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NEWS
July 6, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United Church of Christ has decided to unite with three other Protestant denominations, sharing congregations and ministers with the denominations for the first time since the 16th century. At the church's convention in Columbus, more than 700 delegates--representing 1.5 million members--voted to accept the plan for "full communion." The unification proposal, which would allow joint congregations, minister exchanges and shared sacraments, was approved earlier this year by the 2.
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NEWS
July 6, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United Church of Christ has decided to unite with three other Protestant denominations, sharing congregations and ministers with the denominations for the first time since the 16th century. At the church's convention in Columbus, more than 700 delegates--representing 1.5 million members--voted to accept the plan for "full communion." The unification proposal, which would allow joint congregations, minister exchanges and shared sacraments, was approved earlier this year by the 2.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1990 | From Times wire services
The Reformed Church in America has launched a program that calls for creation of 98 new congregations by 1998. The program, called "98 by 98," was adopted at the 200,000-member denomination's 1990 General Synod, which just met.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1990 | From Times wire services
The Reformed Church in America has launched a program that calls for creation of 98 new congregations by 1998. The program, called "98 by 98," was adopted at the 200,000-member denomination's 1990 General Synod, which just met.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1988 | Compiled from Times wire services
For the second time in two years, the Reformed Church in America has voted against bringing the denomination into full membership in the Consultation on Church Union, the nine-denomination organization that began its efforts toward church unity 24 years ago. By a vote of 154 to 101 after two hours of debate, delegates to the church's General Synod meeting in New York City rejected a recommendation to upgrade the church's "observer" status to one of full membership.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1988 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Two additional denominations have become members of the National Assn. of Evangelicals, which represents most conservative churches in the country. The new members of the Wheaton, Ill.-based organization are the 220,000-member Christian Reformed Church in North America and the 80,000-member General Assn. of Regular Baptists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1997
The decision by the Evangelical Lutheran Church to reach accord with three other Protestant churches but to reject ties with the Episcopal Church dismayed those working for such a concord, Lutherans and Episcopalians alike. Your Aug. 19 article mentioned feelings of pain, sadness and even anger. The disappointment is understandable, as people of many faiths hope for the great ecumenical day when believers come together. But there is also good news in the story; the Presbyterian Church, the United Church of Christ, the Reformed Church in America and the Evangelical Lutherans did reach a historic accord.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1987 | From Times staff and wire service reports
The Rev. Patricia A. McClurg, a Presbyterian minister, and the Very Rev. Leonid Kishkovsky, an Orthodox priest, have been nominated as president and president-elect respectively of the National Council of Churches. If the council's Governing Board, meeting Nov. 4-6 in Jacksonville, Fla., follows its usual procedure and elects the nominees for the unpaid, two-year terms, it will mark the first time that an ordained woman minister will have served as president of the 37-year-old organization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1986 | MARK I. PINSKY and JOHN DART, Times Staff Writers
The Rev. Robert Schuller, concerned that the largest opposition group in South Africa has been infiltrated by "violent elements," has blocked a speech by the group's secretary general at the television evangelist's Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove. Alfred Nzo, a leader of the African National Congress, the oldest multiracial organization opposing white rule in South Africa, had been scheduled to deliver the keynote address June 18 at the annual meeting of the Reformed Church in America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2000 | ELAINE GALE
The Rev. and Mrs. Robert H. Schuller will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary and renew their vows with their son Robert A. Schuller officiating at the 9:30 and 11 a.m. worship services Sunday at the Crystal Cathedral. The choir will sing "Because," which the Schullers featured at their wedding. After each service, wedding cake, lemonade and coffee will be served.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1988 | Compiled from Times wire services
For the second time in two years, the Reformed Church in America has voted against bringing the denomination into full membership in the Consultation on Church Union, the nine-denomination organization that began its efforts toward church unity 24 years ago. By a vote of 154 to 101 after two hours of debate, delegates to the church's General Synod meeting in New York City rejected a recommendation to upgrade the church's "observer" status to one of full membership.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2013 | By Anh Do
Crystal Cathedral Ministries' founding pastor, who propelled his church into an international religious force, has been hospitalized after falling, according to the family. The Rev. Robert H. Schuller fell in the middle of the night over the weekend while at home in Orange. He remains in an Orange County hospital where "he's doing well, recovering quickly, and of course, our prayers are with him," said Angie Schuller, his granddaughter. Schuller, 86, is undergoing tests and doctors may release him later this week.
NEWS
September 5, 2000 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The nation's two largest ecumenical organizations are positioning themselves for a radical realignment that could bring liberal and conservative churches together in common social causes and lead to the disbanding of the venerable National Council of Churches. Traditionally, churches in the United States have been divided. Old-line Protestant churches, along with Anglican, Orthodox and African American denominations, have belonged to the National Council of Churches. The National Assn.
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