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NEWS
May 5, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebecca Wani's odyssey began in 1992 when raiders attacked her village in southern Sudan, killing her father. She fled in panic, beginning a life among people she barely knew. Six years later, the 27-year-old stands forlornly outside a U.N. office in suburban Cairo, hoping to be granted a status that she reckons she richly deserves: refugee.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2000 | ERIN TEXEIRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After suffering nearly two decades of almost daily beatings from her husband, Ethiopian-born Tsehai Wodajo fled to a domestic violence shelter three years ago. But she didn't understand the laws protecting battered women and was uncomfortable with the shelter's procedures. Terrified and confused, she left on the second day. "I cannot fit there," she said. "I went back home."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2000 | ERIN TEXEIRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After suffering nearly two decades of almost daily beatings from her husband, Ethiopian-born Tsehai Wodajo fled to a domestic violence shelter three years ago. But she didn't understand the laws protecting battered women and was uncomfortable with the shelter's procedures. Terrified and confused, she left on the second day. "I cannot fit there," she said. "I went back home."
NEWS
May 5, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebecca Wani's odyssey began in 1992 when raiders attacked her village in southern Sudan, killing her father. She fled in panic, beginning a life among people she barely knew. Six years later, the 27-year-old stands forlornly outside a U.N. office in suburban Cairo, hoping to be granted a status that she reckons she richly deserves: refugee.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lual Teng Atia demonstrated his learning by writing his name in the dirt with a stick. He shyly admitted to being 14 years old--although he was not quite sure. Why did he come to this place, he was asked. With an expression of implacable gravity heartbreaking in one so young, he uttered a single word: "Riak." An interpreter spoke up. "That means 'disaster,' " he said. It had been an evening three years ago.
NEWS
February 6, 1987 | MIKE MILLS, Times Staff Writer
Drought once was cited as the main reason refugees roamed southern Africa. Today the drought has subsided, but there are more starving refugees than ever. The new reason: political turmoil, according to relief officials. "There are now proportionately far more uprooted Angolans and Mozambicans than there were uprooted Ethiopians during the (famine) tragedy of 1984," Roger Winter, director of the privately funded U.S.
NEWS
July 3, 1997 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fighting that has rocked Congo, the Republic of Congo and the Central African Republic in recent months follows a pattern of unrest plaguing much of the region, analysts say, noting that Rwanda, Burundi, Angola, Sudan and Uganda all have been riven by insurgencies and are struggling to avert more bloodshed.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | From United Press International
Pope John Paul II, arriving Saturday in Tanzania at the start of a 10-day, four-country African tour, lost no time in tackling two of the continent's gravest problems: AIDS and refugees. Within three hours of a tumultuous welcome from hundreds of thousands of people on the Tarmac of Dar es Salaam airport, the 70-year-old pontiff called for a massive international effort to combat AIDS.
NEWS
July 28, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One camp is in a sports center, the other in a rocky field. Each is swamped with sick and dying Rwandans. And both received desperately needed medical help from the outside world Wednesday. There the similarities end. The Goma Cercle Sportif houses 2,400 ill and wounded soldiers, officers and political agents of the former Rwandan army, a force accused of widespread atrocities as it fought and lost a civil war to prop up a murderous regime. Down the road, the S.O.S.
NEWS
August 16, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior international relief agency leader Monday blamed the new Rwandan government for harassing refugees and pushing them toward another mass stampede out of the country. The official spoke out after weeks of what he described as frustration and double-speak in dealing with the new Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) government. But he insisted that he and his organization not be identified for fear its relief efforts would be compromised.
NEWS
July 3, 1997 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fighting that has rocked Congo, the Republic of Congo and the Central African Republic in recent months follows a pattern of unrest plaguing much of the region, analysts say, noting that Rwanda, Burundi, Angola, Sudan and Uganda all have been riven by insurgencies and are struggling to avert more bloodshed.
NEWS
August 26, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United Nations regained jurisdiction over Rwanda's 1.2 million refugees Friday, but its plan to resume sending them home took off sluggishly. Even allowing time to smooth the rough spots, this week's sound and fury over resettlement of exiled ethnic Hutus has served to remind the nations of this Central African region, and the developed world, that peaceful resolution of this predicament could take a year--more likely years.
NEWS
August 16, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior international relief agency leader Monday blamed the new Rwandan government for harassing refugees and pushing them toward another mass stampede out of the country. The official spoke out after weeks of what he described as frustration and double-speak in dealing with the new Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) government. But he insisted that he and his organization not be identified for fear its relief efforts would be compromised.
NEWS
July 28, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One camp is in a sports center, the other in a rocky field. Each is swamped with sick and dying Rwandans. And both received desperately needed medical help from the outside world Wednesday. There the similarities end. The Goma Cercle Sportif houses 2,400 ill and wounded soldiers, officers and political agents of the former Rwandan army, a force accused of widespread atrocities as it fought and lost a civil war to prop up a murderous regime. Down the road, the S.O.S.
NEWS
July 22, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The acrid stench of death filled the air here Thursday, as hundreds upon hundreds of corpses--a few here, a dozen a few yards farther, 25 more just beyond--lined dusty roads and littered the cruel fields of what has become the world's closest glimpse of hell.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lual Teng Atia demonstrated his learning by writing his name in the dirt with a stick. He shyly admitted to being 14 years old--although he was not quite sure. Why did he come to this place, he was asked. With an expression of implacable gravity heartbreaking in one so young, he uttered a single word: "Riak." An interpreter spoke up. "That means 'disaster,' " he said. It had been an evening three years ago.
NEWS
August 26, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United Nations regained jurisdiction over Rwanda's 1.2 million refugees Friday, but its plan to resume sending them home took off sluggishly. Even allowing time to smooth the rough spots, this week's sound and fury over resettlement of exiled ethnic Hutus has served to remind the nations of this Central African region, and the developed world, that peaceful resolution of this predicament could take a year--more likely years.
NEWS
July 22, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The acrid stench of death filled the air here Thursday, as hundreds upon hundreds of corpses--a few here, a dozen a few yards farther, 25 more just beyond--lined dusty roads and littered the cruel fields of what has become the world's closest glimpse of hell.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | From United Press International
Pope John Paul II, arriving Saturday in Tanzania at the start of a 10-day, four-country African tour, lost no time in tackling two of the continent's gravest problems: AIDS and refugees. Within three hours of a tumultuous welcome from hundreds of thousands of people on the Tarmac of Dar es Salaam airport, the 70-year-old pontiff called for a massive international effort to combat AIDS.
NEWS
February 6, 1987 | MIKE MILLS, Times Staff Writer
Drought once was cited as the main reason refugees roamed southern Africa. Today the drought has subsided, but there are more starving refugees than ever. The new reason: political turmoil, according to relief officials. "There are now proportionately far more uprooted Angolans and Mozambicans than there were uprooted Ethiopians during the (famine) tragedy of 1984," Roger Winter, director of the privately funded U.S.
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