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NATIONAL
January 28, 2014 | By David Zucchino
For decades, relatives of some boys dispatched to the notorious Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys have struggled to find out what became of them after they went missing amid reports of beatings, torture and sexual assaults at the reform school in Marianna, Fla. On Tuesday, researchers and forensic anthropologists moved a step closer to providing answers. The remains of 55 people have been uncovered on school grounds, University of South Florida researchers announced - five more than previous field work had indicated and 24 more than listed in school records.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
January 28, 2014 | By David Zucchino
For decades, relatives of some boys dispatched to the notorious Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys have struggled to find out what became of them after they went missing amid reports of beatings, torture and sexual assaults at the reform school in Marianna, Fla. On Tuesday, researchers and forensic anthropologists moved a step closer to providing answers. The remains of 55 people have been uncovered on school grounds, University of South Florida researchers announced - five more than previous field work had indicated and 24 more than listed in school records.
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NATIONAL
October 26, 2013 | By David Zucchino
With each scrape of the Florida Panhandle soil by an excavator's metal claw, anthropologists are moving a step closer to unraveling a century of mystery over the fates of missing boys from an infamous reform school. Some of those sent to the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys as "incorrigible" never returned. Those who survived have described decades of beatings, rapes - and possible murders - at the school in Marianna, Fla., from 1900 until it was shut down in 2011. A team of anthropologists is carefully digging on the school grounds in search of boys buried in unmarked graves.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
Los Angeles illustrator Kim Baise, who works under the name Jikits, said she created playful papier-mâché mobiles "to represent the side of me that enjoys being trapped in my own inner world. " Her work is reminiscent of Mexican folk art. The eloquent objects are made from newspaper, flour, hemp twine and water-based soy paints. Her most popular mobiles at the Silver Lake shop ReForm School (where we spotted them) are her single-strand mobiles made with five potted succulents.
SPORTS
February 18, 1989
Are they running an athletic program at the University of Oklahoma or a reform school? In recent weeks, five Sooner football players have been arrested for such crimes as rape, selling of cocaine and shooting with intent to injure. I'd say they are more than ready for the professional draft--of organized crime, that is, not the NFL. KENNETH L. ZIMMERMAN Cypress
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1986 | Pat H. Broeske
"When I was growing up, I didn't go to bed dreaming about Doris Day and Debbie Reynolds. I dreamed about Jennifer Jones and Rita Hayworth. There was just something about those 'bad girls.' " Obviously, Tom DeSimone still has a thing for bad girls. Why else would he have written/directed "Reform School Girls" for New World? It's the one out now with Wendy O.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1991 | NANCY RAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"You must realize that this is very hard for us to admit, that we had failed with our daughter. We owe our daughter's life to Brother Palmer. God bless him, he gave us back our daughter. We are a family again." Those words from a stocky, sun-tanned father whose tear-stained face reflected the emotional trauma he had just described are in sharp contrast to the angry words of a former student at Victory Christian Academy. Said Blackbird Willow, the former student: "Student?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1986 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Don't let the cartoonlike ads for "Reform School Girls" (citywide) fool you. The movie has been billed as an outlandish sendup of the women-behind-bars genre, but that's just wishful thinking--or part of the movie's cynical hype. "Girls" is far too feeble to qualify as a raunchy prison parody. It's more of a brainless homage, in the clunky way that "Rambo" and "Missing in Action" paid tribute to "The Green Berets."
NEWS
August 22, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
Police arrested 16 teen-agers today on charges of killing 37 fellow residents of a South Korean girls reform school by setting it on fire, a police spokesman said. "We arrested [them] on charges of arson and homicide," he said. Police said the young women set the fires in a bid to escape when guards unlocked the doors. The early morning fires swept out of control before the doors were opened to let firefighters in.
NEWS
March 4, 1988 | United Press International
Argo, 12, was once considered an incorrigible delinquent who smashed houses, flattened villages and trampled crops. Now he has turned over a new leaf and is the pride of a reform school for wayward elephants. "He has a whole new life," said trainer Didik, 19, who suffered a dislocated ankle and numerous bruises while civilizing the unruly pachyderm. Argo now performs tricks and gives rides to children.
NEWS
November 19, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
Like so many handmade designs, Bari Ziperstein's stoneware coasters are distinctive in their size, color and shape. The Glassell Park artist said she is inspired by Finnish patterns and the California desert in creating her Bzippy & Co. collection, which includes jewelry, brutalist vases and bowls, bud vases and pyramid lamps. The heavy stoneware coasters are hand-painted circles or hexagons, easily stacked on a table. A set of four is $45. They're available at Individual Melody in Los Angeles, ReForm School in Silver Lake, Fifth Floor in Chinatown, Platform in Highland Park, the Orange County Museum of Art Museum Shop in Newport Beach and BKB Ceramics   in Joshua Tree.
