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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2001 | From Associated Press
Reform Judaism's synagogue union praised President Bush's leadership since Sept. 11, while urging him to preserve civil liberties during the war on terror. The Union of American Hebrew Congregations, representing more than 900 liberal synagogues, issued the resolution at its biennial conference. The union praised Bush as a model of service and tolerance for trying to protect civilians in U.S. airstrikes and for condemning "our home-grown fundamentalists."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Alfred Gottschalk, a leader of Reform Judaism who ordained the first American woman rabbi and headed Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion for three decades, died Saturday in Cincinnati. He was 79. A Hebrew Union official said Gottschalk died from complications following an automobile accident late last year Gottschalk, who escaped the Holocaust as a child in Germany, oversaw the expansion of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, the Reform seminary and graduate school with campuses in Los Angeles, New York, Cincinnati and Jerusalem, during 25 years as president.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1985 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
Leaders of Reform Judaism, the most liberal of synagogue organizations, say they have outpaced the Conservative movement and now have a record-high 791 member congregations. They say they have been gaining new affiliates in the last three years at the rate of more than one a month. "We believe the Reform movement is already the largest denomination in American Judaism," said Rabbi Alexander M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2003 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Rabbi Janet Ross Marder, a Los Angeles native, has become the first woman president in the 114-year history of the Central Conference of American Rabbis, the rabbinical arm of Reform Judaism. Marder, 48, who served the Los Angeles Jewish community until becoming senior rabbi of a Bay Area congregation in 1999, assumed the presidency of the conference Wednesday and was to be installed tonight during the organization's annual conference, being held this year in Washington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1988 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Reform Judaism's Commission on Social Action defended the American Civil Liberties Union in a statement responding to Republican criticism of Democratic presidential candidate Michael Dukakis' membership in the organization. "We find an organization whose principles are deep in our nation's tradition and spirit being slandered as outside the mainstream of American life," said the commission in a statement issued this week.
NEWS
November 3, 1985 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
The liberal wing of American Judaism is making so few spiritual demands on its synagogue members that "we give substance to the perception that Reform Judaism is but a religion of convenience," its rabbi-president charged Saturday. Addressing the biennial national convention of Reform's Union of American Hebrew Congregations at the Century Plaza, Rabbi Alexander M. Schindler said that figures released last week showing that the union has a record-high 791 affiliated synagogues and 1.
NEWS
January 13, 1994
Six years after Pomona Rabbi Earl Kaplan huddled with a group of Soviet Jews in Zinovy Kogan's barren Moscow apartment to illicitly study the Torah, the two men finally met on U.S. soil. Much has changed over the years: The winds of perestroika pushed Kogan's congregation above ground to make him the leader of Reform Judaism in the former Soviet Union and Eastern bloc. Through those changes, Kaplan's Temple Beth Israel in Pomona has provided money, medicine and moral support.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Alfred Gottschalk, a leader of Reform Judaism who ordained the first American woman rabbi and headed Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion for three decades, died Saturday in Cincinnati. He was 79. A Hebrew Union official said Gottschalk died from complications following an automobile accident late last year Gottschalk, who escaped the Holocaust as a child in Germany, oversaw the expansion of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, the Reform seminary and graduate school with campuses in Los Angeles, New York, Cincinnati and Jerusalem, during 25 years as president.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rabbi Alexander M. Schindler, the outspoken leader of Reform Judaism who urged synagogues to embrace non-Jewish spouses and championed the ordination of gays and lesbians, died Wednesday. He was 75. Schindler suffered a heart attack at his home in Westport, Conn. For nearly a quarter-century, Schindler presided over the most liberal of Judaism's three main branches, broadening its appeal to attract unaffiliated Jews on the margins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rabbi Chaim Stern, 71, an influential liturgist of Reform Judaism whose 1978 prayer book for the High Holy Days was quoted by a repentant President Bill Clinton, died of a malignant brain tumor Nov. 5 in Miami. As editor and author of most prayer books used by the 800 congregations in the liberal American Reform movement, the rabbi translated many passages from the original Hebrew, collected wise quotes from many sources and wrote other sections himself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2001 | From Associated Press
Reform Judaism's synagogue union praised President Bush's leadership since Sept. 11, while urging him to preserve civil liberties during the war on terror. The Union of American Hebrew Congregations, representing more than 900 liberal synagogues, issued the resolution at its biennial conference. The union praised Bush as a model of service and tolerance for trying to protect civilians in U.S. airstrikes and for condemning "our home-grown fundamentalists."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rabbi Chaim Stern, 71, an influential liturgist of Reform Judaism whose 1978 prayer book for the High Holy Days was quoted by a repentant President Bill Clinton, died of a malignant brain tumor Nov. 5 in Miami. As editor and author of most prayer books used by the 800 congregations in the liberal American Reform movement, the rabbi translated many passages from the original Hebrew, collected wise quotes from many sources and wrote other sections himself.
