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Reflux

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NEWS
February 15, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Heartburn -- or gastrointestinal reflux disease -- is annoying, increases the risk of more serious esophageal illness and, researchers now say, impairs your voice. The study, published in the current issue of the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology , adds to the growing body of knowledge about GERD, which is produced by acid and liquids in the stomach regurgitating back up into the esophagus. GERD causes coughing, hoarseness and asthma. In addition, GERD patients also often complain of voice changes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
October 20, 2013 | By Michael P. Jones
I am a gastroenterologist. I research, diagnose and treat digestive disorders. Those disorders include heartburn, also known as acid reflux or, if you really want to scare the customers, gastroesophageal reflux disease. I am also a heartburn sufferer. Sometimes. I used to be a pretty frequent heartburn sufferer. A few years ago, when I was intent on being a "gastroenterologist's gastroenterologist," I was seeing lots of patients, competing for funding to do research and writing and presenting papers.
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NEWS
May 17, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Both laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery and proton pump inhibitors such as Nexium provide long-term control of gastroesophageal reflux disease, commonly known as GERD, French researchers reported Tuesday. With either approach, at least 85% of patients achieved long-term relief of symptoms, the team reported in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. GERD is caused by the reflux or bubbling up of stomach acids into the esophagus, producing intense pain. Inflammation of the esophagus caused by the acid can eventually lead to cancer in some cases.
HEALTH
September 14, 2013
Symptoms of reflux, such as heartburn, hoarseness, chronic cough or the feeling of a lump in your throat, should be evaluated by a doctor, says Dr. Peter Belafsky, medical director of the Voice and Swallowing Center at UC Davis: "If the exam is normal … the first line of treatment for this should be diet modification, exercise, weight loss. You can do a lot to help yourself. " In "Dropping Acid: The Reflux Diet Cookbook and Cure," by Dr. Jamie Koufman and Dr. Jordan Stern with French master chef Marc Bauer, 10 foods are cited as typically bad for most people with reflux: Chocolate Soft drinks (including diet soda)
OPINION
October 20, 2013 | By Michael P. Jones
I am a gastroenterologist. I research, diagnose and treat digestive disorders. Those disorders include heartburn, also known as acid reflux or, if you really want to scare the customers, gastroesophageal reflux disease. I am also a heartburn sufferer. Sometimes. I used to be a pretty frequent heartburn sufferer. A few years ago, when I was intent on being a "gastroenterologist's gastroenterologist," I was seeing lots of patients, competing for funding to do research and writing and presenting papers.
HEALTH
October 30, 2006
Re "Purification, or Just a Purge?" [Oct. 23]: My own experience with detox centers was life-changing. Ten days after I left, I had a blood test and my doctor was amazed at the change. He encouraged me to continue the program and asked me for all the details. I no longer take prescription drugs for hypertension, high cholesterol, esophageal reflux or irregularity. I dropped approximately 15 pounds. My doctor said I am absorbing nutrients better. My family, friends and neighbors have all noted the difference in my health and physical appearance.
HEALTH
September 1, 2012 | Karen Ravn
Pillows. They're not just for nestling your noggin anymore. They're also for keeping your stiff neck from aching, your sinuses from congesting, your acids from refluxing, your snores from snorting, your tinnitus from tintinnabulating and -- yes! glory be! -- your face from turning into a prune. Or, so go some of the claims. Here's a heads-up on how well the hype holds up. -- Pressure points Laying your head on a bunch of pointy spikes may not sound especially therapeutic.
NATIONAL
October 18, 2005 | From Reuters
A type of surgery to treat acid reflux disease, a chronic cause of heartburn, is showing a high degree of long-term success, according to a study published Monday. Of 1,340 people who underwent a laparoscopic procedure, in which a small tube is inserted into the abdomen, 93% said they were satisfied with the long-term results. Patients in the study, conducted at University Hospital in Angers, France, were followed on average for more than seven years after the surgery.
HEALTH
October 6, 2008 | Tammy Worth, Special to The Times
It WAS 1972 when a visibly uncomfortable man leaned over the side of his bed bemoaning his indulgence with the phrase, "I can't believe I ate the whole thing." This Alka-Seltzer commercial was an early and memorable marketing effort to show how a simple pill could ease the pain of gluttons everywhere. And it was just a hint of what was to come. More than 35 years of plop, plops and fizz, fizzes later, Americans have hardly learned their lesson.
HEALTH
February 1, 1999 | BARBARA J. CHUCK
Is this your life? * You have to clear your throat frequently. * You have trouble swallowing. * You have a sore throat often. * You have a chronic sour taste in your mouth. If you experience one or more of these symptoms, you might have gastroesophageal reflux disease, or acid reflux. The condition is annoying, yes, but not life-threatening. There are a number of things you can do to ease the symptoms, but understanding the problem comes first.
