supporters, and see the country racked anew by sanctions, Draconian emergency decrees, racial segregation laws, sports boycotts, township revolts and guerrilla war.
NEWS
March 16, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a bitter and emotional three-week campaign, South Africa's white minority goes to the polls Tuesday faced with a choice between two visions of apocalypse. Vote to end President Frederik W. de Klerk's reforms, say the president's supporters, and see the country racked anew by sanctions, Draconian emergency decrees, racial segregation laws, sports boycotts, township revolts and guerrilla war.
NEWS
February 21, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Frederik W. de Klerk, in a daring challenge to his right-wing critics, announced Thursday a nationwide referendum for white voters to test support for his program to reform apartheid--and promised that his government will resign if he loses. The balloting, which De Klerk said will be held within six weeks, may be the most important in modern South African history.
NEWS
March 17, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a final push for today's crucial referendum, South Africa's white leaders Monday took out newspaper advertisements, handed out leaflets and appeared on radio talk shows to persuade thousands of still-undecided voters to make a final break with apartheid. President Frederik W. de Klerk, who has vowed to resign if he loses, said in an open letter to South Africans that a "no" vote would "lead us to a dead end of division and destruction." De Klerk's foreign minister, Roelof F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1992 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was not without a sense of irony that Anthony Gordon stood in line earlier this week at the South African consulate to cast his vote in favor of President Frederik W. de Klerk's policy of dismantling apartheid. After all, it was the bitter politics of racial divisiveness that drove him from his homeland years ago.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pieter W. Botha, the crusty former president who took the first tentative steps toward ending apartheid in the 1980s, announced Saturday that he will vote "no" in President Frederik W. de Klerk's reform referendum March 17. "I cannot participate in . . . a direction of suicide for my own people," the 76-year-old Botha said in a statement from his seaside retirement home. "Like my honored predecessors, I believe in the self-determination of peoples."
NEWS
February 25, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Frederik W. de Klerk, facing a make-or-break test of his government's apartheid reform program, Monday unveiled the question he will put to white voters in a nationwide referendum. He suggested that, if he wins, it will be the last referendum of white voters only in the country.
NEWS
March 14, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The emotional campaign for next week's white referendum on President Frederik W. de Klerk's reforms turned dirty Friday when a bomb exploded at offices of the ruling National Party and right-wing students shouted "traitor" and threw placards at the president. In the confrontation at the University of Pretoria, De Klerk was struck on the head by a placard thrown by a student and was jostled by charging right-wing protesters who scuffled with the president's security guards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1992 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was not without a sense of irony that Anthony Gordon stood in line earlier this week at the South African consulate to cast his vote in favor of President Frederik W. de Klerk's policy of dismantling apartheid. After all, it was the bitter politics of racial divisiveness that drove him from his homeland years ago.
NEWS
March 10, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every night this month, Henoch and Thilana Kruger have watched the television news from the comfort of their middle-class home, wrestling with their consciences and their future. "Now is the time to make a decision," said Henoch Kruger, a 35-year-old banker. "But I'm sitting on the wire here. I cannot decide which way to go."
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pieter W. Botha, the crusty former president who took the first tentative steps toward ending apartheid in the 1980s, announced Saturday that he will vote "no" in President Frederik W. de Klerk's reform referendum March 17. "I cannot participate in . . . a direction of suicide for my own people," the 76-year-old Botha said in a statement from his seaside retirement home. "Like my honored predecessors, I believe in the self-determination of peoples."
NEWS
February 25, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Frederik W. de Klerk, facing a make-or-break test of his government's apartheid reform program, Monday unveiled the question he will put to white voters in a nationwide referendum. He suggested that, if he wins, it will be the last referendum of white voters only in the country.
NEWS
February 21, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Frederik W. de Klerk, in a daring challenge to his right-wing critics, announced Thursday a nationwide referendum for white voters to test support for his program to reform apartheid--and promised that his government will resign if he loses. The balloting, which De Klerk said will be held within six weeks, may be the most important in modern South African history.
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