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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1991
Re "Clipboard Neighborhood Profile: North Los Alamitos" (March 29): "Fat, red, bulbous" beets may make good borscht, but they are not grown and harvested for their sugar content. As Mr. (Jimmy) Lopez or any good dictionary could have informed the author of this piece, sugar beets are white--just like refined sugar. EDITH L. McCULLOUGH, Placentia
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2008 | Neille Ilel
Opening a second restaurant is like having another baby: Some agonize over it and others are set on a large brood. Jonathan Chu knew Buddha's Belly -- his affordable pan-Asian joint on Beverly -- had to spawn, but it took two years before he found the right location: 2nd Street in Santa Monica. "It's like yoga row right up the street," Chu says, pointing out the mat-toting lovelies who wear a path to and from power yoga every hour. And customers have been wearing a path of their own to Buddha's door since the new spot opened in January, according to Chu. When it came to his next location, Sang Yoon of Father's Office was the ruminating kind: "I didn't think I had the first one down until two years ago."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1985 | From Associated Press
A chromium deficiency may help cause diabetes in some adults, says a government researcher who found a sugary diet makes people excrete more of the metal. "Maturity-onset diabetes is due to many causes, and one of those apparently is chromium deficiency," said nutritionist Richard A. Anderson of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Human Nutrition Research Center. Anderson presented a study last week during the annual meeting of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology.
MAGAZINE
November 18, 2007 | Michael Shaw
As anyone who's ever served Tofurky knows, diet restrictions this time of year can get tricky--especially for practitioners of macrobiotics, an amorphous regimen that prohibits processed foods in order to help balance one's energy.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1997
The European Commission is expected to formally approve today the merger of Boeing Co. and McDonnell Douglas Corp. . . . Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based Republic Industries Inc. said second-quarter earnings more than doubled to $69.5 million, or 17 cents a share, from $30 million, or 9 cents, a year earlier. . . . Pharmacia & Upjohn Inc. said second-quarter profit before one-time items dropped to $178 million, or 34 cents a share, from $269 million, or 51 cents, a year earlier. . . . PepsiCo Inc.
MAGAZINE
November 18, 2007 | Michael Shaw
As anyone who's ever served Tofurky knows, diet restrictions this time of year can get tricky--especially for practitioners of macrobiotics, an amorphous regimen that prohibits processed foods in order to help balance one's energy.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2001 | From Associated Press
Sugar growers will be encouraged to destroy some of their crop for a second consecutive year in an effort to prop up prices and reduce a government-held stockpile. Growers who agree to plow under crops will each be given as much as $20,000 worth of sugar that the government has acquired under a price-support program, the Agriculture Department said Friday. The USDA is paying $1.
NEWS
April 1, 1990
Mathis Chazanov's poignant story (Times, March 18) that escalating costs have brought to an abrupt end (one agency's) provision of kosher meals for the elderly could have a happy ending after all. The sponsoring Jewish Family Service's senior nutrition program need only change to an all vegetarian, vegan (non-dairy) menu to keep costs down while still conforming to kosher requirements and, at the same time, adding to the longevity of the seniors who consume the meals. Senior citizens should note that progressive epidemiologists, nutritionists and physicians are, in increasing numbers, advocating a grain-centered, fiber-rich diet for health and longevity.
HEALTH
November 1, 1999 | SHELDON MARGEN and DALE A. OGAR, Dr. Sheldon Margen is professor of public health at UC Berkeley; Dale A. Ogar is managing editor of the UC Berkeley Wellness Letter. They are the authors of several books, including "The Wellness Encyclopedia of Food and Nutrition."
We recently received two questions about sugar and, frankly, both of them surprised us. The first was from a reader who said she had looked everywhere to find the U.S. Department of Agriculture's recommended daily allowance for sugar and was totally baffled. The second question concerned a rumor that eating sugar removed other nutrients from the body. In order to evaluate what we have to say about sugar, truth-in-advertising laws require us to admit that we both have a sweet tooth.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2008 | Neille Ilel
Opening a second restaurant is like having another baby: Some agonize over it and others are set on a large brood. Jonathan Chu knew Buddha's Belly -- his affordable pan-Asian joint on Beverly -- had to spawn, but it took two years before he found the right location: 2nd Street in Santa Monica. "It's like yoga row right up the street," Chu says, pointing out the mat-toting lovelies who wear a path to and from power yoga every hour. And customers have been wearing a path of their own to Buddha's door since the new spot opened in January, according to Chu. When it came to his next location, Sang Yoon of Father's Office was the ruminating kind: "I didn't think I had the first one down until two years ago."
