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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1993 | ANNA CEKOLA
The Saddleback Valley Unified School District will hold a special presentation tonight about a state and federal educational reform movement known as restructuring, the subject of much debate recently in the district. School board members called for the public forum last month when comments made about restructuring by school board member Debbie Hughes at a church meeting caused an uproar among teachers and parents.
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NEWS
April 16, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Real Democrats don't back school reform, apparently. Or maybe the message is that Democrats don't let Democrats shake up the school scene. In any case, real Democrats clearly aren't allowed to disagree with the California Teachers Assn. It's more than a little disturbing to read that the California Democratic Party voted to condemn groups that lobby for major change in the schools, such as Democrats for Education Reform, and called them fronts for Republicans. I'm a frequent critic of what I see as excesses of the reform movement - its failure to demand as much of charter schools as it does of public schools, or to keep them from “counseling out” students who don't make their numbers look good.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1992
As Americans prepare to go to the polls to exercise the most precious of their democratic freedoms, the future of Russia's fragile experiment with democracy is again overshadowed by uncertainties. President Boris N. Yeltsin has moved to outlaw the newly created National Salvation Front, a hybrid organization composed of Communist die-hards, former military officers and nationalists, including some from the most extreme margins of Russian political life.
OPINION
December 23, 2012
In yet another tussle between the teachers union and the school reform movement, the Los Angeles Unified school board decreed last week that district administrators must obtain board approval before applying for any grants of more than $1 million, in order to ensure that they don't seek out grants that come with problematic strings. The idea is reasonable enough, but the way the new policy is written, it unnecessarily ties the hands of staff without necessarily protecting the district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1993 | ANDREA HEIMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the wake of recent allegations of sexual misconduct within the rabbinate, members of the Jewish community are mobilizing efforts to address the problem and determine the appropriate course of investigation and healing. Incidents have been reported in all three branches of Judaism over the years, but so far only the Reform movement has directly addressed the issue.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As tanks and armored personnel carriers closed in on the Russian Parliament late Tuesday night, 16-year-old Misha Podnakov was among thousands of young people standing arm-in-arm, ready to sacrifice their lives to resist dictatorship. "We thought there would be a storm any minute," Podnakov said, remembering the emotion at the barricades as portable radios brought the news to the protesters that soldiers had been ordered to attack the Parliament. "There was incredible tension in the air.
WORLD
August 26, 2009 | Borzou Daragahi
Hard-line supporters of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad employed the nation's judiciary against two major moderate political parties in their boldest attempt to excise Iran's reform movement from the political scene. The prosecution at the fourth session of an extraordinary legal proceeding, derided by international and domestic legal experts as a "show trial," put a severely disabled reformist leader on trial and urged the judge to outlaw the Islamic Iran Participation Front and the Islamic Revolution Mujahedin Organization, two pillars of the reform movement that took control of the country's presidency and parliament during a liberal era that began in the late 1990s and ended earlier this decade.
NEWS
June 8, 2001 | MICHAEL SLACKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First the secret police searched Ahmad Sadr Hajsaid Javadi's house for evidence that he was plotting to overthrow the Iranian regime. Then they interrogated him for three days before reluctantly letting him go. That was 36 years ago, when the shah was still in power and Javadi, a lawyer, was a member of an underground group promoting democracy. Today he's 84 and right back where he started. A few weeks ago, his home was searched and he was arrested and charged with subversion.
WORLD
October 16, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Police arrested up to 150 people for staging a rare public protest in Riyadh, the capital, to call for reforms in the conservative Islamic kingdom, said the interior minister, Prince Nayef ibn Abdulaziz. Occurring in a country where protests are illegal, Tuesday's demonstrations were a major departure from the polite newspaper commentaries or petitions to the government that have characterized the Saudi reform movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1993
In response to your editorial, "It Just May Not Make the Grade" (Sept. 10), referring to the new LAUSD report card: It is important for the public to know that the revised grading system is a part of the total reform movement in California elementary public schools. This reform movement is documented in the California State Department of Education 1992 publication, "It's Elementary." In its series of recommendations there is one in particular that addresses the grading system, with a recommendation to "not assign letter grades during the primary years."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2011 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Wayne Pacelle, the president and chief executive of the Humane Society of the United States, discusses his call for a new humane economy in his book, "The Bond: Our Kinship with Animals, Our Call to Defend Them," being published April 5. You wrote that 35 years ago, there were only 65 million pets in this country. Now there are nearly triple that at 170 million dogs and cats, but there are only 50% more humans. What accounts for that? Americans have a love affair with dogs and cats, and they're becoming part of the fabric of our culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2010 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
As Gov.-elect Jerry Brown prepares to take office, major headwinds are buffeting the biggest component of his upcoming budget: California's schools. They are being confronted by a lack of funding that threatens to further harm pupils and a controversial reform movement that could dramatically reshape how classrooms are run. Most immediate and pressing is the state's fiscal crisis ? a $28-billion gap is forecast for the next 18 months. How that will affect school districts already reeling from years of multibillion-dollar cuts will be the subject of Brown's second budget forum, which is scheduled for Tuesday in Los Angeles.
