Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRefugees Afghanistan
IN THE NEWS

Refugees Afghanistan

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 17, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Tens of thousands of Afghan refugees are continuing to flee their country despite Wednesday's final Soviet troop withdrawal, and Pakistan is bracing for yet another human wave from its western neighbor in the near future, senior Pakistani government officials said Thursday. What is worse, Pakistan's chief commissioner for Afghan refugees said, few if any of the 3.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
August 30, 2002 | CHRIS KRAUL and JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Health officials here warned Thursday that the rising tide of returning refugees poses significant health risks for a country already suffering one of the highest rates of infant and maternal mortality in the world. The influx of Afghans returning from Pakistan, Iran and other countries has severely burdened a health system taxed by war, drought and food shortages, said Dr. Abdullah Fahim, spokesman for the Health Ministry. Since March, an estimated 1.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 18, 1998 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Refugees fleeing an Afghan city recently conquered by the Taliban say that troops with the ultra-orthodox religious army slaughtered thousands of civilians when they took the town last month. The refugees, who are arriving here each day on foot from the northern Afghan city of Mazar-i-Sharif, say Taliban fighters focused exclusively on an ethnic minority known as the Hazaras, picked out by their distinctive Mongolian features.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI and TYLER MARSHAL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Seen from atop the 7,400-foot-high Khojak Pass, Afghanistan stretches out in splendid serenity--flat desert, broken mountains and the dun-colored adobe walls of scattered settlements and villages in the distance. But descend just a few miles to Chaman, the gateway from southwestern Pakistan into the land of the Taliban, and all is dust, tumult and excitement as Afghanistan braces for an expected attack from the United States, a superpower thousands of miles away but coming closer.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI and TYLER MARSHAL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Seen from atop the 7,400-foot-high Khojak Pass, Afghanistan stretches out in splendid serenity--flat desert, broken mountains and the dun-colored adobe walls of scattered settlements and villages in the distance. But descend just a few miles to Chaman, the gateway from southwestern Pakistan into the land of the Taliban, and all is dust, tumult and excitement as Afghanistan braces for an expected attack from the United States, a superpower thousands of miles away but coming closer.
NEWS
February 13, 1988 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
His name was Syed Bahauddin Majrooh, but everyone called him "the professor." He had a doctorate from a university in France and was once dean of the literature faculty at Kabul University in his native Afghanistan. Under former Afghan King Mohammed Zahir Shah, he had been a provincial governor and a diplomat.
NEWS
February 3, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
With hundreds of Afghans dying of the cold in squalid camps, the United Nations pleaded for urgent international assistance. "The situation is desperate. Most Afghans have lost everything," Erick de Mul, the U.N. coordinator for Afghanistan, said in neighboring Pakistan. Drought and war have driven hundreds of thousands from their homes. In the western province of Herat, 80,000 people are living in six U.N. camps. About 155,000 Afghans are living in squalor in Pakistan.
NEWS
February 28, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shy, smiling Naqibullah seems like most youngsters until he raises his right pant leg, exposing a plastic prosthesis--a rocket blew off the leg and mauled the other with shrapnel. Asked how he feels about the people who wounded him, the 8-year-old boy says, finally, "I hope God will cut off their leg like me." Tousle-haired Naqibullah was wounded two years ago as he played in a road here in the Afghan capital, one more victim of the pitched warfare among Afghanistan's feuding Muslim militias.
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | United Press International
A land mine exploded Tuesday beneath a pickup truck in western Pakistan, killing 11 Afghan refugees and wounding three others, officials said. All of the victims belonged to the same family and were traveling to an Afghan refugee camp to attend a funeral. The truck hit a mine near the border with Afghanistan, and 11 refugees traveling in the cargo bed were killed, officials said.
NEWS
August 19, 1988
The younger brother of Najibullah, Afghanistan's Soviet-backed leader, has been accepted as a refugee in the United States, a Reagan Administration official disclosed. Saddiqullah Rahi, 35, and his wife and two children reached the United States on Wednesday from West Germany and have received sanctuary, the official said.