BUSINESS
September 3, 2001 | From Associated Press
Sugar growers will be encouraged to destroy some of their crop for a second consecutive year in an effort to prop up prices and reduce a government-held stockpile. Growers who agree to plow under crops will each be given as much as $20,000 worth of sugar that the government has acquired under a price-support program, the Agriculture Department said Friday. The USDA is paying $1.
HEALTH
November 1, 1999 | SHELDON MARGEN and DALE A. OGAR, Dr. Sheldon Margen is professor of public health at UC Berkeley; Dale A. Ogar is managing editor of the UC Berkeley Wellness Letter. They are the authors of several books, including "The Wellness Encyclopedia of Food and Nutrition."
We recently received two questions about sugar and, frankly, both of them surprised us. The first was from a reader who said she had looked everywhere to find the U.S. Department of Agriculture's recommended daily allowance for sugar and was totally baffled. The second question concerned a rumor that eating sugar removed other nutrients from the body. In order to evaluate what we have to say about sugar, truth-in-advertising laws require us to admit that we both have a sweet tooth.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1997
The European Commission is expected to formally approve today the merger of Boeing Co. and McDonnell Douglas Corp. . . . Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based Republic Industries Inc. said second-quarter earnings more than doubled to $69.5 million, or 17 cents a share, from $30 million, or 9 cents, a year earlier. . . . Pharmacia & Upjohn Inc. said second-quarter profit before one-time items dropped to $178 million, or 34 cents a share, from $269 million, or 51 cents, a year earlier. . . . PepsiCo Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1991
Re "Clipboard Neighborhood Profile: North Los Alamitos" (March 29): "Fat, red, bulbous" beets may make good borscht, but they are not grown and harvested for their sugar content. As Mr. (Jimmy) Lopez or any good dictionary could have informed the author of this piece, sugar beets are white--just like refined sugar. EDITH L. McCULLOUGH, Placentia
NEWS
April 1, 1990
Mathis Chazanov's poignant story (Times, March 18) that escalating costs have brought to an abrupt end (one agency's) provision of kosher meals for the elderly could have a happy ending after all. The sponsoring Jewish Family Service's senior nutrition program need only change to an all vegetarian, vegan (non-dairy) menu to keep costs down while still conforming to kosher requirements and, at the same time, adding to the longevity of the seniors who consume the meals. Senior citizens should note that progressive epidemiologists, nutritionists and physicians are, in increasing numbers, advocating a grain-centered, fiber-rich diet for health and longevity.
NEWS
July 24, 1987 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
It's Round 2: the American Dietetic Assn. vs. Marilyn and Harvey Diamond, authors of the 1985 blockbuster "Fit for Life." The Diamonds espouse a "natural hygiene" philosophy, contending that the body can heal itself from the inside when a person eats correctly, exercises and reduces stress. They advocate, among other practices, an emphasis on complex carbohydrates (such as fruits, vegetables and grains) and eating certain foods at specific times of the day in specific combinations.
NEWS
July 24, 1987 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
It's Round 2: the American Dietetic Assn. vs. Marilyn and Harvey Diamond, authors of the 1985 blockbuster "Fit for Life." The Diamonds espouse a "natural hygiene" philosophy, contending that the body can heal itself from the inside when a person eats correctly, exercises and reduces stress. They advocate, among other practices, an emphasis on complex carbohydrates (such as fruits, vegetables and grains) and eating certain foods at specific times of the day in specific combinations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1985 | From Associated Press
A chromium deficiency may help cause diabetes in some adults, says a government researcher who found a sugary diet makes people excrete more of the metal. "Maturity-onset diabetes is due to many causes, and one of those apparently is chromium deficiency," said nutritionist Richard A. Anderson of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Human Nutrition Research Center. Anderson presented a study last week during the annual meeting of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology.
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