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Reform Party United States

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July 13, 1996 | Associated Press
Despite a lack of money or name recognition, former Colorado Gov. Richard D. Lamm predicted Friday that he has a 50-50 chance to win the Reform Party nomination over founder Ross Perot. In an interview on CNN's "Crossfire," Lamm also said he would not accept the party's vice presidential nomination and, if he were nominated, would not offer the second spot to Perot. "That's not meant to be a cut to him. I just don't think Ross Perot or Dick Lamm are No. 2 people," Lamm said.
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NEWS
February 20, 2000 | TOM COHEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They have the same name, and both want to reconfigure the political order. But Canada's Reform Party rejects any association with the U.S. version of Pat Buchanan, Jesse Ventura and Donald Trump. At one point, the Canadians even thought about suing the Americans for copying the Reform Party name. Lack of jurisdiction quashed the idea, but concern lingers that the "three-ring circus" south of the border will confuse Canadian voters, says Jason Kenney, a Reform Party member in Parliament.
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NEWS
February 20, 2000 | TOM COHEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They have the same name, and both want to reconfigure the political order. But Canada's Reform Party rejects any association with the U.S. version of Pat Buchanan, Jesse Ventura and Donald Trump. At one point, the Canadians even thought about suing the Americans for copying the Reform Party name. Lack of jurisdiction quashed the idea, but concern lingers that the "three-ring circus" south of the border will confuse Canadian voters, says Jason Kenney, a Reform Party member in Parliament.
NEWS
July 13, 1996 | Associated Press
Despite a lack of money or name recognition, former Colorado Gov. Richard D. Lamm predicted Friday that he has a 50-50 chance to win the Reform Party nomination over founder Ross Perot. In an interview on CNN's "Crossfire," Lamm also said he would not accept the party's vice presidential nomination and, if he were nominated, would not offer the second spot to Perot. "That's not meant to be a cut to him. I just don't think Ross Perot or Dick Lamm are No. 2 people," Lamm said.
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