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Refinance

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BUSINESS
October 8, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Homeowners hustled last week to refinance their mortgages after interest rates fell below 5% for the first time since May. Refinance applications rose 18% from the previous week, the Mortgage Bankers Assn. reported, as rates on 30-year home loans dropped to their lowest level in four months to an average of 4.89%. With extra cash lining their pockets each month, homeowners could help the economy recover. Since the recession began, consumers have reined in spending, which accounts for up to 70% of the U.S. economy.
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AUTOS
March 14, 2014 | By David Undercoffler
It is a mix of emotions only an Italian car can evoke. Maserati's all-new Ghibli and redesigned Quattroporte sedans thrill with all the lusty performance and high style expected from a brand with a loose connection to Ferrari. But - mama mia! - pity anyone hoping to roll down the window or turn on the lights in either of these Maseratis. This poor soul encounters third-rate plastic pieces that Maserati grabbed out of Chrysler's corporate parts bin. After a week of testing both the 2014 Ghibli and the 2014 Quattroporte, we were left more than a little frustrated by how a shoddy interior can foul an otherwise delizioso dish.
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REAL ESTATE
September 20, 1992
I take exception to certain comments by Robert J. Bruss in the Aug. 23 story "Questions to Ask When Refinancing." It is unrealistic to only apply with lenders that will lock in the interest rate in writing for at least 60 days. While it is true that certain types of adjustable mortgages can be locked for 60 days, when it comes to conforming or jumbo fixed-rate loans, the more attractive pricing is available for the shorter lock-in periods. If a borrower waits until his loan request is approved before locking in, lenders are willing to offer their 10- to 20-day locks.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By David Pagel
The lines in Bart Exposito's new paintings at Thomas Solomon Gallery do things the lines in his old paintings didn't: slip away from the shapes they demarcate to float in spaces that are more atmospheric than anything the artist has painted since he began exhibiting 15 years ago. This transformation may have something to do with Exposito's recent move from Los Angeles to Santa Fe and his commute to Albuquerque, where he teaches. Like the landscape he drives through, most of his new works are horizontal.
REAL ESTATE
March 4, 1990
Regarding deduction of the cost of points on the refinance of a home residence on your income tax, both Robert Bruss, and now Benny L. Kass are giving out incorrect information. While it is true that points are not usually deductible in one year on a refinance, but must be amortized over the life of the loan, there are exceptions. Before our refinance this year, I carefully investigated with the IRS, and found out that if the points are paid out of separate funds rather than the funds advanced by lender through the refinancing, and if a portion of the refinance money is used to improve your home, the points may be deducted in full in the same year.
REAL ESTATE
September 1, 2002
Regarding "Before You Redo Your Loan, Do the Math" by Diane Wedner (Aug. 25): For homeowners who already are more than halfway through their loan, there is a 10-year, fixed-rate, fully amortized loan under a FannieMae/Freddie Mac program. People refinance to save not on the "nominal" rate of interest per se, but to save on the aggregates of principal and interest over the remaining life of the debt obligation. Also, many lenders will waive the pre-payment penalty to their borrowers if they are the holders of the existing loans.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2008
Since Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke is willing to bail out Bear Stearns, help Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and now plans to help out banks with their financial problems, why haven't he and the Fed helped the subprime and other mortgage holders who can't make their monthly payments? ("Federal regulators prepare to tighten mortgage rules," July 9) Wouldn't it have been wiser to refinance all those mortgages instead of foreclosing on the homes? It appears the credit crisis was caused by investment banks and commercial banks selling bundled loans as securities, as well as other risky financial actions.
REAL ESTATE
July 7, 1996
Warning: Construction defect lawsuits in condos can be hazardous to your financial health. At least that is what my husband and I found out. We own a condo in Spring Valley, Calif. Last year, our homeowners association decided to sue the builder for defects that to this day we cannot see. It's been a nightmare. As a result, we couldn't refinance our condo's mortgage. And now that we are trying to sell it, we have discovered that buyers don't want any part of a condo involved in a lawsuit.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2001
"Bears Refuse to Go Into Hibernation" [July 8] showed the other side of the economic coin, which often is not reported. There are many who sense that the economy is still in a bubble mode, where it has been kept going by a huge accumulation of debt, both business and personal. Only so much future income can be committed to present consumption by borrowing, and then you reach a limit. We have invented new debt-creation vehicles such as credit cards, and we refinance loans on houses, whose equity can be withdrawn and spent, all of which have contributed to purchasing power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Owners of the controversial Riverside Freeway toll lanes are seeking to refinance the private thoroughfare in an attempt to lower their debt and eventually eliminate tolls for carpools, motorcyclists and the disabled. Greg Hulsizer, general manager of the 91 Express Lanes, said if the California Private Transportation Co. can refinance, the move will help push the 6-year-old operation closer to profitability.
