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Reforestation

NEWS
November 17, 1993 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County supervisors blasted Laguna Beach Mayor Lida Lenney and the Coastal Greenbelt Authority on Tuesday for supporting a plan to allow natural regrowth on burned-out hillsides of the Laguna Coast Wilderness Park rather than proposals for reseeding damaged areas. "I think it's an extremist position to take, especially in light of the damage that the rains caused there last week," Board of Supervisors Chairman Harriett M.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1993 | LESLIE BERKMAN
Sunshine gave a boost Tuesday to the kickoff of efforts to reseed fire-scorched hillsides in Laguna Beach. "It is nice and dry and the sun is shining, which is good for the native plants," said Michael Harding, an erosion control specialist for Woodward-Clyde, a Santa Ana company hired as the city's consultant. Light rain Monday night, he said, added just the right amount of moisture to help new seeds take hold.
NEWS
November 12, 1993 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The destructive mudslides Thursday are unlikely to hamper reseeding of the hillsides and open areas denuded by the recent fires, a soil erosion expert said. "The mudslides are definitely not a setback," said Michael Harding, an expert in erosion and sediment control at Woodward-Clyde, the company hired by the city. But he said "aggressive measures" must be taken to protect the reseeding effort from being wiped out later in the rainy season.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1988
Slopes of the Santa Susana Mountains charred by a fire above Granada Hills and Porter Ranch last week will not be seeded with soil-holding rye grass because more than enough natural seed survived the blaze, Los Angeles County authorities said Friday. Although the area faces the threat of erosion and mudslides if heavy rains occur before the natural grass grows back, authorities believe that drainage systems in nearby developed areas will be able to handle the runoff.
NEWS
October 13, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
For most of the last 2,000 years, and perhaps for as long as 11,000 years, American Indians have used fire to shape North America's forests. In the winter, they burned forests high in the mountains to drive elk and deer to lower elevations where they could be hunted. They burned forests and brush around their villages to keep enemies from hiding there and to prevent enemies from burning the villages down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1993 | RICHARD CORE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a steep, blackened slope above the El Morro Beach Mobile Home Park, Don Berryman dug a six-inch hole with his garden shovel Wednesday and delicately placed in a spindly, coastal sagebrush seedling. * Helped by his wife, Vicky, and daughter, Kimberly, he packed soil around the young plant's base, soaked its roots with a cup of water and paused momentarily to assess his work. "We haven't a clue what we're doing," Berryman said, smiling. "We just listened attentively to the instructions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1994
Farmers and ranchers whose land was burned during the October fires may apply for reseeding grants from the Department of Agriculture. The goal of the grant program is to reseed barren hillsides before heavy rains cause erosion and possible mudslides, officials said. Owners of farms and ranches can receive as much as $3,500 from the federal government to pay for planting grass and trees on the burned land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1993 | ANNA CEKOLA
The firestorm that struck the city in October may have brought destruction, but out of the ashes has come a one-of-a-kind learning experience for a group of sixth-grade science students at Thurston Middle School. In a class project that teachers John Wilkerson and Carrie Leventhal hope they never have to repeat, a reseeding laboratory has been created on a charred hillside near a classroom wing that was destroyed by fire at the school.
NEWS
May 20, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
When Hurricane Hugo ripped through this tropical rain forest last September, much of its flora and fauna perished. But the storm set the stage for some surprising reincarnations. "Plants and trees we haven't seen for years are suddenly shooting up," said Aeril Lugo, 47, director of the U.S. Forest Service's Institute of Tropical Forestry here. With winds as high as 212 m.p.h.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1994 | FRANK MANNING
Jacqueline Zajdman was stooped over, her forehead crinkled in concentration, her fingers moving deftly as she busied herself at her task. She was one of 55 sixth-graders from Medea Creek Middle School in Oak Park who planted oak trees at Ahmanson Ranch last week as part of a program to replace trees cut down to make way for a more than 3,000-home development. "We are doing this for the community," Jacqueline said. "We want to keep it beautiful here."
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