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Refugee Problem

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1989
That very famous and profound Christian philosopher/longshoreman Eric Hoffer pungently observed many years ago, "The Jews (Israel) are a peculiar people: Things permitted to other nations are forbidden to the Jews . . . Other nations drive out thousands, even millions of people and theirs is no refugee problem. . . . Everyone expects the Jews to be the only real Christians in this world." STANLEY GREENFIELD Woodland Hills
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WORLD
November 9, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
JERUSALEM - Historian Benny Morris has a knack for enraging Israelis of every political stripe. Morris' research on the 1948 war for independence challenged long-standing Zionist narratives that said Israel was not responsible for the creation of 750,000 Palestinian refugees. He infuriated right-wing Israelis by documenting secret plans to expel Arabs and accounts of massacres and rapes by Jewish forces. Then a few years ago, he turned his critical eye toward Palestinians, holding them largely responsible for stalled peace talks.
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OPINION
January 8, 2004
As a strong supporter of the state of Israel, I read with interest Shlomo Avineri's piece on the Geneva Accord, "Fatally Flawed Peace Proposal" (Opinion, Jan. 4). Avineri argues that the accord fails to resolve two issues at the heart of the conflict: Israel's right to exist and the Palestinian refugee problem. He claims that there is no explicit Palestinian acceptance of Israel as a Jewish state [in its present location]. In fact, the accord states: "The state of Palestine shall immediately recognize the state of Israel" (Article 2, Sec. 1)
OPINION
January 31, 2004
Re "In '48, Israel Did What It Had to Do," by Benny Morris, Commentary, Jan. 26: I am the son of survivors of the ethnic cleansing committed by Israel in the Galilee village of Suhmata on Oct. 29, 1948 -- a village that existed before 612, and until October 1948. On that dreadful day, at least 1,000 people (the entire population) were driven out of their homes and their homes destroyed. I am offended by the publication of Morris' commentary because I believe his ideas are very similar to the extremist Serb, Nazi or Klan aspirations to have ethnically pure "nations."
NEWS
September 2, 1994 | From Associated Press
Rwanda and Zaire pledged Thursday to help an estimated 1.2 million Hutu refugees return to their homeland in Rwanda from wretched camps in eastern Zaire, and Zaire urged that they return by the end of this month. Filippo Grandi, the field chief for the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees in Goma, said it was "a big achievement" that both countries had agreed to work together.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2001 | MUHAMMAD MUSLIH and RICHARD W. MURPHY, Muhammad Muslih is a professor of political science at Long Island University. Richard W. Murphy is a senior fellow for the Middle East at the Council on Foreign Relations
The apparent assumption on the part of American and Israeli negotiators that there can be a trade-off between some form of limited Palestinian sovereignty over parts of East Jerusalem and the right of return for about 3.5 million Palestinian refugees is invalid. The right of return, contained in U.N. General Assembly Resolution 194 of December 1948 and explicitly supported by the U.S. government until the 1992 Ottawa meeting on refugees, cannot be so easily dropped.
OPINION
March 31, 2003
Re "A Family Tested but Intact," March 27: Are you also planning a series of articles about Israeli families? Will you mention that the sufferings of the Palestinian family in the article might have been solved years ago if their leader (Yasser Arafat) had accepted a peace agreement with Israel instead of bribe money from Saddam Hussein? Remember this: In 1948, the United Nations established Israel and Palestine. The very next day all Arab nations (including Iraq) attacked Israel. This is the real beginning of the refugee problem.
OPINION
January 31, 2004
Re "In '48, Israel Did What It Had to Do," by Benny Morris, Commentary, Jan. 26: I am the son of survivors of the ethnic cleansing committed by Israel in the Galilee village of Suhmata on Oct. 29, 1948 -- a village that existed before 612, and until October 1948. On that dreadful day, at least 1,000 people (the entire population) were driven out of their homes and their homes destroyed. I am offended by the publication of Morris' commentary because I believe his ideas are very similar to the extremist Serb, Nazi or Klan aspirations to have ethnically pure "nations."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2000
Re "Palestinian Refugees Must Be Allowed to Choose," Commentary, Aug. 10: Elia Zureik failed to mention that the 800,000 Palestinians who fled their homes in 1948 could have easily been absorbed and started a new life in surrounding Arab countries. Instead, they were purposely kept in refugee camps as a political trump card. There were more than a million Jews who were expelled or constrained to leave their homes from Arab countries such as Iraq, Egypt, Syria, et al. They too had to relinquish their homes, properties, businesses, assets, etc. The difference, however, is that they did not go to refugee camps and hibernate.
NEWS
August 22, 1988 | From Reuters
Refugees fleeing tribal massacres in Burundi on Sunday gave gruesome accounts of the slaughter and suggested that thousands have been killed. The Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees said that at least 30,000 people have fled across the border into Rwanda. "Those who fled may be less numerous than those who died," survivor Antoine Mpabonimana said. She said three of her children were bayoneted to death by troops who took part in the killings.
