Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRefinery
IN THE NEWS

Refinery

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1989 | HUGO MARTIN, Times Staff Writer
Attorneys for the Mobil Oil Corp. refinery this week asked a Los Angeles Superior Court to dismiss a lawsuit by the city of Torrance that seeks to have the refinery declared a public nuisance. In a double-barreled response to the city's suit, the oil company said the court should reject Torrance's suit because the city lacks the facts to show that the refinery is unsafe, and it filed a cross-complaint asking the court to declare that the refinery "poses no unacceptable risk to the community."
Advertisement
NATIONAL
February 19, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Thunderous explosions rocked an oil refinery in Big Spring, injuring four workers and shaking buildings miles away. The blast at Alon USA Energy Inc. sent black smoke billowing and forced the closure of schools and an interstate. Fires caused by the blast were under control but still burning in the afternoon. The company was waiting for access to the site to investigate the cause of the explosion. The refinery was shut down. One employee was hospitalized for burns, and the others were treated and released, said company spokesman Blake Lewis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A man who threatened to blow up a Chevron refinery unless he was paid a disability settlement was sentenced Friday to nearly four years in prison. Ronald Denton, 39, of Torrance, was given a 46-month term by a federal judge for interfering with interstate commerce by extortion and threatening to use a weapon of mass destruction. He also was fined $10,000. Denton worked at the El Segundo refinery for 14 years.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - California safety officials ordered Chevron Corp. to pay a record-high fine of nearly $1 million for safety violations that led to a massive fire last summer at a refinery in the San Francisco Bay Area. After the Aug. 6 explosion at Chevron's facility in Richmond, Calif., an emergency telephone network advised tens of thousands of people in that city to stay indoors behind closed doors and windows to avoid breathing potentially dangerous sulfuric acid and nitrogen dioxide fumes.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1985 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Chevron Corp. said Thursday that it might sell its Philadephia refinery and 4,000 gas stations in 12 Eastern states to help reduce its huge $14.1-billion debt. A spokesman for the San Francisco-based oil company said that it is circulating an information package among potential buyers but that a formal decision to sell the Northeastern refining and marketing assets hasn't been made.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1989 | GEORGE STEIN and JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writers
Shell Oil's refinery in Carson, whose chemical emissions were cited in a federal report as posing one of the nation's worst cancer risks, stopped using the carcinogenic chemical responsible more than a year ago, a senior refinery official said. "We discontinued the use of that over a year ago," Shell refinery manager Ron Swofford said Friday. Meanwhile, officials at a second Los Angeles County facility cited in the same U.S. Environmental Protection Agency report denied Friday that the plant's emissions pose a toxic threat.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2010 | By Ronald D. White
Flying J Inc. has agreed to sell its 66,000-barrel-a-day Bakersfield refinery to Paramount Petroleum Corp., a division of Alon USA Energy Inc., if that firm is the successful bidder in an upcoming bankruptcy auction. Flying J, based in Ogden, Utah, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in December 2008 after oil prices tumbled from record-high levels and credit markets dried up. Since then, the refinery operated by subsidiary Big West of California has struggled to keep operating and to maintain a regular supply of crude for processing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1989 | GEORGE STEIN and JESSE KATZ, Times Staff Writers
Shell Oil's refinery in Carson, whose chemical emissions were cited in a federal report as posing one of the nation's worst cancer risks, has stopped using the carcinogenic chemical responsible, a senior refinery official said. "We discontinued the use of that over a year ago," Shell refinery manager Ron Swofford said Friday. Meanwhile, officials at a second Los Angeles County facility cited in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency report denied Friday that the plant's emissions pose a toxic threat.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2008 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The ragged oil refinery in a barren corner of Anbar province looks more like something out of a post-apocalyptic Mel Gibson movie than the centerpiece of an ambitious energy project. The plant, known as K-3, was built by the British in the 1930s, allowed to slip into disrepair for three decades under Saddam Hussein, then bombed by the Americans in 1991 and 2003. Now repairing the refinery and increasing its capacity could be the easy part. The more difficult job, according to U.S.-led coalition forces, is getting the layers of the Iraqi government to cooperate.
OPINION
August 14, 2012 | Antonia Juhasz, Antonia Juhasz is the author of several books on the oil industry, including "The Tyranny of Oil." She is also the editor and lead author of three Alternative Annual Reports on Chevron and the former director of the Chevron Program at San Francisco-based Global Exchange
Stay inside, close your windows and doors, and turn off air conditioning and heating units. Pets and all children in sporting activities should be brought inside, and have duct tape ready should you need to further seal windows and doors. These are among the "shelter in place" warnings made to Bay Area residents last week in response to a massive fire at the Chevron Corp. refinery in Richmond. The fire burned out of control for more than five hours, sending a giant black cloud of toxic chemicals, including sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide, thousands of feet into the air and out across the bay. While automated calls went to more than 18,000 people, some 160,000 residents live in the areas directly affected by the warning.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|