AUTOS
March 8, 2014 | David Undercoffler
General Motors Co.'s lumbering full-size SUVs are dinosaurs from a bygone era, but don't expect them to go extinct just yet. Despite flagging sales, each delivery brings in piles of cash for GM. "These vehicles are minting money for them," said Dave Sullivan, an analyst at AutoPacific Inc. "It's one of the biggest profit margins in the industry. " GM makes at least $10,000 per full-sized sport utility vehicle sold, he estimates. (Not to mention the windfall for the nearest gas station.)
BUSINESS
March 1, 2014 | By David Undercoffler
Maybe the Muppets weren't such a good idea. Toyota, for those who missed the Super Bowl ad, has enlisted the help of Jim Henson's finest to sell its all-new Highlander SUV. This would be a hoot except for one awkward fact: This thing holds Muppets a lot better than actual people. The new Highlander has less head- and legroom in the third row than the previous generation model. In fact, it has less space back there than nearly all of its SUV and crossover rivals. That's disappointing, particularly because the outside of the Highlander is actually about 3 inches longer.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2014 | By David Undercoffler
They are the bad boys of Subaru's lineup. Offsetting the brand's otherwise crunchy mind-set, the WRX and WRX STI pocket rockets have worked hard to bring some tire-smoking street cred to a brand that otherwise markets its vehicles with love and puppies. Based on the humble Impreza compact sedan, both the everyman WRX and the rally-ready STI are new for 2015. The basics stay the same: turbocharging and all-wheel-drive. But both models get an overhauled chassis, a refined cabin and fresh styling.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2013 | By Brian Thevenot
The bottom-of-the-line Benz always faces a tough question: Is it a real Mercedes? That's a compliment to the venerable German brand's standard-setting build quality. But the question also speaks to the oxymoron inherent in a budget Benz, and the challenge of delivering a bonafide Mercedes for the price of a Ford or a Honda. Such are the hurdles facing the CLA, a compact sport sedan seeking to set a new standard for affordable luxury and tap into a broad customer base of up-and-comers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2013 | By Dan Weikel
Orange County's largest toll road network on Thursday sold $2.3 billion in bonds to shore up the finances of several highways that have failed to meet revenue and ridership projections. The Irvine-based Transportation Corridor Agencies will use the borrowing to refinance the Foothill-Eastern system, which includes the 133 tollway in central Orange County as well as the 241 and 261 that run from Yorba Linda to Rancho Santa Margarita. The bond issue will extend the time that motorists must pay tolls on the Foothill-Eastern's highways by 13 years - from 2040 to 2053 - and add upward of $1.75 billion to the corridor's total interest payments by the time the bonds mature in 2053.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2013 | David Undercoffler
These are happy days for the fun side of Chevrolet, as 2013 has been a very good year for the performance division of General Motors' everyman brand. The all-new, seventh-generation Corvette went on sale in August to critical and consumer acclaim. The topless version of the C7 started shipping to customers this week, and a fire-breathing Z06 model will debut at the Detroit Auto Show in January. Through November, sales of the Corvette are up 228 percent over the same period in 2012.
FOOD
May 10, 2006 | Barbara Hansen, Times staff Writer
THIS rich duck sauce is the basis of a dish called bigoli all' anatra after the thick, rustic semolina spaghetti called bigoli, in Verona, hometown of Chiara Conti of Fabiolus Cafe on Melrose. At Fabiolus, it's a frequent special, served with house-made bigoli, but it can also be served with tagliatelle, ordinary spaghetti or any other pasta cooked al dente.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1989 | John M. Wilson \f7
The London Sunday Telegraph has just paid a whopping $70,000 for first serial rights to "Jacqueline du Pre, A Biography," due out in hardcover in England in June. Du Pre was the world-renowned English cellist whose career was tragically cut short in 1973 by multiple sclerosis when she was 28; she died in 1987. Author Carol Easton told us she had Du Pre's cooperation on the book, but met with "a lot of opposition from her family, because they didn't want anyone getting behind the myth."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
While driving to Aliso Viejo on Tuesday to hear the Juilliard String Quartet play Bach, Schubert and a young American composer, Jesse Jones, at the Soka Performing Arts Center, I listened to a little early Bob Dylan. It seemed right. But so might have Leonard Bernstein, Glenn Gould, something from Stravinsky's Los Angeles years or Aaron Copland. Anything by Miles Davis or Thelonious Monk would have been equally suitable. All were artists on Columbia Records, and in the '40s, '50s and '60s, all were showing the extraordinary originality of North American music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2013 | By Dan Weikel
The leaders of Orange County's largest tollway system cleared the way Thursday for a $2.4-billion bond sale designed to shore up the sagging finances of one of its highway networks. Proceeds from the bonds will be used to refinance the Foothill-Eastern system, where the Transportation Corridor Agencies operates the 241 and 261 tollways. The roads, which course through the hills of east Orange County, have been performing below their ridership and revenue projections. Studies indicate that without a refinancing, the Foothill-Eastern highways would default on their debt payments.
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