OPINION
January 8, 2004
As a strong supporter of the state of Israel, I read with interest Shlomo Avineri's piece on the Geneva Accord, "Fatally Flawed Peace Proposal" (Opinion, Jan. 4). Avineri argues that the accord fails to resolve two issues at the heart of the conflict: Israel's right to exist and the Palestinian refugee problem. He claims that there is no explicit Palestinian acceptance of Israel as a Jewish state [in its present location]. In fact, the accord states: "The state of Palestine shall immediately recognize the state of Israel" (Article 2, Sec. 1)
OPINION
March 31, 2003
Re "A Family Tested but Intact," March 27: Are you also planning a series of articles about Israeli families? Will you mention that the sufferings of the Palestinian family in the article might have been solved years ago if their leader (Yasser Arafat) had accepted a peace agreement with Israel instead of bribe money from Saddam Hussein? Remember this: In 1948, the United Nations established Israel and Palestine. The very next day all Arab nations (including Iraq) attacked Israel. This is the real beginning of the refugee problem.
NEWS
June 2, 2002 | JOSEPH B. VERRENGIA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The United Nations estimates that 23 million refugees live in virtually medieval conditions throughout Asia, Africa and the Americas. With every civil war or natural disaster, aid groups offer the same response: an airlift of tents and sacks of grain. Western scientists and engineers watching the misery say it's time they got involved. They are offering their skills to improve living conditions and to reduce the environmental damage left by refugee camps.
OPINION
April 30, 2002
The suggestion by Michael Lerner ("Israel's Jewish Critics Aren't 'Self-Hating,'" Opinion, April 28) that he has been labeled a self-hating Jew is a red herring intended to divert attention from his distortion of the facts. Lerner states that Ehud Barak acted in bad faith during the Camp David negotiations and then reverses himself by writing that at Taba the parties were close to agreement. He neglects to add that after those negotiations Yasser Arafat started hostilities. He writes that Barak did not address the refugee issue; there was an offer of compensation with the resettlement of an agreed number of refugees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2001 | MUHAMMAD MUSLIH and RICHARD W. MURPHY, Muhammad Muslih is a professor of political science at Long Island University. Richard W. Murphy is a senior fellow for the Middle East at the Council on Foreign Relations
The apparent assumption on the part of American and Israeli negotiators that there can be a trade-off between some form of limited Palestinian sovereignty over parts of East Jerusalem and the right of return for about 3.5 million Palestinian refugees is invalid. The right of return, contained in U.N. General Assembly Resolution 194 of December 1948 and explicitly supported by the U.S. government until the 1992 Ottawa meeting on refugees, cannot be so easily dropped.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2000
Re "Palestinian Refugees Must Be Allowed to Choose," Commentary, Aug. 10: Elia Zureik failed to mention that the 800,000 Palestinians who fled their homes in 1948 could have easily been absorbed and started a new life in surrounding Arab countries. Instead, they were purposely kept in refugee camps as a political trump card. There were more than a million Jews who were expelled or constrained to leave their homes from Arab countries such as Iraq, Egypt, Syria, et al. They too had to relinquish their homes, properties, businesses, assets, etc. The difference, however, is that they did not go to refugee camps and hibernate.
NEWS
July 29, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.N. official said Tuesday that Serbian officials and militia irregulars had "blackmailed" him into shipping 7,000 Muslims out of a town in northwestern Bosnia-Herzegovina last week, setting what he called "an alarming and dangerous precedent" that could affect the 400,000 Muslims still in the area. Jean-Claude Concolato, who heads the liaison office for the U.N.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1992 | JANE GALBRAITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If the stories of battered women and AIDS sufferers can be made into compelling Hollywood dramas that propel some people to action, couldn't the same expectation be had for those involving the plight of starving children in Somalia or prisoners in Serbian-run concentration camps? That's what the Geneva-based United Nations commissioner for refugees hopes. The agency has taken the unprecedented step of asking a select number of Writers Guild of America members to travel under U.N.
NEWS
September 2, 1994 | From Associated Press
Rwanda and Zaire pledged Thursday to help an estimated 1.2 million Hutu refugees return to their homeland in Rwanda from wretched camps in eastern Zaire, and Zaire urged that they return by the end of this month. Filippo Grandi, the field chief for the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees in Goma, said it was "a big achievement" that both countries had agreed to work together.
NEWS
September 2, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cuban and American diplomats, while laying aside any obvious hostile feelings, remained far apart after the opening round of talks Thursday aimed at working out an agreement for halting the relentless waves of Cuban rafters seeking an American haven. "We still have a long way to go before having an agreement and a long way to go to solving the problem," said Ricardo Alarcon, head of the Cuban delegation. Neither side had expected to reach agreement on the first day.
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