NEWS
August 30, 2001 | From Reuters
The Australians stood their ground today, saying they would force a cargo ship overflowing with asylum seekers out of their territorial waters, as concern grew over the health of the unwanted boat people. Australian special forces in control of the Tampa stood guard on deck to stop the asylum seekers from jumping overboard if the ship leaves Australian waters around Christmas Island in the Indian Ocean.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new chief of the United Nations refugee agency said Tuesday that he hopes to send as many as 1.5 million displaced Afghans back to their beleaguered homeland, a move that would require close cooperation with the Taliban regime and a sharp increase in aid to that pariah state.
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | Times Wire Services
Bitter cold and hunger killed 150 refugees, mostly children, this week in camps filled with people fleeing the effects of Afghanistan's devastating drought, a Taliban minister said Thursday. The refugees died in the past three days in camps in Baghlan province in the north, Maulvi Abdul Raqib, the Taliban regime's minister for refugees, told a news conference. "Our people are dying.
NEWS
February 3, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
With hundreds of Afghans dying of the cold in squalid camps, the United Nations pleaded for urgent international assistance. "The situation is desperate. Most Afghans have lost everything," Erick de Mul, the U.N. coordinator for Afghanistan, said in neighboring Pakistan. Drought and war have driven hundreds of thousands from their homes. In the western province of Herat, 80,000 people are living in six U.N. camps. About 155,000 Afghans are living in squalor in Pakistan.
NEWS
February 15, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this storied frontier town, a clutch of musicians works to keep the soul of a nation alive. About 300 Afghan musical performers live and work in exile here, banished from their country by an extremist Islamic government that has made playing and listening to music a criminal offense. Many of the dancers, singers, musicians and composers fled Afghanistan in the 1980s, during a war against the Soviet Union.
NEWS
September 18, 1998 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Refugees fleeing an Afghan city recently conquered by the Taliban say that troops with the ultra-orthodox religious army slaughtered thousands of civilians when they took the town last month. The refugees, who are arriving here each day on foot from the northern Afghan city of Mazar-i-Sharif, say Taliban fighters focused exclusively on an ethnic minority known as the Hazaras, picked out by their distinctive Mongolian features.
NEWS
June 11, 1988 | United Press International
U.N. officials led by Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar launched an appeal Friday for humanitarian aid to help resettle Afghan refugees in their country. Prince Saddrudin Aga Khan, U.N. coordinator for humanitarian and economic assistance programs relating to Afghanistan, said $1.17 billion is needed for their repatriation in the next 18 months. Aga Khan said the second phase of resettlement from 1990 to 1993 will require another $839 million for long-term rehabilitation programs.
NEWS
April 26, 1988
Afghan President Najibullah offered to set up a line of demilitarized zones along his country's border with Pakistan as a means of allowing about 3 million refugees to return home safely. But Western diplomats dismissed the offer as a tacit admission that Afghan government and Soviet forces have lost control of the border areas.
NEWS
July 29, 1997 | From Associated Press
Fierce fighting north of the Afghan capital sent waves of villagers fleeing Monday, but the Taliban Islamic army held fast at its positions outside Kabul. In the last week, opposition forces punched through Taliban defense lines north of Kabul, taking strategic cities and the Baghram air base until finally coming within rocket range of the capital.
NEWS
February 28, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shy, smiling Naqibullah seems like most youngsters until he raises his right pant leg, exposing a plastic prosthesis--a rocket blew off the leg and mauled the other with shrapnel. Asked how he feels about the people who wounded him, the 8-year-old boy says, finally, "I hope God will cut off their leg like me." Tousle-haired Naqibullah was wounded two years ago as he played in a road here in the Afghan capital, one more victim of the pitched warfare among Afghanistan's feuding Muslim militias.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|