OPINION
January 6, 2010 | By Robin Wright
Iran's so-called green movement is not yet a counterrevolution, but recent developments make clear it is heading in that direction. Seven months after the uprising began, an opposition manifesto is finally taking shape, and its sweeping demands would change the face of Iran. Three bold statements calling for reform have been issued since Friday, one by opposition presidential candidate Mir-Hossein Mousavi, one by a group of exiled religious intellectuals and the third by university professors.
WORLD
December 17, 2009 | By Ramin Mostaghim
Iranian authorities confronted their international and domestic rivals Wednesday, angering the West by testing a high-speed missile and raising political tensions at home by warning reformist opposition leaders they could be arrested. Brig. Gen. Ahmad Vahidi, Iran's defense minister, lauded the latest test-firing of the Sejil-2 surface-to-surface missile, which was broadcast on television in Iran. He praised the upgraded version of the missile for "its remarkable speed in entering the atmosphere, its strong impact and its radar-evading covers," and for its quick blastoff time, state television reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Ted Sizer, a former prep school headmaster and Harvard University dean who built an education reform movement that has endured for two decades despite its unfashionable opposition to government- imposed standards and emphasis on deep learning over memorization and regurgitation, has died. He was 77. Sizer died Wednesday at his home in Harvard, Mass., after a long battle with cancer, according to a statement by the Coalition of Essential Schools, the organization of 600 private and public schools he founded at Brown University in 1984 with the goal of restructuring the American high school.
WORLD
August 26, 2009 | Borzou Daragahi
Hard-line supporters of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad employed the nation's judiciary against two major moderate political parties in their boldest attempt to excise Iran's reform movement from the political scene. The prosecution at the fourth session of an extraordinary legal proceeding, derided by international and domestic legal experts as a "show trial," put a severely disabled reformist leader on trial and urged the judge to outlaw the Islamic Iran Participation Front and the Islamic Revolution Mujahedin Organization, two pillars of the reform movement that took control of the country's presidency and parliament during a liberal era that began in the late 1990s and ended earlier this decade.
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of the Soviet Union's brightest minds and boldest doers--the men who conceived perestroika six years ago to pull their country out of its stagnation, only to see it lose momentum under the weight of the Communist Party--are going to try again. But this time they are launching a new political movement, independent of the Communist Party, to make their vision of a new Soviet Union a reality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1995 | From Religion News Service
Reform Jewish leaders have selected a self-described "baby boomer" to head North America's largest Jewish denomination as it struggles to balance a commitment to liberal social action with growing calls for more traditional religious expression. Meeting in Philadelphia last weekend, trustees of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, the Reform movement's congregational umbrella, voted to confirm its search committee's selection of Rabbi Eric Yoffie, 47, of Westfield, N.J., as president.
WORLD
October 16, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Police arrested up to 150 people for staging a rare public protest in Riyadh, the capital, to call for reforms in the conservative Islamic kingdom, said the interior minister, Prince Nayef ibn Abdulaziz. Occurring in a country where protests are illegal, Tuesday's demonstrations were a major departure from the polite newspaper commentaries or petitions to the government that have characterized the Saudi reform movement.
OPINION
September 19, 2002
In the early part of the last century, civic reformers John Randolph Haynes and Dora Haynes championed nonpartisan local elections, citizen boards and commissions and other practices--innovative for their time--that Los Angeles still uses today. They also established a foundation to carry on the cause of good government. Fittingly, the 76-year-old Haynes Foundation is sponsoring a conference today and Friday at USC on how best to run this now booming city in a new century.
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