NEWS
December 7, 2000 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
This week's suspension of Reform Judaism's central seminary leader for alleged sexual misconduct highlighted the Reform movement's crackdown on such behavior in recent years, officials said Wednesday. Rabbi Sheldon Zimmerman resigned from his post as president of the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion after the Reform rabbinate's ethics committee suspended him for two years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rabbi Alexander M. Schindler, the outspoken leader of Reform Judaism who urged synagogues to embrace non-Jewish spouses and championed the ordination of gays and lesbians, died Wednesday. He was 75. Schindler suffered a heart attack at his home in Westport, Conn. For nearly a quarter-century, Schindler presided over the most liberal of Judaism's three main branches, broadening its appeal to attract unaffiliated Jews on the margins.
NEWS
December 16, 1996 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid growing pressure on rabbis to marry Jews to non-Jews, lay leaders of Reform Judaism have voted not to challenge their rabbis' official opposition to interfaith marriage ceremonies. The Union of American Hebrew Congregations' national board of trustees took up the hot-button issue for the first time at its three-day meeting here. The board decided that the rabbis' right of conscience and authority on religious matters must be respected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1995 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
God may have cast the 10 Commandments in tablets of stone, but a religion that fails to change, so far as the nation's leading rabbi in Reform Judaism is concerned, is destined to disappear. And tumultuous change--from ordaining women to the rabbinate to affirming the equality of gays in synagogues--has been a hallmark of Rabbi Alexander M. Schindler's 22-year presidency of the Reform movement in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1995 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
God may have cast the 10 Commandments in tablets of stone, but a religion that fails to change, so far as the nation's leading rabbi in Reform Judaism is concerned, is destined to disappear. And tumultuous change--from ordaining women to the rabbinate to affirming the equality of gays in synagogues--has been a hallmark of Rabbi Alexander M. Schindler's 22-year presidency of the Reform movement in the United States.
NEWS
December 16, 1996 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid growing pressure on rabbis to marry Jews to non-Jews, lay leaders of Reform Judaism have voted not to challenge their rabbis' official opposition to interfaith marriage ceremonies. The Union of American Hebrew Congregations' national board of trustees took up the hot-button issue for the first time at its three-day meeting here. The board decided that the rabbis' right of conscience and authority on religious matters must be respected.
NEWS
January 13, 1994
Six years after Pomona Rabbi Earl Kaplan huddled with a group of Soviet Jews in Zinovy Kogan's barren Moscow apartment to illicitly study the Torah, the two men finally met on U.S. soil. Much has changed over the years: The winds of perestroika pushed Kogan's congregation above ground to make him the leader of Reform Judaism in the former Soviet Union and Eastern bloc. Through those changes, Kaplan's Temple Beth Israel in Pomona has provided money, medicine and moral support.
NEWS
June 26, 1990 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The progressive Reform branch of Judaism on Monday became the largest Judeo-Christian body to openly welcome gay and lesbian clergy as full-fledged members. Delegates to the 101st annual convention of Reform Judaism's Central Conference of American Rabbis overwhelming adopted the recommendation of a committee of rabbis even though the Bible and Jewish law says homosexual behavior is sinful.
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