NATIONAL
October 26, 2013 | By David Zucchino
With each scrape of the Florida Panhandle soil by an excavator's metal claw, anthropologists are moving a step closer to unraveling a century of mystery over the fates of missing boys from an infamous reform school. Some of those sent to the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys as "incorrigible" never returned. Those who survived have described decades of beatings, rapes - and possible murders - at the school in Marianna, Fla., from 1900 until it was shut down in 2011. A team of anthropologists is carefully digging on the school grounds in search of boys buried in unmarked graves.
OPINION
October 1, 2013 | By Diane Ravitch
Los Angeles has more charter schools than any other school district in the nation, and it's a very bad idea. Billionaires like privately managed schools. Parents are lured with glittering promises of getting their kids a sure ticket to college. Politicians want to appear to be champions of "school reform" with charters. But charters will not end the poverty at the root of low academic performance or transform our nation's schools into a high-performing system. The world's top-performing systems - Finland and Korea, for example - do not have charter schools.
NATIONAL
September 1, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton
The first of many to die at a Florida reform school infamous for inflicting beatings and abuse is identified in official records only as “Unknown colored boy.” Researchers say he died in 1911. But his name, final resting place, and the reason for his early death remain a mystery. He's not alone. The whereabouts of nearly two dozen others who died at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys are also unknown, researchers said. Those who once stayed at the reform school -- and were subjected to regular lashings by school officials -- say many more could be buried on the property of the now-shuttered state-run school, located in Marianna, a small town in Florida's panhandle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Advocates aiming to reform school discipline policies hailed Gov. Jerry Brown on Friday for signing four bills they say will help reduce the number of California students suspended each year. After years of community pressure, the movement to reduce suspensions has gained statewide momentum after several studies documented the large number of students affected, the disproportionate impact on African Americans and the correlation between suspensions and dropouts. Laura Faer of Public Counsel Law Center, a Los Angeles pro bono law firm, praised Brown's actions as an "important step forward" that would help keep countless students in school and on track to graduate.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2012
Rachel Renee Russell is the bestselling author of the "Dork Diaries" series, which will continue in October with book No. 5, "Tales From a Not-So-Smart Miss Know-It-All. " We asked the lawyer-turned-writer what she's been reading. Her answer: "Merits of Mischief Book One: The Bad Apple," by T.R. Burns. Here's Russell's review: "Quiet and shy Seamus Hinkle is a normal 12-year-old just trying to survive middle school - until the unfortunate apple incident with his substitute teacher in the lunchroom.
SPORTS
November 14, 1996 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In short bursts of rhythm and rote during an afternoon class shift, boys in red shirts perform about-face pirouettes and march past boys in yellow shirts. All commands are obeyed. All eyes are fixed. All haircuts are military. It is a brilliant November day, the desert awash in long shadows, as the minivan crunches along a gravel road during inspection of the 188-acre Arizona Boys Ranch. The driver's side window is half-open as the vehicle passes two students on their way to class. "Hello, Sir!"
BUSINESS
January 10, 1994 | ALEX DOMINGUEZ, ASSOCIATED PRESS
After proving that a reform school kid can become a millionaire, James Hindman wants to show juvenile delinquents they can be successful and that he can make a profit setting them straight. The 58-year-old founder of Jiffy Lube has taken over one of the state of Maryland's biggest headaches, the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School, a reform school plagued by escapes, crowded conditions and attacks on employees.
NATIONAL
May 23, 2012 | By Jenny Deam and Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
AURORA, Colo. - On May 2, D'Avonte Meadows, a 6-year-old with an infectious grin and rambunctious streak, was suspended for three days from Sable Elementary in suburban Denver for crooning "[I'm] Sexy and I Know It" to a girl in lunch line. The school declared it sexual harassment and told his parents that, because D'Avonte sang the same song to the same girl before, he is a repeat offender. The news media pounced. And Stephanie Meadows, D'Avonte's 29-year-old mother, gave her bewildered son, a special needs student, a crash course in birds, bees and sexual boundaries.
OPINION
February 11, 2012 | Patt Morrison
No one, it seems, is lukewarm about Michelle Rhee; she's a pass-fail figure, inspiring or polarizing. In the name of reforming public schools, the onetime Teach for America teacher, depending on your viewpoint, either trailblazed or bulldozed her way through Washington, D.C.'s school system as its chancellor, closing schools, firing people and raising student scores -- and questions about the tactics. Now she is extending her agenda nationwide with StudentsFirst, which supports culling bad teachers, school choice for parents and tightfisted budgeting - all of which she sums up with the word "accountability.
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