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Refugee Agency

NEWS
December 22, 2001 | From Reuters
Police here said Friday that they had arrested four Iraqi Kurds and one Palestinian for questioning over possible links to Osama bin Laden's Al Qaeda network or other extremist groups. Police commander Col. Abdi Hassan Awale said the men were arrested three days ago and have been detained pending investigations. He said they appeared to have entered Somalia without permission. Somalia's transitional national government is keen to show it is cooperating in the U.S.
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NEWS
November 24, 2001 | From Reuters
The U.N. refugee agency said Friday it had reestablished its presence in the northern Afghan city of Mazar-i-Sharif--where there have been unconfirmed reports of atrocities--as well as in the capital, Kabul. "We have, as I speak now, three international staff on the ground in Kabul. We still have a very tight ceiling of 20 international U.N. staff for the city of Kabul.
NEWS
November 14, 2001 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Taliban is on the decline, and so is Iran's need to build new camps for refugees, the government's top official on Afghan issues says, in a policy shift that the United Nations fears may be premature.
NEWS
June 2, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N.'s lead refugee agency announced Friday that it will have to cut key aid programs and nearly 1,000 jobs because donor countries have failed for two years in a row to come through with funds they had pledged. Ruud Lubbers, the U.N. high commissioner for refugees, said that the "painful but absolutely necessary" cuts will be spread among programs around the world in order to minimize their impact.
NEWS
October 26, 2000 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary-General Kofi Annan on Wednesday nominated two surprise candidates to fill a pair of the U.N.'s highest-profile posts. Annan nominated former Dutch Prime Minister Ruud Lubbers to be high commissioner for refugees, and named Thoraya Ahmed Obaid, a longtime official with the world body, to head the U.N. Population Fund, which would make her the first Saudi woman to hold a top U.N. post. The General Assembly is expected to approve the appointments.
NEWS
September 8, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearing more attacks after the mob killing of three foreign aid workers, the United Nations evacuated its remaining relief staff from West Timor on Thursday, leaving about 90,000 refugees without international assistance. The Indonesian government, pledging to assert control in the troubled region, said 15 people had been arrested in Wednesday's slayings of the aid workers.
NEWS
May 18, 1999 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Returning to Kosovo seemed just around the corner to the refugees here when they first arrived in Macedonia, where the camps are barely a 10-minute drive from the mountainous border. But now, with NATO's air war on Yugoslavia ending its eighth week, thousands of refugees are clamoring to get on flights to foreign countries.
NEWS
May 13, 1999 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took just a push of a button and a few keystrokes for Lindita Kryziu to officially become a refugee. Of course, she has held that unhappy distinction since Serbs ordered her and her family from their home in the southern Kosovo village of Retimlje last month and, as a final indignity on her way to Albania, snatched her passport and national identification card. "I felt like they had taken my identity," said Kryziu, 19. "I had nothing with my name on it, nothing with my picture on it. . . .
NEWS
April 2, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A 26-year-old student forced to strip naked while soldiers taunted her. An old man shot through the head with a Kalashnikov for moving too slowly. Toddlers forced to walk for miles in their stockinged feet. Tales of horror, cruelty and depravity emerged Thursday at the Albanian border as more than 10,000 Kosovo Albanians who had been deported from their homes trudged, stumbled or rode across a red line on a bridge that marked the end of life as they had known it.
NEWS
December 8, 1997 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Life has never been more difficult for the 22 million refugees and displaced people protected by the United Nations, according to a report released today that has raised alarm about the growing inhospitality toward asylum seekers. While some countries cite threats to their internal security and a lack of resources to explain their diminished enthusiasm for hosting refugees, others are simply tired of the responsibility, aid officials say.
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