HEALTH
September 14, 2013 | Emily Dwass
Is what we eat eating away at us? Millions of Americans have reflux disease, with symptoms ranging from annoying to dangerous, and experts believe our diet is a major factor. Reflux is partly a matter of stomach acid moving upward to where it doesn't belong. But a leading researcher, Dr. Jamie Koufman, says an even bigger threat is the digestive enzyme pepsin, which lingers in the esophagus and throat where it is activated by acidic foods and beverages. She preaches that we need to change what, how and when we eat. Koufman, the director of the Voice Institute of New York, says many people have no idea that reflux is behind their health problems.
HEALTH
September 1, 2012 | Karen Ravn
Pillows. They're not just for nestling your noggin anymore. They're also for keeping your stiff neck from aching, your sinuses from congesting, your acids from refluxing, your snores from snorting, your tinnitus from tintinnabulating and -- yes! glory be! -- your face from turning into a prune. Or, so go some of the claims. Here's a heads-up on how well the hype holds up. -- Pressure points Laying your head on a bunch of pointy spikes may not sound especially therapeutic.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Heartburn -- or gastrointestinal reflux disease -- is annoying, increases the risk of more serious esophageal illness and, researchers now say, impairs your voice. The study, published in the current issue of the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology , adds to the growing body of knowledge about GERD, which is produced by acid and liquids in the stomach regurgitating back up into the esophagus. GERD causes coughing, hoarseness and asthma. In addition, GERD patients also often complain of voice changes.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
A welter of medications sold over the counter and by prescription can spell fast relief from the churning discomfort of acid reflux and heartburn, and the class of drugs known as proton-pump inhibitors has grown powerfully popular with Americans. But the watchdog group Public Citizen on Tuesday asked the U.S. Food & Drug Administration to warn Americans that these drugs can be habit-forming and carry a wide range of other dangers. Public Citizen complained that medications known by such commercial names as Nexium, Prilosec, Zegerid and Prevacid are widely overprescribed and used routinely by people who don't need them.
NEWS
May 17, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Both laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery and proton pump inhibitors such as Nexium provide long-term control of gastroesophageal reflux disease, commonly known as GERD, French researchers reported Tuesday. With either approach, at least 85% of patients achieved long-term relief of symptoms, the team reported in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. GERD is caused by the reflux or bubbling up of stomach acids into the esophagus, producing intense pain. Inflammation of the esophagus caused by the acid can eventually lead to cancer in some cases.
HEALTH
August 17, 2009 | Shari Roan
Obesity contributes to many health problems, such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure and diabetes. However, one condition -- gastroesophageal reflux disease -- stands out in its ties to obesity, say the authors of a new study. In the largest and most scientifically rigorous study to date, researchers at the University of Southern California were able to calculate that the effect of obesity on GERD is 13%. "Everyone knows that blood pressure and cholesterol levels are related to obesity, but the strength of the relationship with GERD is every bit as strong or perhaps even stronger," the authors of the study, Dr. Shahin Ayazi and Dr. Peter Crookes, told The Times.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
A welter of medications sold over the counter and by prescription can spell fast relief from the churning discomfort of acid reflux and heartburn, and the class of drugs known as proton-pump inhibitors has grown powerfully popular with Americans. But the watchdog group Public Citizen on Tuesday asked the U.S. Food & Drug Administration to warn Americans that these drugs can be habit-forming and carry a wide range of other dangers. Public Citizen complained that medications known by such commercial names as Nexium, Prilosec, Zegerid and Prevacid are widely overprescribed and used routinely by people who don't need them.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2005 | From Associated Press
Boston Scientific Corp. has suspended sales of a treatment for acid reflux disease after more than two dozen reports of problems. The company said that it considered its Enteryx injection kit safe but that some patients had been harmed because doctors administered it incorrectly. About 3,800 patients have been treated with Enteryx, which was approved in 2003 by the Food and Drug Administration. The treatment is a liquid polymer injected directly into the walls of the esophagus.
HEALTH
July 20, 2009 | Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon
My doctor just prescribed Prevacid for acid reflux. I am reluctant to take this medicine because I have heard it might lead to weakened bones. I already have severe osteoporosis because of a lengthy course of cortisone. This drug caused significant bone loss, so I am now taking Fosamax. I would hate to undo the benefits I have gotten on Fosamax, but the drug does cause bad heartburn. I feel caught in a dilemma. A surprising number of medicines have a negative effect on bone density.
HEALTH
October 6, 2008 | Tammy Worth, Special to The Times
It WAS 1972 when a visibly uncomfortable man leaned over the side of his bed bemoaning his indulgence with the phrase, "I can't believe I ate the whole thing." This Alka-Seltzer commercial was an early and memorable marketing effort to show how a simple pill could ease the pain of gluttons everywhere. And it was just a hint of what was to come. More than 35 years of plop, plops and fizz, fizzes later, Americans have hardly learned their lesson.
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